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New This Year Courses


ARTH 241: Medieval Art

This course will introduce students to the pivotal works of art created between approximately 250 and 1500. We will discuss painting, sculpture, architecture, manuscript illumination, and graphic arts. Medieval visual and material culture will be considered within the framework of socio-political developments, rapid urban growth, the flowering of monastic culture, the rise of universities, and changes in devotional practices. While the course will primarily focus on western part of the medieval Christendom, we will also discuss Jewish, Byzantine, and Islamic art. Visits to the CMA will form an integral part of the course. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 10:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Aimee Caya

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, New This Year

ARTS 286: Introduction to Video Games

Game design creates meaningful play through interactive experiences. This introductory studio based course, explores games through the development and creation of 2D video games. The course aims to provide a critical vocabulary and historical context for analyzing games and gaming theory and focuses on the skills and techniques necessary to develop 2D video games.

Dates: June 19-July 31, 2017

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MW 4:00-7:00p

Instructor: Jared Bendis

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art Studio, New This Year

ARTS 305/405: Study Abroad: Architecture, Design & Culture (New Zealand)

This 3-week intensive Wellington, New Zealand summer course immerses students into a culture that solves architectural problems through a sophisticated appreciation for design, aesthetics and conceptualization. The program introduces students to critical inquiry through shared principles and theories of art, architecture and design, as experienced in New Zealand’s cultural capital. Using the city as our classroom, students will visit well-known sites, museums and monuments as well as hidden gems that reinforce concepts presented in readings, lectures and class discussions.

For more information, please visit the course website

View course flyer

 

Dates: July 10-30, 2017

Time: Course meets in Wellington, New Zealand

Instructor: Sally Levine

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art Studio, New This Year, Study Abroad

BIOL 346: Human Anatomy

Gross anatomy of the human body. Two lectures and one laboratory demonstration per week. Prereq: BIOL 216 or BIOL 251.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Ronald Oldfield

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New This Year

CLSC 318/418: Archaeological & Epigraphical Field School

This interdisciplinary course takes place in situ in the Mediterranean and will be attached to an active archaeological project. Students will learn the methodological principles of archaeological and epigraphical fieldwork by participating in activities such as surveying, excavation, museum work, geophysical survey, artifact analysis, and other scientific techniques. In addition to work in the field and museum, students will receive an introduction to the history Greco-Roman culture through visits to major archaeological sites in the region. Examples of active archaeological projects may vary, depending on the year. Offered as CLSC 318 and CLSC 418.

Dates: June 11-July 7, 2017

Time: Course meets in Corinth, Greece

Instructor: Paul Iversen

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Classics, New This Year, Study Abroad

HSTY 219: Berlin in the Tumultuous 20th Century (Germany)

The tumultuous but short twentieth century began and ended with a united Germany, with Berlin as its capital. But in between, Berlin, and Berliners, experienced the extremes of the economic, technological, and cultural progress that the century brought, and the devastation, violence, division, and uncertainty that it also brought. This course, taught with Berlin as its laboratory, introduces students to the German tumult of the twentieth century. We will read about historical events and developments, and then visit the places where those events and developments occurred. We will address persistent questions, such as why and how did Hitler come to power; what was life like behind the Berlin wall; why is there a Forever 21 across from the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Memorial Church; how does one come to grips with a history like Germany’s in the twentieth century; and what has life been like for ordinary Berliner/innen. Students are welcome to take this course before they have any background or acquaintance with the German language, although the instructor expects students to be able to navigate independently in Berlin after he provides them with an introduction. German proficiency will enrich the student’s experience in Berlin, and the instructor hopes that some of the students who enroll will already be pursuing the study of the German language. The instructor further hopes that students who have never before studies German language will be inspired to begin to learn German after they return to Case Western Reserve. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: Course meets in Berlin, Germany

Instructor: Kenneth Ledford

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New This Year, Study Abroad

POSC 389/489: Special Topics in American Politics and Policy: The Battle of the Budget

Specific topic will vary but will consist of an in-depth investigation of a particular policy area or political phenomenon. Topics will involve policy controversies of some current interest. Offered as POSC 389 and POSC 489.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 10:30a-12:30p

Instructor: Joseph White

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Political Science

PSCL 321: Abnormal Psychology

Major syndromes of mental disorders, their principal symptoms, dynamics, etiology, and treatment. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 19-July 31, 2017

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 1:00-3:00p

Instructor: TJ McCallum

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Psychological Sciences

PSCL 353: Psychology of Learning

The basic methods in the study of learning. The major theories proposed to account for the learning process. Development of the fundamental concepts and principles governing the learning process in both humans and lower animal. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 19-July 31, 2017

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 4:30-6:30p

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Psychological Sciences

RLGN 215: Religion in America

This course is an introduction to American religions, with a particular focus on religious diversity in the United States. As we examine the myriad beliefs and practices of America’s religious communities, we will pay close attention to how religion and culture have shaped each other from the 1600s to today.

