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New 2018 Summer Courses


ANTH 102: Being Human: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

The nature of culture and humans as culture-bearing animals. The range of cultural phenomena including language, social organization, religion, and culture change, and the relevance of anthropology for contemporary social, economic, and ecological problems.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Jing Wang

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2018 Summer

ANTH 335: Illegal Drugs and Society

This course provides perspectives on illegal drug use informed by the social, political and economic dimensions of the issues. Framed by the history, epidemiology, and medical consequences of drug use, students will confront the complex challenges posed by addiction. Anthropological research conducted in the U.S. and cross-culturally will demonstrate, elaborate and juxtapose various clinical, public health, and law enforcement policies and perspectives. Topics examined will include: why exclusively using a bio-medical model of addiction is inadequate; how effective is the war on drugs; what prevention, intervention and treatment efforts work; and various ideological/moral perspectives on illegal drug use.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MW 10:30a-1:30p

Instructor: Allison Schlosser

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2018 Summer

BIOL 309/409: Field Studies in Biology

We’re sorry to report this course has been canceled.

Spend Summer Session 2018 conducting scientific research on an island in Lake Erie. For two weeks, the course will be based at Kelley’s Island Field Station, located on Kelley’s Island in Lake Erie, 3.5 miles north of Marblehead, Ohio. Kelley’s Island has more than 15 miles of shoreline, over 150 acres of natural protected land and is home to unique geologic features including the Glacial Grooves and the North Shore Alvar. Class meetings in Cleveland will cover logistics, biodiversity, and current ecological, environmental, and social issues associated with Lake Erie. Time at the field site will be spent listening to resident lecturers, receiving guided tours, observing and identifying wild organisms in their natural habitat, and conducting a research project. Students will design a field-based research experiment, perform the experiment in the field, and then report their results in the form of a term paper and oral presentation. Instructor consent required to register. Course satisfies a laboratory requirement of the B.A. and B.S. in Biology. Course may be repeated for credit up to two times if traveling to a new destination. *Note: *Course requires students to be physically fit and in good health. Activities will include hiking and long periods spent outdoors. Students will be exposed to hot weather and biting/stinging insects.  Offered as BIOL 309 and BIOL 409. Prereq: BIOL 216. The course fee will be $500 for housing, transportation, and equipment. Food not included.

Week 1: 6/4-6/9, MWF, 10:00-10:50, on campus; Weeks 2-3: 6/11-6/22, Kelley’s Island; Week 4: 6/25-6/29, MWF, 10:00-10:50, on campus

Dates: Week 1: 6/4-6/9, MWF, 10:00-10:50, on campus; Weeks 2-3: 6/11-6/22, Kelley's Island; Week 4: 6/25-6/29, MWF, 10:00-10:50, on campus

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TBA

Instructor: Ronald Oldfield

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2018 Summer

BIOL 312: Introductory Plant Biology

This course will provide an overview of plant biology. Topics covered will include: (1) Plant structure, function and development from the cellular level to the whole plant (2) plant diversity, evolution of the bacteria, fungi, algae, bryophytes and vascular plants; (3) adaptations to their environment, plant-animal interactions, and human uses of plants. Prerequisite for this course: undergraduate student and [Biol 215]; or [Requisites not met Permission].

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2018 Summer

BIOL 330: Human Genetics: Diseases and Mechanisms

We’re sorry to report this course has been canceled.

This course is a survey of human inherited diseases as examples of the molecular basis of genetic disease, developmental genetics, testing for inherited genetic disease, ethical dilemmas in human genetics, genetic diseases as drivers for drug development, and orphan inherited disorders. A combination of current and classic literature will be used to provide background on specific inherited human disorders, while a case-based approach will be used in the classroom to promote discussion. Classes will be in the format of a mixture of short lectures, student-led discussions, and formal presentations made by students. This course fulfills the cell and molecular breadth requirement for the BA and BS in Biology.  Prerequisite for this course: undergraduate student and [BIOL 326] or [Requisites not met Permission].

Dates: June 4-June 29, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTuWTh 3:00pm - 5:15pm

Instructor: Audrey Lynn

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2018 Summer

CHEM 348/448: Chemistry of Fermentation and Brewing

To discern the molecular basis of fermentation and beer brewing, this course includes in-depth discussions of the chemistry underlying either an aspect of the brewing process or a style of beer (alt, kolsch, porter, bock, mead, ale, etc.).  The biochemistry of yeast fermentation, as well as mashing, lautering, boiling, conditioning, filtering, and packaging will be discussed.  There is no lab component (such as brewing beer), although field trips to the Jolly-Scholar pub (located on campus) will be part of the course, as well as invited speakers who have set up local microbreweries.  Each student will be expected to have basic background knowledge of chemistry, such as material taught in standard first year General Chemistry courses (CHEM 105, 106, and 111).  Lastly, the teacher of this course is a seasoned chemistry professor who has extensive experience with brewing beer!

