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New This Year Courses


ARTH 241: Medieval Art

This course will introduce students to the pivotal works of art created between approximately 250 and 1500. We will discuss painting, sculpture, architecture, manuscript illumination, and graphic arts. Medieval visual and material culture will be considered within the framework of socio-political developments, rapid urban growth, the flowering of monastic culture, the rise of universities, and changes in devotional practices. While the course will primarily focus on western part of the medieval Christendom, we will also discuss Jewish, Byzantine, and Islamic art. Visits to the CMA will form an integral part of the course. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

Class meets in Classroom A at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2015

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: WF 1:00-3:15p

Instructor: Dominique DeLuca

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History, New This Year

ARTS 305: Study Abroad: Paris Architecture; Design & Culture

Problem Solving is at the very core of Design, and no city has been more inventive when it comes to Problem Solving than Paris. In the mid-nineteenth century when women were not allowed to go into restaurants unaccompanied by men, Paris introduced outdoor cafes; in the seventeenth century when building heights were limited by the lower edge of roof tiles, Mansart introduced a roof with a steep pitch allowing extra height with living space behind the roof tiles; in the Middle Ages when balconies were banned because they extended beyond the building footprint, French doors opened into apartments creating windows that simulated balconies. This 4-week intensive Paris summer course immerses students into a culture that solves architectural problems through a sophisticated appreciation for design, aesthetics and conceptualization. The program introduces students to critical inquiry through the shared principles and theories of Art, Architecture and Design, as experienced in the city of Paris. Using Paris as our classroom, students will visit well-known sites, museums and monuments as well as hidden gems as they explore this major world cultural center. While no art or drawing skills are required, participants at every level will learn how to improve their visual skills through sketching, observation studies and analyses. Each week students will complete a design project; each will explore a unique aspect of French culture. The course offers Global and Cultural Diversity credit and is open to undergraduate students and graduate students. There is no language requirement for this course. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

For more information, please visit the program website.

Dates: July 6-August 2, 2015

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: Course meets in Paris, France

Instructor: Sally Levine

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art Studio, New This Year, Study Abroad

BIOL 338/438: Ichthyology

Biology of fishes. Students will first develop fundamental understanding of the evolutionary history and systematics of fishes to provide a context within which they can address diverse aspects of biology including anatomy, physiology (e.g., in species that change sex; osmoregulation in freshwater vs. saltwater), and behavior (e.g. visual, auditory, chemical, electric communication; social structures). Finally, this knowledge will be used to explore the biodiversity of fishes around the world, with emphasis on Ohio species, by examining preserved specimens in class and making two local field trips to (1) observe captive living specimens, and (2) to observe, capture, and identify wild fishes in their natural habitats. The course will conclude with an analysis of the current global fisheries crisis that has resulted from human activities. Fishes will be used to address broad topics in ecology and evolutionary biology that transcend the pure study of ichthyology. Recommended preparation for BIOL 438: BIOL 216. Offered as BIOL 338 and BIOL 438. Prereq: BIOL 216 or BIOL 251.

Dates: May 11-29, 2015

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p; Afternoon Laboratory times TBD

Instructor: Ronald Oldfield

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Biology, New This Year

CLSC 326/426: Rome on Site; The Archaeology of the Eternal City

This course offers the opportunity to examine firsthand Roman remains spanning 500 years of the city’s history. For three weeks we will explore all sections of Rome and discover how different spheres of Roman life, such as religion, politics, leisure, and death, combined to shape one of the most renowned cityscapes of the ancient Mediterranean world. The course constitutes a mix of museum and site visits to expose us to the artifacts that help us interpret the Roman world, including art and other types of material culture, and the monumental architecture dominating much of Rome to this day. We will also explore important sites outside of the city, including Rome’s remarkably well-preserved port at Ostia, the Emperor Hadrian’s magnificent villa at Tivoli, and an optional visit to Pompeii and Herculaneum during an extended weekend. Some of the questions we will be asking when visiting the sites include: How did the expansion of the Roman Empire influence the stylistic repertories of the capital’s artists and architects? How did the changing political environment shape the topography of the city from Republic to Empire? How can we read political messages and propaganda in the ancient structures? How did (and does) Rome live among, use, and reuse ancient remains? Students will be expected to be active participants in the daily tours. All students will be presenting on various structures as we come to them (topics to be assigned in advance of the trip). Graduate students are responsible for leading a day tour (with my assistance) – to create the itinerary and develop the thematic framework. Grades will be based on participation on site, presentations, and a paper. Offered as CLSC 326 and CLSC 426. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

For more information, please visit the course website.

