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8 Week Session Courses


ARTH 101: Art History I: Pyramids to Pagodas

The first half of a two-semester survey of world art highlighting the major monuments of the ancient Mediterranean, medieval Europe, MesoAmerica, Africa, and Asia. Special emphasis on visual analysis, and socio-cultural contexts, and objects in the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 10:30-12:00

Instructor: Russell Green

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, New 2019 Summer

ARTS 220: Photography I

Camera, film, and darkroom techniques. Development of basic black and white perceptual and photographic skills. Darkroom and photographic field and lab work. 35mm camera required.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TR 1:00-4:00

Instructor: Jerry Birchfield

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

ASTR 105: Introduction to Einstein’s Universe

This course is a descriptive introduction for the non-science major to Einstein’s Special and General Theories of Relativity and how these theories have fundamentally altered our understanding of the universe. Topics discussed will include: time dilation, length contraction, the twin paradox, the warping of space-time, white dwarf stars, neutron stars, black holes, the structure and evolution of the universe. No mathematical background beyond simple algebra is needed. This course has no pre-requisites.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 10:30 -12:00

Instructor: Jeffrey Kriessler

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Astronomy, New 2019 Summer

DSCI 352/452: Applied Data Science Research

This is a project based data science research class, in which project teams identify a research project under the guidance of a domain expert professor. The research is structured as a data analysis project including the 6 steps of developing a reproducible data science project, including 1: Define the ADS question, 2: Identify, locate, and/or generate the data 3: Exploratory data analysis 4: Statistical modeling and prediction 5: Synthesizing the results in the domain context 6: Creation of reproducible research, Including code, datasets, documentation and reports.  During the course special topic lectures will include Ethics, Privacy, Openness, Security, Ethics. Value.  Offered as DSCI 352 and DSCI 452.  Prereq: (DSCI 133 or DSCI 134 or ENGR 131 or EECS 132) and (STAT 312R or STAT 201R or SYBB 310 or PQHS/EPBI 431 or OPRE 207) and (DSCI 351 or (SYBB 311A and SYBB 311B and SYBB 311C and SYBB 311D) or SYBB 321 or MKMR 201).

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 12:30-2:00

Instructor: Laura Bruckman

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Materials Science & Engineering

ECHE 305: Topics in Chemical Engineering

Topics in chemical engineering will be covered in an independent study mode. Readings and homework assignments will be assigned. Students are graded on the basis of homework assignments and a final exam.

 

 

Dates: June 24-August 23, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Instructor: Daniel Lacks

Credits: 1-3 credits

Department: Chemical Engineering

EECS 233: Introduction to Data Structures

The programming language Java; pointers, files, and recursion. Representation and manipulation of data: one way and circular linked lists, doubly linked lists; the available space list. Different representations of stacks and queues. Representation of binary trees, trees and graphs. Hashing; searching and sorting.  Prereq: EECS 132.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTW 9:30-11:30

Instructor: Chris Fietkiewicz

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS 246: Signals and Systems

Mathematical representation, characterization, and analysis of continuous-time signals and systems.  Development of elementary mathematical models of continuous-time dynamic systems.  Time domain and frequency domain analysis of linear time-invariant systems.  Fourier series, Fourier transforms, and Laplace transforms.  Sampling theorem.  Filter design.  Introduction to feedback control systems and feedback controller design.  Prereq: ENGR 210. Prereq or Coreq: MATH 224.

 

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 2:45-4:45

Instructor: Marc Buchner

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS 246: Signals and Systems

Mathematical representation, characterization, and analysis of continuous-time signals and systems.  Development of elementary mathematical models of continuous-time dynamic systems.  Time domain and frequency domain analysis of linear time-invariant systems.  Fourier series, Fourier transforms, and Laplace transforms.  Sampling theorem.  Filter design.  Introduction to feedback control systems and feedback controller design.  Prereq: ENGR 210. Prereq or Coreq: MATH 224.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 2:45-4:45

Instructor: Vira Chankong

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS 398: Engineering Projects I

Capstone course for electrical, computer and systems and control engineering seniors.  Material from previous and concurrent courses used to solve engineering design problems.  Professional engineering topics such as project management, engineering design, communications, and professional ethics.  Requirements include periodic reporting of progress, plus a final oral presentation and written report.  Scheduled formal project presentations during last week of classes.  Prereq or Coreq: ENGR 398 and ENGL 398.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: T 11:00-12:00

Instructor: Sree Sreenath

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS 399: Engineering Projects II

Continuation of EECS 398.  Material from previous and concurrent courses applied to engineering design and research.  Requirements include periodic reporting of progress, plus a final oral presentation and written report.  Prereq: Senior Standing.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: T 11:00-12:00

Instructor: Sree Sreenath

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EMAE 181: Dynamics

Elements of classical dynamics: particle kinematics and dynamics, including concepts of force, mass, acceleration, work, energy, impulse, momentum. Kinetics of systems of particles and of rigid bodies, including concepts of mass center, momentum, mass moment of inertia, dynamic equilibrium. Elementary vibrations. Recommended preparation: MATH 122 and PHYS 121 and ENGR 200.

