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5 Week Session Courses


BIOL 215: Cells and Proteins

Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on membranes, energy conversion organelles and cytoskeleton); protein structure-function; enzyme kinetics, cellular energetics, and cell communication and motility strategies. Prereq: BIOL 214 and (CHEM 105 or CHEM 111). Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 106 or ENGR 145.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:00-11:45

Instructor: Dianne Kube

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 215L: Cells and Proteins Laboratory

Second in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics to include: protein structure-function, enzymes kinetics; cell structure; cellular energetics, respiration and photosynthesis. In addition, membrane structure and transport will be covered. Laboratory and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. This course is not available for students who have taken BIOL 215 as a 4-credit course. Prereq: BIOL 214L and Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 215.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: TR 1:00-4:00

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 216: Development and Physiology – Hybrid

This is the final class in the series of three courses required of the Biology major. As with the two previous courses, BIOL 214 and 215, this course is designed to provide an overview of fundamental biological processes. It will examine the complexity of interactions controlling reproduction, development and physiological function in animals. The Developmental Biology section will review topics such as gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, the genetic control of development, stem cells and cloning. Main topics included in the Physiology portion consist of: homeostasis, the function of neurons and nervous systems; the major organ systems and processes involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, temperature regulation, endocrine function and the immunologic response. There are two instructional modes for this course: lecture mode and hybrid mode. In the lecture mode students attend class for their instruction. In the hybrid mode students watch online lectures from the course instructor and attend discussion sections with the course instructor. The online content prepares students for the discussions.  The total student effort and course content is identical for both instructional modes. Either instructional mode fulfills the BIOL 216 requirement for the BA and BS in Biology. Prereq: BIOL 214.

*This section of BIOL 216 will be taught in the hybrid model. Due to the accelerated nature of the 5-week summer term, students are required to attend class every day (M-Th).*

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:00-11:45

Instructor: Rebecca Benard

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 302: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does the human brain learn?” Through assigned readings, extensive class discussions, and a major paper, each student will explore personal perspectives on learning. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: the brain’s cycle of learning; neocortex structure and function; emotion and limbic brain; synapse dynamics and changes in learning; images in cognition; symbolic brain (language, mathematics, music); memory formation; and creative thought and brain mechanisms. The major paper will be added to each student’s SAGES writing portfolio. In addition, near the end of the semester, each student will make an oral presentation on a chosen topic. Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 9:00-11:30

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 312: Introductory Plant Biology

This course will provide an overview of plant biology. Topics covered will include: (1) Plant structure, function and development from the cellular level to the whole plant (2) plant diversity, evolution of the bacteria, fungi, algae, bryophytes and vascular plants; (3) adaptations to their environment, plant-animal interactions, and human uses of plants. Prerequisite: (Undergraduate student and BIOL 215) or Requisites Not Met permission.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:00-11:45

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 343/443: Microbiology

The physiology, genetics, biochemistry, and diversity of microorganisms. The subject will be approached both as a basic biological science that studies the molecular and biochemical processes of cells and viruses, and as an applied science that examines the involvement of microorganisms in human disease as well as in workings of ecosystems, plant symbioses, and industrial processes. The course is divided into four major areas: bacteria, viruses, medical microbiology, and environmental and applied microbiology. Offered as BIOL 343 and BIOL 443. Prereq: BIOL 215 or BIOL 250.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 1:00-2:45

Instructor: Dianne Kube

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

CHEM 105: Principles of Chemistry I

Atomic structure; thermochemistry; periodicity, bonding and molecular structure; intermolecular forces; properties of solids; liquids, gases and solutions. Recommended preparation: One year of high school chemistry.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:30-12:20

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 223: Introductory Organic Chemistry I

Introductory course for science majors and engineering students. Develops themes of structure and bonding along with elementary reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers as well as an introduction to spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWRF 10:30-12:20

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 233: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 and CHEM 113 or equivalent. Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323. An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 and CHEM 113 or equivalent. Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 1:00-2:00

Instructor: Gregory Tochtrop

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 328/428: Introductory Biochemistry I