Dates: May 12-31, 2015

Session: May Term

Time: Course meets in Rome

Instructor: Kevin Dicus

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Classics, New This Year, Study Abroad

EEPS 115: Introduction to Oceanography

The sciences of oceanography. Physical, chemical, biologic, and geologic features and processes of the oceans. Differences and similarities between the oceans and large lakes including the Great Lakes. A Saturday or Sunday field trip will be required and scheduled.

Dates: June 15-July 27, 2015

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 4:00-5:20p

Instructor: Gerry Matisoff

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences, New This Year

EMAC 461: Chemistry of Fire Safe Polymers and Composites

Chemistry of Fire Safe Polymers and Composites starts with the introduction of characterization techniques used for fire safe materials and combustion phenomena research. General discussion on how reduced flammability of polymers and composites are obtained, for example by additives and preparing intrinsically thermally stable chemical structure and some examples of smart approaches, will be discussed. It also discusses the synthetic methods of preparing high temperature stable polymers in addition to the raw materials used to prepare those materials. Special emphasis will be placed on the thermal stability data obtained by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and combustion calorimetry for those fire safe materials. Mechanistic aspects of the flammability of polymers will be explained with special emphasis on the molar contribution of chemical functionality to the heat release capacity. Theoretical derivation of thermokinetic parameters will be explained. In addition, a common sense build-up will be attempted by providing actual numbers associated with those thermokinetic parameters. Upon completion of background formation, a more advanced materials, composites and nanocomposites, will be discussed using the results recently reported. Preliminary attempts to explain flame retardation by nanocomposite structures will also be discussed. Offered as EMAC 461 and EMAE 461.

Dates: June 1-26, 2015

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TBD

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Macromolecular Science and Engineering, New This Year

EMAE 461: Chemistry of Fire Safe Polymers and Composites

Chemistry of Fire Safe Polymers and Composites starts with the introduction of characterization techniques used for fire safe materials and combustion phenomena research. General discussion on how reduced flammability of polymers and composites are obtained, for example by additives and preparing intrinsically thermally stable chemical structure and some examples of smart approaches, will be discussed. It also discusses the synthetic methods of preparing high temperature stable polymers in addition to the raw materials used to prepare those materials. Special emphasis will be placed on the thermal stability data obtained by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and combustion calorimetry for those fire safe materials. Mechanistic aspects of the flammability of polymers will be explained with special emphasis on the molar contribution of chemical functionality to the heat release capacity. Theoretical derivation of thermokinetic parameters will be explained. In addition, a common sense build-up will be attempted by providing actual numbers associated with those thermokinetic parameters. Upon completion of background formation, a more advanced materials, composites and nanocomposites, will be discussed using the results recently reported. Preliminary attempts to explain flame retardation by nanocomposite structures will also be discussed. Offered as EMAC 461 and EMAE 461.

Dates: June 1-26, 2015

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TBD

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, New This Year

ENGL 368C/468C: Topics in Film: Asian Cinemas: Animation, Martial Arts, Comedy

Individual topics in film.

For Summer 2015, ¨Topics in Film” will look at films as examples of three key genres in Asian Cinema: the animated film, martial arts films, and comedy. In particular, we will analyze films from the People’s Republic of China, Korea, Japan, and Hong Kong.  Offered as ENGL 368C, WLIT 368C, ENGL 468C, and WLIT 468C. Students may take up to 12 credit hours of ENGL/WLIT 368C/468C  (i.e. 4 offerings of Topics in Film) but each course must be a different topic.

Extended class times on Tuesdays and Thursdays to accommodate film showings.

 

Dates: May 11-29, 2015

Session: May Term

Time: MWF 9:30a-12:00p; TuTh 9:30a-1:00p

Instructor: Linda Ehrlich

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, New This Year

ENGR 200T: Statics and Strength of Materials in Tianjin, China

An introduction to the analysis, behavior and design of mechanical/structural systems. Course topics include: concepts of equilibrium; geometric properties and distributed forces; stress, strain and mechanical properties of materials; and, linear elastic behavior of elements.Prereq: PHYS 121.

 

For more information, please visit the course website.