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Michael Zagorski

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Chemistry, New 2018 Summer

CLSC 202: Classical Mythology

The myths of Classical Greece and Rome, their interpretation and influence. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TuTh 9:00a-12:00p

Instructor: Rachel Sternberg

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Classics, New 2018 Summer

COSI 406: Academic English Proficiency Speech Production

Students will work in small groups with the instructor/s to develop new speech habits and patterns to improve production of spoken English for academic and professional success. Following successful completion of the course the student will demonstrate an improvement of 50% from baseline speech production scores, and demonstrate the ability to practice sound production independently to assure continued refinement over time.

The course includes 90 minutes of small group instructions per week and a minimum of 50-60 minutes of daily practice. The student will be required to submit a minimum of 2 practice recordings per week for feedback.

Students who successfully complete this course will demonstrate 50% improvement from baseline speech production scores.

Permission of instructor required.  To register please contact Kurt Koenigsberger.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MF 8:30-10:00a

Instructor: Angela Ciccia

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, Psychological Sciences

DSCI 352: Applied Data Science Research

This is a project based data science research class, in which project teams identify a research project under the guidance of a domain expert professor. The research is structured as a data analysis project including the 6 steps of developing a reproducible data science project, including 1: Define the ADS question, 2: Identify, locate, and/or generate the data 3: Exploratory data analysis 4: Statistical modeling and prediction 5: Synthesizing the results in the domain context 6: Creation of reproducible research, Including code, datasets, documentation and reports.  During the course special topic lectures will include Ethics, Privacy, Openness, Security, Ethics. Value.  Offered as DSCI 352 and DSCI 452.  Prereq: (DSCI 133 or DSCI 134 or ENGR 131 or EECS 132) and (STAT 312R or STAT 201R or SYBB 310 or PQHS/EPBI 431 or OPRE 207) and (DSCI 351 or (SYBB 311A and SYBB 311B and SYBB 311C and SYBB 311D) or SYBB 321 or MKMR 201).

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 12:30-2:00p

Instructor: Laura Bruckman

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Data Science, New 2018 Summer

ENGL 414: Advanced Academic Communication and Presentation

In this course, graduate students develop the interactive speaking skills needed to participate effectively in seminar-style discussions and other formal group situations. In addition, the class focuses on the skills international graduate students need to organize and deliver presentations for academic and professional audiences. This class will reinforce and expand on oral communication strategies students learned in the previous semester.

Permission of Instructor is required.  To register please contact Kurt Koenigsberger

Dates: June 18-August 3, 2018

Time: MTuWTh 1:30-2:50p

Instructor: Ana Codita

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, New 2018 Summer

ENGL 415: Academic Research and Writing

The course focuses on the skills graduate students need to write research papers. This class will reinforce reading strategies students learned in the previous semester and graduate students will learn to organize ideas, synthesize material from written and other sources, and develop organizational and rhetorical skills appropriate to their discipline. Students will also learn to use reflection and self-assessment to become more independent and competent writers. This class will reinforce and expand on writing strategies students learned in the previous semester. Activities include small group work, analysis of academic texts, writing in a variety of academic genres, revising and editing, and tutorial sessions.

Permission of Instructor is required.  To register please contact Kurt Koenigsberger.

 

Dates: June 18-August 3, 2018

Time: MTuWTh 10:30-11:50a

Instructor: Ana Codita

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, New 2018 Summer

HSTY 124: Sex and the City: Gender & Urban History

Gender is an identity and an experience written onto the spaces of the city. The urban landscape – with its streets, buildings, bridges, parks and squares – shapes and reflects gender identities and sexual relations. This course examines the relationship between gender and urban space from the 19th century to the present, giving special attention to the city of Cleveland. Using Cleveland as our case study, this course will explore some of the many ways in which cities and the inhabitants of cities have been historically sexed, gendered, and sexualized. We will explore the ways in which gender was reflected and constructed by the built environment, as well as how urban space and urban life shaped gender and sexual identities. The course is organized thematically and explores different aspects of city life such as prostitution, urban crime, labor, politics, urban renewal and decay, consumption and leisure and the ways in which sex and gender intersects with these issues. In addition to reading and analyzing secondary and primary sources, we will also experience ourselves how gender is being written onto the urban landscape by walking in the city and going to its museums.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Einav Rabinovitch-Fox

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2018 Summer

ITAL 308: The Italian Experience

A three-week summer study abroad course spent at a university in an Italian city well-known for its cultural and linguistic heritage and at other important sites during travel. Focus: Language immersion and processing of cultural experience. Main features: 1. Intense collaboration with an Italian university. Students interact with Italian peers; seminars are co-taught by Italian faculty. 2. Creation of an individual journal that synthesizes students’ perception of and reflections on their experience, records the progress of their final project, and documents their improvement in language proficiency. 3. Final project. Students meet M-F in a formal setting for advanced language study designed to improve proficiency in speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. They attend seminars on varied topics in literature, history, and civilization. Visits to museums, galleries, and attendance at cultural events are included.

