Summer Session

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New This Year Courses


ANTH 314/414: Cultures of the United States

This course considers the rich ethnic diversity of the U.S. from the perspective of social/cultural anthropology. Conquest, immigration, problems of conflicts and accommodation, and the character of the diverse regional and ethnic cultures are considered as are forms of racism, discrimination, and their consequences. Groups of interest include various Latina/o and Native peoples, African-American groups, and specific ethnic groups of Pacific, Mediterranean, European, Asian, and Caribbean origin. Offered as ANTH 314, ETHS 314, and ANTH 414.

Dates: May 9-27, 2016

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWTh 9:30a-12:30p

Instructor: Atwood Gaines

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New This Year

ARTH 250: Art in the Age of Discovery

A survey of developments in Renaissance art and architecture in northern Europe and Italy during a new age of science, discovery and exploration, 1400-1600.

Dates: June 6-August 1, 2016

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuTh 10:30a-12:45p

Instructor: Kylie Fisher

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, New This Year

ARTH 260: Art in Early Modern Europe

A survey of European art in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, an era of rising nationalism, political aggrandizement, religious expansion and extravagant art patronage. The tensions between naturalism and idealization, court and city, public and private, church and secular patronage, grand commissions and an open air market, will provide themes of the course as we explore what characterized the arts of Austria, Belgium, England, France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, and Spain.

Dates: June 20-August 1, 2016

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MWF 1:00-3:05p

Instructor: James Wehn

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, New This Year

BIOL 333: Human Microbiome

This departmental seminar is designed to reveal how the abundant community of human-associated microorganisms influence human development, physiology, immunity and nutrition. Using a survey of current literature, this discussion-based course will emphasize an understanding of the complexity and dynamics of human/microbiome interactions and the influence of environment, genetics and individual life histories on the microbiome and human health. Grades will be based on participation, written assignments, exams, an oral presentation and a final paper. Prerequisites are completion of BIOL 214 and BIOL 216. This class is offered as a SAGES Departmental Seminar and fulfills an Organismal breadth requirement of the BA and BS in Biology. Currently the class is not open to graduate students. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Prereq: BIOL 214 and BIOL 216.

Dates: July 11-August 5, 2016

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 10:30a-12:45p

Instructor: Dianne Kube

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New This Year

BIOL 362/462: Developmental Biology

The descriptive and experimental aspects of animal development. Gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, morphogenesis, induction, differentiation, organogenesis, growth, and regeneration. Students taking the graduate-level course will prepare an NIH-format research proposal as the required term paper. Offered as BIOL 362 and BIOL 462. Prereq: BIOL 216 or BIOL 251 or EBME 201 and EBME 202

Dates: July 11-August 5, 2016

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 9:00-11:15a

Instructor: Susan Burden-Gulley

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New This Year

CLSC 202: Classical Mythology

The myths of Classical Greece and Rome, their interpretation and influence.

Dates: June 20-August 1, 2016

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TuTh 9:00a-12:00p

Instructor: Rachel Sternberg

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Classics, New This Year

CLSC 295A: Greek and Latin Elements in English: The Basic Course

A self-paced, computer-assisted course in the classical foundations of modern English in which the student learns the basic principles on which roots, prefixes, and suffixes combine to give precise meanings to composite words.

Dates: June 20-July 8, 2016

Time: MWF 9:00-11:30a

Instructor: Timothy Wutrich

Credits: 1.5 credits

Departments: Classics, New This Year

CLSC 295B: Greek and Latin Elements in English: Biomedical Terminology

Advanced section that is oriented especially toward scientific and medical terminology. Prereq or Coreq: CLSC 295A.

Dates: July 11-July 29, 2016

Time: MWF 9:00-11:00a

Instructor: Timothy Wutrich

Credits: 1.5 credits

Departments: Classics, New This Year

EECS 233T: Introduction to Data Structures (in Chulalongkorn, Thailand)

The programming language Java; pointers, files, and recursion. Representation and manipulation of data: one way and circular linked lists, doubly linked lists; the available space list. Different representations of stacks and queues. Representation of binary trees, trees and graphs. Hashing; searching and sorting. Prereq: EECS 132.