Distance Learning Section (ITN) also offered.  Please see Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWRF 9:00-10:20

Instructor: Richard Bachmann

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Online

EMAE 250: Computers in Mechanical Engineering

Numerical methods including analysis and control of error and its propagation, solutions of systems of linear algebraic equations, solutions of nonlinear algebraic equations, curve fitting, interpolation, and numerical integration and differentiation. Recommended preparation: ENGR 131 and MATH 122.

Distance Learning Section (ITN) also offered.  Please see Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWRF 11:00-12:20

Instructor: Richard Bachmann

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Online

ENGL 180: Writing Tutorial

English 180 is a one-credit writing tutorial class designed to develop students’ expository writing skills through weekly scheduled conferences with a Writing Resource Center Instructor. Goals are to produce clear, well-organized, and mechanically-acceptable prose, and to demonstrate learned writing skills throughout the term. Course content is highly individualized based on the instructor’s initial assessment of the student’s writing, and the student’s individual concerns. All students must produce a minimum of 12 pages of finished writing, and complete other assignments as designated by the instructor.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Instructor: Megan Jewell

Credits: 1 credit

Department: English

ENGL 203: Introduction to Creative Writing

A course exploring basic issues and techniques of writing narrative prose and verse through exercises, analysis, and experiment. For students who wish to try their abilities across a spectrum of genres.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: English

ENGL 370: Comics and the Graphic Novel

Selected topics in the study and analysis of comics and the graphic novel. Topics may include historical contexts of the genre, visual rhetoric, thematic developments, influence of literature, adaptations into film. A student may not receive credit for both ENGL 370 and ENGL 370C.
Offered as ENGL 370, ENGL 370C, and ENGL 470.

Prerequisite: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, or FSCS.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, New 2019 Summer

ENGR 131: Elementary Computer Programming

Students will learn the fundamentals of computer programming and algorithmic problem solving.  Concepts are illustrated using a wide range of examples from engineering, science, and other disciplines.  Students learn how to create, debug, and test computer programs, and how to develop algorithmic solution to problems and write programs that implement those solutions.  Matlab is the primary programming language used in this course, but other languages may be introduced or used throughout.   Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:30-11:50

Instructor: Amir Sajadi

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 145: Chemistry of Materials

Application of fundamental chemistry principles to materials. Emphasis is on bonding and how this relates to the structure and properties in metals, ceramics, polymers and electronic materials. Application of chemistry principles to develop an understanding of how to synthesize materials.   Prereq: CHEM 111 or equivalent.

 

Distance learning section (ITN) available. Check Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTW 1:30-3:30; R 1:30-2:30

Instructor: Peter Lagerlof

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Engineering, Online

ENGR 210: Introduction to Circuits and Instrumentation

Modeling and circuit analysis of analog and digital circuits.  Fundamental concepts in circuit analysis: voltage and current sources, Kirchhoff’s Laws, Thevenin, and Norton equivalent circuits, inductors capacitors, and transformers.  Modeling sensors and amplifiers and measuring DC device characteristics.  Characterization and measurement of time dependent waveforms.  Transient behavior of circuits.  Frequency dependent behavior of devices and amplifiers, frequency measurements.  AC power and power measurements.  Electronic devices as switches.  Prereq: MATH 122. Prereq or Coreq: PHYS 122.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTW 2:30-4:30; Lab TBD

Instructor: Christian Zorman

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 225: Thermodynamics, Fluid Dynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer

Elementary thermodynamic concepts: first and second laws, and equilibrium. Basic fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and mass transfer: microscopic and macroscopic perspectives.  Prereq: CHEM 111, ENGR 145, and PHYS 121. Coreq: MATH 223.