For more information, please visit the course website

The first 10 undergraduate students who enroll in Italian Experience (ITAL 308) will receive a $1000 scholarship from the the Eirik Borve Fund for Foreign Language Instruction to go towards their study abroad language program. To be eligible, students must be CWRU undergraduates who have completed the initial study abroad application and submitted their deposit to the Office of Education Abroad. Only students enrolled in the language version of the course where the study abroad program is cross-listed are scholarship eligible. For additional questions, contact the Office of Education Abroad at studyabroad@case.edu.

 

Dates: May 14-18 on Campus; May 22-31 in Italy

Session: May Term

Session: Study Abroad

Time: TBA

Instructor: Denise Caterinacci

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2018 Summer, Study Abroad

PSCL 357: Cognitive Psychology

How individuals encode, store, organize, and use information. Pattern recognition, attention, memory, and problem solving. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 4:30-6:35p

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, Psychological Sciences

UNIV 300: Premedical Concepts and Review: MCAT Preparation

This course is designed to comprehensively review all Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) content areas, as well as testing methods, and hone the skills students need to improve performance on the MCAT. This course will be team taught to include faculty expertise in biochemistry, biology, chemistry, English, mathematics, physics, psychological sciences, and sociology. Critical analysis and reasoning skills will be emphasized. Students will gain practice working on MCAT questions that test knowledge and critical thinking. Faculty will provide directed feedback to students to assist them in their test taking strategies.  Completion of introductory courses in all subject areas above is strongly recommended before taking this review course.

The MCAT is administered by the AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges). Course materials include sample questions, two practice exams, and other materials from the AAMC.

May Term: 5/14 – 6/1, MTWRF, 9:30am – 1:00pm

View this course in the Schedule of Classes here.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-1:00p

Instructor: Rebecca Benard, Susan Burden-Gulley, Greg Tochtrop, T. Kenney Fountain, Diana Driscoll, Arin Connell, Jessica Kelly, Jill Korbin

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, Chemistry, English, New 2018 Summer, Physics, Psychological Sciences, Sociology

USNA 287S: Society and Natural Resource

The relationship between humans and the natural world can be defined in large part by how societies manage natural resources. In this seminar, students will analyze how society-environment interactions have undergone substantial shifts over time…from John Locke’s Labor Theory of Value and the rise of utilitarian conservation to more recent approaches based on ecosystem management that emphasize ecological integrity and stakeholder collaboration. Course readings will challenge students to think critically about how humans conceptualize and impact the environment. Class time will be spent discussing the evolution of effective human-ecological systems interactions as outlined in the readings, as well as reviewing student reflection papers that connect course concepts to real word scenarios. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TR 6:00-8:30p

Instructor: Scott Hardy

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, SAGES

USSY 288I: Diversions: Experimental Stories and New Media

We’re sorry to report this course has been canceled.

In this course, students will study works in which the authors and artists have experimented with traditional linear forms and created stories that are, for instance, labyrinthine, framed, collaged, geometrical, digressive, and even networked. While both print-based and digital texts offer spaces for diverse and deeply engaging written or visual performances, they also require further critical inquiry into the ways in which they create, reflect, or resist social and cultural values. Our focus in this course will be exploring how stories (and other texts) – in print, on screen, on canvas, in digital formats – that don’t follow or that play with conventional rules of order encourage us to participate in making sense of our contemporary world. The goals of the course include: exploring the relationship between form and content in written and visual productions, developing a critical perspective from which to enjoy, assess, and respond creatively to traditional print and multimedia presentations, and making excellent use of research resources at CWRU and cultural resources at University Circle. In addition, students will work to develop their writing and presentation skills and to innovate novel models of research writing. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWTh 10:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Kristine Kelly

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, SAGES

USSY 293R: Representing the AIDS Crisis

In this course, we will examine how the AIDS Crisis of the 1980s and 1990s was represented in American literature, film, and art, and how authors and artists engaged imaginatively with the Crisis. As we examine a number of works that represent the AIDS Crisis, our inquiry will focus on the following questions: How do activists use literary and artistic works for political and social change? How do artists and writers use and represent activism in their works? More specifically, what role does metaphor play in how HIV/AIDS is understood? What are the ethics of representing the AIDS Crisis? Is it unethical for writers and artists to use tragic events imaginatively?

To answer these questions, we will examine a variety of representations of the Crisis across a number of genres, notably novels, short stories, zines, films, and conceptual art. The texts under examination represent a variety of perspectives on the topic of HIV/AIDS, from activists and artists, members of the LGBTQ community, racial and ethnic minorities, and differing socioeconomic classes. By comparing these genres, we trace the often-conflicting strategies used by authors and artists for representing the AIDS Crisis. Theoretical texts will introduce students to queer perspectives, concepts of testimonial writing and bearing witness to tragic events, the uses of the imagination in creating art and literature, and the functioning of metaphor in art and society.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWTh 2:30-4:00p

Instructor: Michael Chiappini

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, SAGES

Page last modified: December 5, 2017