Dates: May 25-June 11, 2015

Session: May Term

Time: Course meets in Tianjin, China

Instructor: David Zeng

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Engineering, New This Year, Study Abroad

ENGR 333: Hybridity: Interaction Between Art & Engineering

We live in a culture of unprecedented access to information, new ideas, materials, and technologies. At a moment in history defined by ubiquitous technology and ever-accelerating change, collaboration promises a future where meaningful innovation is sustainable. Whether virtual or tangible, a predominance of new and novel ideas will be derived through interaction, and expressed by hybridity. This is an important initiative that connects CIA and CWRU.
This is a seminar-studio (hybrid) designed to provide opportunities to discuss and explore emerging frontiers shared by art and engineering, from new materials and technologies, to collaboration and design thinking. Students from the Cleveland Institute of Art and Case Western Reserve University will work together to discuss, reveal, and explore ways of thinking and working, through the seminar and project-based studio. We will explore the influence of collaboration and the hybrid on research, creativity, ideation, design, and making.
New technologies and materials provide an exciting range of possibilities for prototypes, models, molds, and parts toward a wide range of “making.” The seminar-studio will address the concepts, practices, and technologies of contemporary hybrid activity as interactions between art and engineering, and will include work in think[box}, the studios of the CIA, and service bureaus.

Dates: May 11-29, 2015

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:00a-3:00p

Instructor: Malcolm Cooke

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Engineering, New This Year

ETHS 306: The Cuban Experience: an immersion in its culture and society

This is a three week study-abroad intensive course that takes place at Editorial Vigía, in Matanzas, Cuba. The course combines the unique advantages of a total immersion environment in Spanish with a classroom curriculum that includes conversation practice and study of relevant cultural, literary and historical issues. Students complete three hours of classroom instruction and an hour and a half of publishing workshop four days per week. In this workshop, they work in the edition of a bilingual book. In addition, they participate in organized visits to historic sites and museums connected to the culture curriculum. The focus of the culture curriculum is the study of Cuban history and culture through its literature, visual arts, films, and music. After applying and being accepted in the program, students meet for personal advising with the program director and attend four different one hour orientation-information meetings in the spring semester. After successful completion of the study-abroad program, students receive 3 upper-level credits in Spanish. The course is interdisciplinary in approach and provides students with the tools they need to analyze and understand the complexities of modern Cuba. Students will have formal classes taught by their professor and talks and meetings with specialists on Cuban literature, art, architecture, history and other aspects of culture and society. In addition, they will attend lectures, participate in discussions, and take field trips that will expose them to many aspects of Cuban culture, such as art, architecture, music, dance, film, literature, artisan work, folklore, history and urban growth. Offered as SPAN 306, SPAN 406, and ETHS 306. Prereq: SPAN 202.

 

For more information, please visit the course website.

Dates: May 9-June 1, 2015

Session: May Term

Time: Course meets in Cuba

Instructor: Damaris Punales-Alpizar

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Ethnic Studies, New This Year, Study Abroad

ITAL 308: The Italian Experience

A three-week summer study abroad course spent at a university in an Italian city well-known for its cultural and linguistic heritage and at other important sites during travel. Focus: Language immersion and processing of cultural experience. Main features: 1. Intense collaboration with an Italian university. Students interact with Italian peers; seminars are co-taught by Italian faculty. 2. Creation of an individual journal that synthesizes students’ perception of and reflections on their experience, records the progress of their final project, and documents their improvement in language proficiency. 3. Final project. Students meet M-F in a formal setting for advanced language study designed to improve proficiency in speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. They attend seminars on varied topics in literature, history, and civilization. Visits to museums, galleries, and attendance at cultural events are included.Prereq: ITAL 202 or equivalent.

 

For more information, please visit the course website.

Dates: May 10-31, 2015

Session: May Term

Time: Course meets in Italy

Instructor: Denise Caterinacci

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New This Year, Study Abroad

PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy

Basic problems of philosophy and methods of philosophical thinking. Problems raised by science, morality, religion, politics, and art. Readings from classical and contemporary philosophers. Normally given in multiple sections with different instructors and possibly with different texts. All sections share core materials in theory of knowledge, metaphysics, and ethics despite differences that may exist in emphasis.

Dates: June 1-26, 2015

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTuWTh 1:00-3:15p

Instructor: Chris Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Philosophy

POSC 380B: Uprising and Political Change in the Arab World

This course explores political and social change in the Arab World with an emphasis on the 2011 uprisings. It is designed as a three week program taking place in Jordan. Since the early 20th century, the 22 countries that comprise the Arab World have experienced multifaceted and rapid change. Coups, revolts, and revolution defined much of the 1950s and 1960s. In the ensuing decades, however, Arab politics settled into seemingly stable political authoritarianism. Thus, it was a surprise when mobilized protestors unseated some leaders in 2011. The primary question for scholars and students is, what explains these momentous events? And what happens after?