To explore the theme of religious diversity, we will take advantage of Cleveland’s rich religious history with visits to local religious institutions and historical sites, including churches, mosques, new religious communities, and Hindu and Buddhist temples. Along the way we will consider the role of religious spaces and institutions in shaping identity and community in our region and beyond.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Religious Studies

THTR 100: Introduction to Acting

A course designed to provide the non-major or undeclared liberal arts major experience with a basic understanding of acting and performance. Fundamentals in improvisation, vocabulary, and scene study are stressed. This course fulfills THTR 101 or THTR 102 should the undeclared student select theater as his or her major or minor. Students may receive credit for only one of THTR 100, THTR 101, or THTR 102.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuW 6:00-8:20p

Instructor: Christopher Bohan

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Theater

USNA 288W: Medieval Science

Humans have always had ways to distinguish themselves from one another, employing different approaches to defining concepts we now refer to as race/ethnicity, dis/ability, sexuality, and gender. Science has always been an important component to these constructs, although what constituted science and scientific inquiry varied widely based on culture and historical context. Most recently, our advancing understanding of genetics has produced ever more nuanced definitions of human difference, even as we have come to recognize that such explanations often compete with theories that are grounded in social and cultural values, rather than scientific observation. Yet how did people explain human diversity in the 1000 years before the Scientific Revolution unfolded in Europe?

In this seminar, we will investigate how medieval thinkers differentiated humans using a mix of medical observation, philosophy, theories about the natural world, cultural prejudice, and religious belief. We will examine how Greek, Roman, Chinese, Indian, Arab, and early European theories of human difference shaped a medieval view of humanity that is occasionally strikingly different from our own and often quite familiar. How did people living in this period differentiate humans from the rest of the natural world? Did they use the same categories of race, gender, and sexuality that we use? How did scientific thinking evolve to construct these taxonomies of difference? How did historical movements and events such as global commerce, the slave trade, and the Crusades influence the development of these ways of thinking? To explore these questions, we will read a variety of primary texts from the medieval period, in the hopes that by discussing these other approaches to defining human differences, we will gain greater insight into our own frameworks and assumptions.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWTh 2:30-4:00p

Instructor: Lisa Nielson

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, SAGES

USSO 291J: Narratives of Immigration

As one of the most pressing issues of the twenty-first century, immigration has captured the imagination of politicians and authors alike. In this class, we will explore the stories of those who have migrated to the United States. We will analyze how various writers create autobiographical and fictional narratives of migration, addressing issues such as adjusting to different cultures, learning new languages, and adapting to new environments. Through these stories and histories, we will ask broader questions about immigration, including: is migration a basic human right? Is it ethical to define someone as being “illegal” for peacefully working and living in a different country from where they were born? What are the gendered, ethnic, cultural, and racial barriers that exist when migrating between countries? What are the cost(s) of citizenship and embracing a new country as one’s home? As the United States is largely seen as a nation of immigrants, how have immigrants’ stories perpetuated or undermined this reputation?

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuTh 6:00-8:30p

Instructor: Cara Byrne

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, SAGES

USSY 291W: World War I in Literature and Culture

As cities around the globe mark the centennial of World War I (1914–1918), this seminar will explore the relationship between that watershed moment and the varieties of literature and art it inspired. In what ways did “the Great War” shape the direction of twentieth-century culture? How was language itself altered, as new vocabularies emerged (e.g., “shell-shock,” “the home front”) and previously venerable terms such as “honor” and “sacrifice” acquired radically different connotations? What strategies did writers and artists evolve in order to contend with the magnitude of the conflict and its unprecedented human cost? Assessing the war’s impact on Western thought, the poet Philip Larkin famously wrote, “Never such innocence again”—yet this loss of innocence also coincided with the birth of new forms of literary and artistic expression. In this course we’ll discuss and write about such innovations as they occurred in the visual arts—painting, sculpture, film—and in literary works by Ernest Hemingway, Virginia Woolf, and other writers who used the resources of imaginative literature to grapple with the Great War and its consequences.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWR 12:00-1:30p

Instructor: Steven Pinkerton

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, SAGES

USSY 292X: Internal Medicine: Memoir, Medical Education, and the Making of a Physician

Approximately 18,000 people graduate from medical school in the United States every year, and increasingly, many of them are writing about their experience of medical school in blog posts, essay collections, and memoirs. But why would a medical doctor, who has limited free time, choose to write about their experience of medical school at all? In this class, we will investigate how we understand the figure of the physician in our cultural imagination; how/why do memoirs and autobiographies help the public construct that image; and how does writing a memoir help physicians construct and maintain their own sense of self? In our search of answers to these questions, we will analyze several memoirs, essays, and edited collections written by medical students and physicians that focus on the experience of medical school, and what it actually means to become a doctor. We will gain insight into the ways that gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality have an impact on, and further complicate, this becoming. Finally, and most importantly, we will learn how physicians employ what renowned surgeon and author Dr. Richard Selzer thought of as the ultimate coping strategy: writing.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MW 6:00-8:30p

Instructor: Melissa Pompili

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, SAGES

Page last modified: November 30, 2016