 

Distance Learning Section (ITN) also offered.  Check Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 4:00-6:00; REC M 4:00-5:55

Instructor: Paul Barnhart

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Engineering, Online

HSTY 306/406: History Museums: Theory and Reality

This course is an intensive summer internship (10 hours per week) at the Western Reserve Historical Society, complemented by extensive readings in museum/archival theory and public historical perception. It is designed both to introduce students to museum/archival work and to compare theoretical concepts with actual museum situations. Interns will be assigned a specific project within one of the Society’s curatorial or administrative divisions, but will have the opportunity to work on ancillary tasks throughout the Historical Society’s headquarters in University Circle. Offered as HSTY 306 and HSTY 406.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Instructor: John Grabowski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

MATH 121: Calculus for Science and Engineering I

Functions, analytic geometry of lines and polynomials, limits, derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Definite integral, antiderivatives, fundamental theorem of calculus, change of variables. Recommended preparation: Three and one half years of high school mathematics. Credit for at most one of MATH 121, MATH 123 and MATH 125 can be applied to hours required for graduation.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 8:45-10:15

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics, New 2019 Summer

MATH 122: Calculus for Science and Engineering II

Continuation of MATH 121. Exponentials and logarithms, growth and decay, inverse trigonometric functions, related rates, basic techniques of integration, area and volume, polar coordinates, parametric equations. Taylor polynomials and Taylor’s theorem.  Prereq: MATH 121, MATH 123 or MATH 126.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 8:45-10:15

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 126: Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci II

Continuation of MATH 125 covering differential equations, multivariable calculus, discrete methods. Partial derivatives, maxima and minima for functions of two variables, linear regression. Differential equations; first and second order equations, systems, Taylor series methods; Newton’s method; difference equations. Prereq: MATH 121, MATH 123 or MATH 125.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 8:45-10:15

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 201: Introduction to Linear Algebra for Applications

Matrix operations, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, subspaces, bases and linear independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization of matrices, linear transformations, determinants. Less theoretical than MATH 308. May not be taken for credit by mathematics majors. Only one of MATH 201 or MATH 308 may be taken for credit. Prereq: MATH 122, MATH 124 or MATH 126.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:30-11:45

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 223: Calculus for Science and Engineering III

Introduction to vector algebra; lines and planes. Functions of several variables: partial derivatives, gradients, chain rule, directional derivative, maxima/minima. Multiple integrals, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Derivatives of vector valued functions, velocity and acceleration. Vector fields, line integrals, Green’s theorem. Prereq: MATH 122 or MATH 124.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 9:00-10:15

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 224: Elementary Differential Equations

A first course in ordinary differential equations. First order equations and applications, linear equations with constant coefficients, linear systems, Laplace transforms, numerical methods of solution. Prereq: MATH 223 or MATH 227.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 9:00-10:15

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MUGN 201: Introduction to Music: Listening Experience I

A flexible approach to the study of the materials and literature of music. Aural and analytical skills primarily for classical music.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 10:30-12:00

Instructor: Eric Charnofsky

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Music, New 2019 Summer

USNA 285: The Science of Madness: An Historical Investigation of Mental Illness

Since antiquity the western world’s understanding of mental illness has continued to evolve. This course will examine the trajectory of that evolution, looking at the medical theories that have influenced assumptions about the causes and treatments of mental illness from the early modern era through the twenty-first century. Examples of questions we will investigate include: How we have defined the normal and the pathological in human mental behavior over time? How do we explain the centuries-old correlation that medicine has made between creativity and mental illness? Which past and present psychiatric treatments have been beneficial and which harmful? How did Darwin’s theory of evolution affect theories of mental illness (and how does it continue to do so with the advent of evolutionary psychology)? How have changing philosophies of science affected the research and practice of psychology? How and why do the sciences of the mind–psychiatry, psychoanalysis, clinical psychology, psychopharmacology, the cognitive neurosciences–claim so much scientific authority and exert influence over our lives today? As a frame work for this inquiry, the class will use the concept of paradigm shifts as Thomas Kuhn defines in his classic work, the Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Prereq: Passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSNA, FSCC, FSSO, FSSY or FSCS. Prereq or Coreq: FSTS 100.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 4:00-5:30

Instructor: Barbara Burgess-Van Aken

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSO 291X: “We’re Dying in America”: The History of the U.S. AIDS Crisis