This course will take up these questions by carefully examining political and social change in the decades before 2011. By holding the course in Jordan, students will be able to place the broad themes within a local context. Investigation and lectures will explore not just the history of change and protest but why protest succeeded in removing leaders in some countries yet was defeated in others. The ultimate goal is for students to gain the skills to pursue these questions at a macro-scholarly level as well as unpack those same questions at a local and regional level. Guest lectures, a visit to the Royal Court, meetings with opposition figures, and field trips are designed as far more than just visits. Each event will require students to inquire, converse, and research local conditions to address the larger questions. Primary course requirements include a daily journal, a short exam, and a final paper.

This course will be conducted and housed at the American Center of Oriental Research (ACOR), one of the largest and most prestigious American research institutes in the world. Professor Moore has over twenty years of experience living and conducting research in Jordan.

 

For more information, please visit the course website.

For a link to the Education Abroad website with course information, please click here.

Dates: May 11-29, 2015

Session: May Term

Time: Course meets in Jordan

Instructor: Pete Moore

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Political Science, Study Abroad

POSC 389/489: Special Topics: The Battle of the Budget

This one-time course focuses on the major conflict in American politics today. Budgeting is where promises meet price tags and government decides who gets what, when and how. Federal budgeting involves Congress and the President in conflict over the Power of the Purse, the political parties representing different views of what kind of country this should be, and organized interests, from the elderly to the military to physicians, struggling to gain more or protect what they have. This course will cover the economic consequences of budget choices, the policy disputes, and the political forces that shape the results.

Dates: July 6-31, 2015

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 10:30a-12:45p

Instructor: Joseph White

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Political Science

POSC 391/491: Topics in Comparative Politics: Scotland, Quebec and Catalunya; Separation, Referenda and Nationalism

This course builds from Professor Beckwith’s experience as a Fulbright Scotland Visiting Professor during the run-up to the Scottish Independence Referendum, and compares the experience of Scotland to that of Quebec (separation referenda in 1980, 1995) and Catalonia, which has a strong separation movement and is currently awaiting the Spanish Constitutional Court’s ruling on the legality of a Catalonian separation referendum. The course will consider the structural and cultural forces that shape opportunities for national movements within single countries and lead to demands for separation referenda.

Books for the course include Alasdair Gray et al., Independence: An Argument for Home Rule, and Gordon Brown, My Scotland, Our Britain: A Future Worth Sharing, as well as other books and articles on federalism, unitary states, and nationalist separation movements.

Dates: May 11-29, 2015

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Karen Beckwith

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Political Science

PSCL 321: Abnormal Psychology

Major syndromes of mental disorders, their principal symptoms, dynamics, etiology, and treatment. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 15-July 27, 2015

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MWF 1:00-3:00p

Instructor: Todd McCallum

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Psychological Sciences

PSCL 353: Psychology of Learning

The basic methods in the study of learning. The major theories proposed to account for the learning process. Development of the fundamental concepts and principles governing the learning process in both humans and lower animal. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 15-July 27, 2015

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 4:30-6:30p

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Psychological Sciences

PSCL 375: Research Design and Analysis

Conceptual and methodological issues confronted by the behavioral scientist conducting research. Major experimental designs and statistical procedures. Intuitive understanding of the mathematical operations. Recommended preparation: PSCL 282. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

Dates: June 15-July 27, 2015

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MW 9:00a-12:00p

Instructor: Amy Przeworski

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Psychological Sciences

RLGN 206: Religion and Ecology

This course offers a cross-cultural exploration of different religious perspectives on nature and ecology, focusing on the mutually influential relationship between religion and ecology. On the one hand, we can’t talk about religion without talking about ecology. Religions don’t just drop into the world from on high; they emerge within particular environmental contexts, and these contexts shape them in profound ways. On the other hand, we can’t talk about ecology without talking about religion. Religion shapes the ways people think and act in relation to the nonhuman natural world, often in powerful yet subconscious ways. Particular ethical and political responses to current environmental issues and crises, for example, are often shaped by religious perspectives and values. If we interpret the biblical book of Revelation as saying that the world will soon end in a fiery or watery apocalypse, how might that influence our responses to climate change and long-term human survival on the planet? Or if we interpret Genesis 2 as saying that animals are spiritual beings, created by God just as people are, how might that influence our view of industrial slaughterhouses? In this course, then, we will explore the interdependence of ecology and religion in both directions: the ecological rootedness of religious traditions, ideas, and practices; and religious influences on contemporary environmental ideas, ethics, and politics. Particular themes include: ecology of chaos, urban ecology, the idea of wilderness, and debates about the role of the Bible and Christianity in our current ecological crises. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

Longer Wednesday classes accommodate field trips.

