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May Term Courses


ANTH 102: Being Human: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

The nature of culture and humans as culture-bearing animals. The range of cultural phenomena including language, social organization, religion, and culture change, and the relevance of anthropology for contemporary social, economic, and ecological problems.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Jing Wang

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2018 Summer

BIOL 214: Genes, Ecology and Evolution

First in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on DNA and RNA); mitotic and meiotic cell cycles, gene expression, genetics, population genetics, evolution, biological diversity and ecology. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 111.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 10:000a-12:30p

Instructor: Deborah Harris

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 214L: Genes, Ecology and Evolution Laboratory

First in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (with a focus on DNA and RNA); basics of cell structure (with a focus on malaria research); molecular genetics, biotechnology; population genetics and evolution, ecology. Assignments will be in the form of a scientific journal submission. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 214.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: Lab: TuTh 1:00-4:00p; Discussion: MW 1:00-2:00p

Instructor: Deborah Harris

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 215: Cells and Proteins

Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on membranes, energy conversion organelles and cytoskeleton); protein structure-function; enzyme kinetics, cellular energetics, and cell communication and motility strategies. Prereq: BIOL 214 and (CHEM 105 or CHEM 111). Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 106 or ENGR 145.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Dianne Kube

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 215L: Cells and Proteins Laboratory

Second in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics to include: protein structure-function, enzymes kinetics; cell structure; cellular energetics, respiration and photosynthesis. In addition, membrane structure and transport will be covered. Laboratory and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. This course is not available for students who have taken BIOL 215 as a 4-credit course. Prereq: BIOL 214L and Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 215.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: Lab: TuTh 1:00-4:00p; Discussion: MW 1:00-2:00p

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 216: Development and Physiology

This is the final class in the series of three courses required of the Biology major. As with the two previous courses, BIOL 214 and 215, this course is designed to provide an overview of fundamental biological processes. It will examine the complexity of interactions controlling reproduction, development and physiological function in animals. The Developmental Biology section will review topics such as gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, the genetic control of development, stem cells and cloning. Main topics included in the Physiology portion consist of: homeostasis, the function of neurons and nervous systems; the major organ systems and processes involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, temperature regulation, endocrine function and the immunologic response.  Prereq: BIOL 214.

 

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:00-11:30a

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 216L: Development and Physiology Laboratory

Third in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Students will conduct laboratory experiments designed to provide hands-on, empirical laboratory experience in order to better understand the complex interactions governing the basic physiology and development of organisms. Laboratories and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. Prereq: BIOL 214L. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 216.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: TuTh 12:30-3:30p, MW 12:30-1:30p

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 312: Introductory Plant Biology

This course will provide an overview of plant biology. Topics covered will include: (1) Plant structure, function and development from the cellular level to the whole plant (2) plant diversity, evolution of the bacteria, fungi, algae, bryophytes and vascular plants; (3) adaptations to their environment, plant-animal interactions, and human uses of plants. Prerequisite for this course: undergraduate student and [Biol 215]; or [Requisites not met Permission].

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2018 Summer

CHEM 348/448: Chemistry of Fermentation and Brewing

To discern the molecular basis of fermentation and beer brewing, this course includes in-depth discussions of the chemistry underlying either an aspect of the brewing process or a style of beer (alt, kolsch, porter, bock, mead, ale, etc.).  The biochemistry of yeast fermentation, as well as mashing, lautering, boiling, conditioning, filtering, and packaging will be discussed.  There is no lab component (such as brewing beer), although field trips to the Jolly-Scholar pub (located on campus) will be part of the course, as well as invited speakers who have set up local microbreweries.  Each student will be expected to have basic background knowledge of chemistry, such as material taught in standard first year General Chemistry courses (CHEM 105, 106, and 111).  Lastly, the teacher of this course is a seasoned chemistry professor who has extensive experience with brewing beer!

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Michael Zagorski

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Chemistry, New 2018 Summer

EBME 370: Principles of Biomedical Engineering Design

Students learn and implement the design process to produce working prototypes of medical devices with potential commercial value to meet significant clinical needs.  Critical examination of contemporary medical problems is used to develop a specific problem statement.  The class is divided into teams of 3 to 4 students.  Each team integrates their knowledge and skills to design a device to meet their clinical need.  Project planning and management, including resource allocation, milestones, and documentation, are required to ensure successful completion of projects within the allotted time and budget.  Formal design reviews by a panel of advisors and outside medical device experts are required every four weeks.  Every student is required to give oral presentations at each formal review and is responsible for formal documentation of the design process, resulting in an executive summary and complete design history file of the project.  The course culminates with a public presentation of the team’s device to a panel of experts.  This course is expected to provide the student with a real-world, capstone design experience.team’s device to a panel of experts.  This course is expected to provide the student with a real-world, capstone design experience.  Recommended preparation: EBME 310

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Colin Drummond

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Biomedical Engineering

ETHS 338: The Cameroonian Experience

We’re sorry to report this course has been canceled.

Immersion learning experience living and studying in Cameroon. The focus of the course is the culture, literature, and language of Francophone Cameroon, with some emphasis on Anglophone Cameroon. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural sites and attending arranged courses at the University of Buea. Students will prepare a research paper. Coursework is in French. To do coursework in English, students should enroll in WLIT 338 or ETHS 338. Offered as ETHS 338, FRCH 338, and WLIT 338.  Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: FRCH 202

For more information, please visit the course website

 

Dates: May 26-June 6, 2018

Session: May Term

Session: Study Abroad

Time: TBA

Instructor: Gilbert Doho

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Ethnic Studies, Study Abroad

FRCH 308/408: The Paris Experience

Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Paris. The focus of the course is the literature and culture of the African, Arab, and Asian communities of Paris. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural centers and museums and interviewing authors and students about the immigrant experience. Assigned readings complement course activities. Students enrolled in FRCH 308/408 do coursework in French. WLIT 308/408 students have the option of completing coursework in English. Graduate students have additional course requirements. Offered as FRCH 308, WLIT 308, FRCH 408, and WLIT 408. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: FRCH 202.