Thirty-seven years have passed since the summer of 1981, when the Centers for Disease Control published a report on the mysterious deaths of five previously-healthy gay men. In that time, more than thirty-nine million people have died of AIDS around the globe. Approximately 600,000 of those people died in the United States; at least 10,000 more Americans will die this year. Why, given the global scope of the crisis and the dramatic impact it has had on US society and culture, do so few students learn about the AIDS crisis in school? Why does it receive less attention than, for example, terrorism? In this course, we will study the first 20 years of the United States’ AIDS crisis, and use what we learn to contemplate the current status of HIV-positive people and people with AIDS. We will examine the origins of AIDS as a biological, political, and cultural phenomenon in the hopes of understanding why the United States experienced the virus as it did. We will also address the myriad responses to the virus by presidents and preachers, artists and activists, doctors and business people. How did this tragedy impact American politics and culture? What lessons did we learn, and what mistakes are we still repeating today? How can (and should) the history of AIDS inform our response to the opioid crisis, or the battle over Obamacare? Are we ready for the next epidemic?

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 12:00-1:30

Instructor: Andrea Milne

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, SAGES

USSO 291J: Narratives of Immigration

As one of the most pressing issues of the twenty-first century, immigration has captured the imagination of politicians and authors alike. In this class, we will explore the stories of those who have migrated to the United States. We will analyze how various writers create autobiographical and fictional narratives of migration, addressing issues such as adjusting to different cultures, learning new languages, and adapting to new environments. Through these stories and histories, we will ask broader questions about immigration, including: is migration a basic human right? Is it ethical to define someone as being “illegal” for peacefully working and living in a different country from where they were born? What are the gendered, ethnic, cultural, and racial barriers that exist when migrating between countries? What are the cost(s) of citizenship and embracing a new country as one’s home? As the United States is largely seen as a nation of immigrants, how have immigrants’ stories perpetuated or undermined this reputation?

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWR 2:30-4:00

Instructor: Cara Byrne

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSY 286U: Puzzled

“Puzzled” will look at the practice of puzzle making and puzzle-solving and explore the meaning of puzzles for different cultures throughout history. We will read works from the disciplines of math, history, anthropology, philosophy, and literature. We will explore why certain types of puzzles became popular and how puzzles have transferred from one culture to another. We will examine the role of code writing and code-breaking in the military and in the world of business. We will read examples of fiction and watch films that adopt the form of the puzzle as a narrative device. We will think about the function of puzzles as instruments to exercise the faculties of reason and logic and as a means of leisure or pleasant distraction.

Students will be asked to both solve and create puzzles over the course of the semester. They will write analytical essays on topics related to the practice and history of puzzle making and puzzle solving, and they will pursue a research topic that revolves around an issue or problem that has “puzzled” them.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 2:30-4:00

Instructor: Bernie Jim

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, SAGES

USSY 292Q: The Secret Lives of Animals

Animals are instructive. When we study animals, their biological makeups and creaturely habits, we do so with hopes of learning something about them. At the same time, such investigations often betray an interest in our human selves. The study of animals, in scientific and literary laboratories alike, quickly turns to acts of self-discovery: not what it means to be animal, exactly, but what it means to be human-animals. So what more could we learn by cultivating new strategies for listening and new languages for communicating with animals?

This seminar invites students to investigate the secret lives of animals as imagined in a sampling of classical, medieval and modern literatures. Thinking with animals past and present–in fables, manuals, and tales–we will examine human-animal relationships in imagined settings. Over the course of the semester, we will read, view, listen, and perform works in which animals are tasked with teaching moral lessons and testing the ethical obligations of their human audiences. Comparing treatments of companion animals past and present, we will reflect on the many ways literature can guide our evolving relationship to the animal kingdom.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTR 6:30-8:00

Instructor: Arthur Russell

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, SAGES

USSY 293I: High Art and Guilty Pleasures

How, and why, do we draw distinctions between art and entertainment? Lowbrow and highbrow? A crowd-pleasing “flick” and a critic-approved “film?” This seminar will explore the logic of this common sorting process, as well as its consequences. After all, such distinctions historically have been linked with other forms of discrimination–often amplifying or silencing certain voices on the basis of gender, race, or class. In this course we’ll investigate these connections between critical evaluation and broader social dynamics, while also engaging critically with our own tastes, values, and received ideas. What makes The Great Gatsby so great? Is there any value in keeping up with the Kardashians? Who determines the criteria that make one work a “classic,” the other a “guilty pleasure?” Traversing a range of artworks, novels, comics, and movies, we’ll work both the high and the low ends of the cultural spectrum, paying special attention to works that seem to blur or combine the usual categories–compelling us to ask whether great art and guilty pleasures can sometimes be one and the same.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWR 1:00-2:30

Instructor: Steve PInkerton

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, SAGES

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