Dates: July 6-31, 2015

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTh 1:00-3:00p; W 1:00-6:00p

Instructor: Timothy Beal

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Religious Studies

SOCI 208: Dating, Marriage and Family

What is the family today? How has it changed over the last century? How will it change in the future? This course aims to answer these questions as it explores the influences of work, education, government, health and religion on today’s changing families. The course considers the factors that affect mate selection. It also examines parenting, roles of husbands and wives, and family dysfunction, and divorce.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2015

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuW 10:30a-12:50p

Instructor: Karie Feldman

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, Sociology

SPAN 306/406: The Cuban Experience: an immersion in its culture and society

This is a three week study-abroad intensive course that takes place at Editorial Vigía, in Matanzas, Cuba. The course combines the unique advantages of a total immersion environment in Spanish with a classroom curriculum that includes conversation practice and study of relevant cultural, literary and historical issues. Students complete three hours of classroom instruction and an hour and a half of publishing workshop four days per week. In this workshop, they work in the edition of a bilingual book. In addition, they participate in organized visits to historic sites and museums connected to the culture curriculum. The focus of the culture curriculum is the study of Cuban history and culture through its literature, visual arts, films, and music. After applying and being accepted in the program, students meet for personal advising with the program director and attend four different one hour orientation-information meetings in the spring semester. After successful completion of the study-abroad program, students receive 3 upper-level credits in Spanish. The course is interdisciplinary in approach and provides students with the tools they need to analyze and understand the complexities of modern Cuba. Students will have formal classes taught by their professor and talks and meetings with specialists on Cuban literature, art, architecture, history and other aspects of culture and society. In addition, they will attend lectures, participate in discussions, and take field trips that will expose them to many aspects of Cuban culture, such as art, architecture, music, dance, film, literature, artisan work, folklore, history and urban growth. Offered as SPAN 306, SPAN 406, and ETHS 306. Prereq: SPAN 202.

For more information, please visit the course website.

Dates: May 9-June 1, 2015

Session: May Term

Time: Course meets in Cuba

Instructor: Damaris Punales-Alpizar

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New This Year, Study Abroad

USSO 288T: Coffee and Civilization

Whether you enjoy an occasional cup or sip throughout the day from a bottomless mug, did you know that since its introduction in the Western world coffee has been intimately tied to sociability and intellectual life? In this seminar, we will explore coffee’s civilizing history, from eighteenth-century coffee houses buzzing with political dissent, to 1920s establishments crowded with avant-garde artists and our modern bookstore cafés. We will also explore the human and ecological costs of our taste for coffee by investigating the enduring connections between coffee, slavery, North-South geo-political relations, and notions of fair trade.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2015

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 10:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Annie Pecastaings

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, SAGES

USSY 291H: Radical Children’s Literature

What is the first book you remember reading? For most people, their earliest memories are tied to picture books that were read to them or that they encountered in their earliest schooling. These books not only introduce children to basic words and images, but they also educated children about their cultures’ belief systems. In this course, we will take seemingly simplistic picture books, including The Cat in the Hat, Where the Wild Things Are, and The Three Pigs, and analyze the underlying messages and the “hidden adult” present in their illustrations and text. We will engage with different theoretical approaches towards children’s literature, including visual rhetoric, race studies, psychoanalysis, and adaptation theory, as we analyze the illustrations, text, and history of American children’s literature. The key questions we will explore and answer together include: What is the function of visual rhetoric in children’s literature? What assumptions are made about the readers of picture books? What roles do adults play in the creation and dissemination of these works? How do these books adapt and transmit cultural beliefs?

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2015

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuTh 6:00-8:30

Instructor: Cara Byrne

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, SAGES

WLIT 368C/468C: Topics in Film: Asian Cinemas: Animation, Martial Arts, Comedy

Individual topics in film.

For Summer 2015, ¨Topics in Film” will look at films as examples of three key genres in Asian Cinema: the animated film, martial arts films, and comedy. In particular, we will analyze films from the People’s Republic of China, Korea, Japan, and Hong Kong.  Offered as ENGL 368C, WLIT 368C, ENGL 468C, and WLIT 468C. Students may take up to 12 credit hours of ENGL/WLIT 368C/468C  (i.e. 4 offerings of Topics in Film) but each course must be a different topic.

Extended class times on Tuesdays and Thursdays to accommodate film showings.

Dates: May 11-29, 2015

Session: May Term

Time: MWF 9:00a-12:00p; TuTh 9:00a-1:00p

Instructor: Linda Ehrlich

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New This Year, World Literature