A survey of biochemistry with a strong emphasis on the chemical logic underlying metabolic pathways and the evolution of biomolecules. Cellular architecture. Amino acids and protein structure, purification, analysis, and synthesis. DNA, RNA, the flow of genetic information, and molecular biological technology. Enzyme kinetics, catalytic, and regulatory strategies. Sugars, complex carbohydrates, and glycoproteins. Lipids and cell membranes. Glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, carbon fixation through the “dark reactions” of photosynthesis, aerobic catabolism through the citric acid cycle, and glycogen metabolism. Biosynthesis and degradation of fatty acids, amino acids, and proteins. Offered as CHEM 328 and CHEM 428. Prereq: CHEM 224 or CHEM 324.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:30-12:20

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

COGS 322: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does the human brain learn?” Through assigned readings, extensive class discussions, and a major paper, each student will explore personal perspectives on learning. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: the brain’s cycle of learning; neocortex structure and function; emotion and limbic brain; synapse dynamics and changes in learning; images in cognition; symbolic brain (language, mathematics, music); memory formation; and creative thought and brain mechanisms. The major paper will be added to each student’s SAGES writing portfolio. In addition, near the end of the semester, each student will make an oral presentation on a chosen topic.
Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 9:00-11:30

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Cognitive Science

ETHS 393: Advanced Readings in the History of Race

This course examines the concept of race as a social construction that carries political and economic implications. We begin by examining the histories of the early racial taxonomists (e.g., Bernier, Linnaeus, and Blumenbach among others) and the contexts that informed their writings. We then assess how the concept of race changed from the nineteenth to the twentieth century in the United States. We conclude by evaluating how the ideology of race has influenced U.S. domestic life and foreign policy at specific historical moments.
Offered as HSTY 393, HSTY 493, and ETHS 393.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Ethnic Studies

HSTY 393: Advanced Readings in the History of Race

This course examines the concept of race as a social construction that carries political and economic implications. We begin by examining the histories of the early racial taxonomists (e.g., Bernier, Linnaeus, and Blumenbach among others) and the contexts that informed their writings. We then assess how the concept of race changed from the nineteenth to the twentieth century in the United States. We conclude by evaluating how the ideology of race has influenced U.S. domestic life and foreign policy at specific historical moments.
Offered as HSTY 393, HSTY 493, and ETHS 393.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Instructor: John Flores

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2019 Summer

PHYS 115: Introductory Physics I

First part of a two-semester sequence directed primarily towards students working towards a B.A. in science, with an emphasis on the life sciences. Kinematics; Newton’s laws; gravitation; simple harmonic motion; mechanical waves; fluids; ideal gas law; heat and the first and second laws of thermodynamics. This course has a laboratory component.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 9:30-11:20; lab MW 12:30-3:30

Instructor: Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 121: General Physics I – Mechanics

Particle dynamics, Newton’s laws of motion, energy and momentum conservation, rotational motion, and angular momentum conservation. This course has a laboratory component. Recommended preparation: MATH 121 or MATH 123 or MATH 125 or one year of high school calculus.

 

This course is co-taught by Harsh Mathur and Corbin Covault.  The laboratory is taught by Diana Driscoll.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 9:30-11:20; lab TR 12:30-3:30

Instructor: Corbin Covault, Harsh Mathur, Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PSCL 230: Child Psychology

Basic facts and principles of psychological development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: TR 9:00-12:30

Instructor: Rita Obeid

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, Psychological Sciences

PSCL 282: Quantitative Methods in Psychology

The theory and application of basic methods used in the analysis of psychological data. Not available for credit to students who have completed STAT 201 or ANTH 319. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTR 1:00-3:30

Instructor: Arin Connell

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 313: Psychology of Personality

The development and organization of personality; theories of personality and methods for assessing the person; problems of personal adjustment.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTW 1:00-3:30

Instructor: Amy Przeworski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 321: Abnormal Psychology

Major syndromes of mental disorders, their principal symptoms, dynamics, etiology, and treatment. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTW 9:00-11:30

Instructor: Amy Przeworski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

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