 

For more information, please visit the course website.

 

Dates: June 6-July 1, 2016

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: Course meets in Chulalongkorn, Thailand

Instructor: Vincenzo Liberatore

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, New This Year, Study Abroad

ETHS 314/414: Cultures of the United States

This course considers the rich ethnic diversity of the U.S. from the perspective of social/cultural anthropology. Conquest, immigration, problems of conflicts and accommodation, and the character of the diverse regional and ethnic cultures are considered as are forms of racism, discrimination, and their consequences. Groups of interest include various Latina/o and Native peoples, African-American groups, and specific ethnic groups of Pacific, Mediterranean, European, Asian, and Caribbean origin. Offered as ANTH 314, ETHS 314, and ANTH 414.

Dates: May 9-27, 2016

Session: May Term

Time: MTWTh 9:30-12:30

Instructor: Atwood Gaines

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Ethnic Studies, New This Year

FRCH 313/413: Medical French

Medical French is an upper-level course with a focus on health care in France and other Francophone countries. Students gain knowledge of the health care structures of various Francophone countries, as well as the vocabulary used in professional medical communication. Special emphasis on Doctors without Borders (Medecins sans frontieres). There will be visits to local hospitals and health care sites. Press articles, media reports, films, videos, and short literary texts are used as resources. Offered as FRCH 313 and FRCH 413. Prereq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

Dates: May 9-27, 2016

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Marie Lathers

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New This Year

HSTY 205: Heavens and Havens: History of American Suburbia

As suburbs have become a familiar sight for most Americans, it is easy to forget that suburbanization was one of the biggest changes in American society in the twentieth century. Suburbanization did not only transform the natural landscape, but it also restructured gender relations, accentuated racial and class inequities, realigned political loyalties, fueled consumption, and inspired cultural critiques. The rapid and unrestrained growth of suburbs had far-reaching consequences with which we still live and grapple today. This course examines the social, cultural, political, and economic history of suburbanization in the United States, with particular focus on the post-World War II era. Over the course of the (brief) semester, we will discuss such disparate topics as domesticity, segregation, malls, soccer moms, working-class discontent, zoning laws, fast food, teenage boredom, highways, and lawns.

Dates: June 6-August 1, 2016

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 6:00-7:30p

Instructor: Michael Metsner

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New This Year

POSC 379/479: Introduction to Middle East Politics

This is an introductory course about Middle East Politics, in regional as well as international aspects. In this course we will explore broad social, economic, and political themes that have defined the region since the end of World War Two. Since this is an introductory course, a major goal will be to gain comparative knowledge about the region’s states and peoples. The countries that comprise the modern Middle East are quite diverse; therefore, we will only be able to focus on a few cases in depth. A second goal is to use the tools and theories social scientists employ to answer broad questions related to the region, such as: How have colonial legacies shaped political and economic development in the Middle East? How do oil, religion, and identity interact with politics? How have external powers affected the region’s political development? What do the uprisings of 2011 hold for the region’s future? Offered as POSC 379 and POSC 479.

Dates: June 6-July 1, 2016

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTuWTh 1:00-3:15p

Instructor: Pete Moore

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Political Science

POSC 389: The Republican National Convention: Cleveland 2016

The course takes advantage of the Republican National Convention, being held in Cleveland from July 18 to July 21, 2016.  Although the course focuses on the RNC specifically, it will compare the RNC rules and candidates with their Democratic National counterparts (meeting the following week in Philadelphia), and will address questions concerning party identification, primary v. general elections, the nature of the primary electorate, how convention rules shape nomination outcomes, and the relationship between political parties and social movements, among other questions.

Offered MTWThF, 9:30am-12:00pm, from July 5 to July 22.  Offered for 3 credits.  The course may involve additional out-of-classroom meetings and research at the RNC, to be determined.

POSC 489 will not be offered for Summer 2016.

Dates: July 5-July 22, 2016

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Karen Beckwith

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Political Science

USNA 288U: The Technological Sublime

The Three Gorges Dam in China. The Panama Canal. The Palm Jumeirah archipelago in Dubai. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch. These immense human-made objects have the power to dwarf us and challenge our comprehension. They inspire awe and sometimes even a little fear, an experience we might call an encounter with the technological sublime. Experiences with the technological sublime can stimulate us to make things that are faster, bigger, and stronger. But they can also motivate us to question the limits of our technology, as well as consider possible negative–even disastrous–consequences. In this seminar, we will examine how scientists, engineers, urban planners, and architects have thought about the meaning of such mega-projects and their impact on the natural world.

Dates: June 6-August 1, 2016

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWTh 10:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Matthew Burkhart

Credits: 3 credits

Department: New This Year, SAGES

USSY 292J: Fictional Faith: Religion in 20th Century American Literature

What can today’s literature teach us about religion in a secular age?

Imagine you are ‘browsing through your favorite bookstore. You discover that someone has moved a copy of the Bible under the sign that says “Fiction.” Strangely, this doesn’t surprise you, because you are familiar with what it usually means to be secular: to witness the decline of religious authority and the primacy of reason. What you may not stop to consider, however, is what this gesture says about the rest of the books on the shelf. How does secular reason change the way we think about fiction?

According to one explanation, modernity is a condition where the secular has supplanted the sacred: the natural replaces the supernatural, ordinary life replaces mystical yearnings, and reason replaces faith. Faith, by this account, has more in common with fiction than with fact. This story isn’t wrong about the changing role of religion in public life, even though it generalizes too much about the complexity and diversity of faith traditions. What it misunderstands, however, is the power of fiction.

In this seminar, we will consider how modern writers transform secular life in an unlikely way: by renewing our interest in religion. Why do nonreligious writers remain preoccupied with religious images and themes? How do religious writers seek to connect with a secular audience? Does religion’s importance for contemporary writers prompt us to rethink how we understand the familiar explanation of secular modernity? To answer these questions, we will examine a handful of texts by authors from the United States. We will use our observations to reconsider our own assumptions about how religion and secularism, faith and reason, commingle within the modern imagination.

Dates: June 6-August 1, 2016

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TTh 6:00-8:30p

Instructor: Raymond Horton

Credits: 3 credits

Department: New This Year, SAGES

USSY 289G: The American West on Film

Few geographical areas in the United States contain as many tall tales and mythological figures as the American frontier. From an extreme point of view, the West is the only American myth because no other nation can claim the cowboy, the Native American, or the immigrant worker on the transcontinental railroad. And yet, each of these figures remains spectacularly diverse. We celebrate their variety and lionize their individuality in film, popular novels, and cultural criticism. From the visions of the New World to the conquest of the frontier, the color of the American West proliferates and transforms, defining our culture. In this course, we will investigate how critics have understood our fascination with the Western frontier. The class will broadly explore version of the frontier in novels, films, and historical accounts. Reading about the history of the actual west, the course will then examine how the films of the twentieth century alter history in order to express the fantasies and anxieties of their own time. By studying both history and film, we will be able to interrogate manifest destiny and the myth of American exceptionalism. What makes the West such an integral part of our understanding of America? How has its actual history become myth? What does the American fascination with the cowboy, the Native American, or the outlaw imply about our nation?Prereq: Passing letter grade in a first year seminar in FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, or FSCS. Prereq or Coreq: FSTS 100. Requisites not met permission required if previous course completion in this subject group.

Dates: June 6-August 1, 2016

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TTh 10:00a-12:30p

Instructor: Joshua Hoeynck

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, SAGES