For more information, please visit the course website

The first 10 undergraduate students who enroll in The Paris Experience (FRCH 308) will receive a $1000 scholarship from the the Eirik Borve Fund for Foreign Language Instruction to go towards their study abroad language program. To be eligible, students must be CWRU undergraduates who have completed the initial study abroad application and submitted their deposit to the Office of Education Abroad. Only students enrolled in the language version of the course where the study abroad program is cross-listed are scholarship eligible. For additional questions, contact the Office of Education Abroad at studyabroad@case.edu.

Dates: May 13-June 2, 2018

Session: May Term

Session: Study Abroad

Time: Course meets in Paris, France

Instructor: Cheryl Toman

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, Study Abroad

FRCH 338: The Cameroonian Experience

We’re sorry to report this course has been canceled.

Immersion learning experience living and studying in Cameroon. The focus of the course is the culture, literature, and language of Francophone Cameroon, with some emphasis on Anglophone Cameroon. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural sites and attending arranged courses at the University of Buea. Students will prepare a research paper. Coursework is in French. To do coursework in English, students should enroll in WLIT 338 or ETHS 338. Offered as ETHS 338, FRCH 338, and WLIT 338.  Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: FRCH 202.

For more information, please visit the course website

The first 10 undergraduate students who enroll in The Cameroonian Experience (FRCH 338) will receive a $1000 scholarship from the the Eirik Borve Fund for Foreign Language Instruction to go towards their study abroad language program. To be eligible, students must be CWRU undergraduates who have completed the initial study abroad application and submitted their deposit to the Office of Education Abroad. Only students enrolled in the language version of the course where the study abroad program is cross-listed are scholarship eligible. For additional questions, contact the Office of Education Abroad at studyabroad@case.edu

Dates: May 26-June 6, 2018

Session: May Term

Session: Study Abroad

Time: TBA

Instructor: Gilbert Doho

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, Study Abroad

HSTY 124: Sex and the City: Gender & Urban History

Gender is an identity and an experience written onto the spaces of the city. The urban landscape – with its streets, buildings, bridges, parks and squares – shapes and reflects gender identities and sexual relations. This course examines the relationship between gender and urban space from the 19th century to the present, giving special attention to the city of Cleveland. Using Cleveland as our case study, this course will explore some of the many ways in which cities and the inhabitants of cities have been historically sexed, gendered, and sexualized. We will explore the ways in which gender was reflected and constructed by the built environment, as well as how urban space and urban life shaped gender and sexual identities. The course is organized thematically and explores different aspects of city life such as prostitution, urban crime, labor, politics, urban renewal and decay, consumption and leisure and the ways in which sex and gender intersects with these issues. In addition to reading and analyzing secondary and primary sources, we will also experience ourselves how gender is being written onto the urban landscape by walking in the city and going to its museums.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Einav Rabinovitch-Fox

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2018 Summer

ITAL 308: The Italian Experience

A three-week summer study abroad course spent at a university in an Italian city well-known for its cultural and linguistic heritage and at other important sites during travel. Focus: Language immersion and processing of cultural experience. Main features: 1. Intense collaboration with an Italian university. Students interact with Italian peers; seminars are co-taught by Italian faculty. 2. Creation of an individual journal that synthesizes students’ perception of and reflections on their experience, records the progress of their final project, and documents their improvement in language proficiency. 3. Final project. Students meet M-F in a formal setting for advanced language study designed to improve proficiency in speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. They attend seminars on varied topics in literature, history, and civilization. Visits to museums, galleries, and attendance at cultural events are included.

For more information, please visit the course website

The first 10 undergraduate students who enroll in Italian Experience (ITAL 308) will receive a $1000 scholarship from the the Eirik Borve Fund for Foreign Language Instruction to go towards their study abroad language program. To be eligible, students must be CWRU undergraduates who have completed the initial study abroad application and submitted their deposit to the Office of Education Abroad. Only students enrolled in the language version of the course where the study abroad program is cross-listed are scholarship eligible. For additional questions, contact the Office of Education Abroad at studyabroad@case.edu.

 

Dates: May 14-18 on Campus; May 22-31 in Italy

Session: May Term

Session: Study Abroad

Time: TBA

Instructor: Denise Caterinacci

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2018 Summer, Study Abroad

PHIL 201: Introduction to Logic

Presentation, application, and evaluation of formal methods for determining the validity of arguments. Discussion of the relationship between logic and other disciplines. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Christopher Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

RLGN 215: Religion in America

This course is an introduction to American religions, with a particular focus on religious diversity in the United States. As we examine the myriad beliefs and practices of America’s religious communities, we will pay close attention to how religion and culture have shaped each other from the 1600s to today.

To explore the theme of religious diversity, we will take advantage of Cleveland’s rich religious history with visits to local religious institutions and historical sites, including churches, mosques, new religious communities, and Hindu and Buddhist temples. Along the way we will consider the role of religious spaces and institutions in shaping identity and community in our region and beyond.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Brian Clites

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Religious Studies

SOCI 250: Law and Society: Law, Rights and Policy

How does the U.S. legal system “work”? How does a judge make a decision? Do rights matter? Do human rights work the same way? Class participants will examine how rights, including human rights, fit in the legal system and society. We will ask how legal actors, like judges and lawyers, think about rights compared to non-lawyers. Class participants will observe court hearings in a Federal District Court, an Ohio Appellate Court, as well as local small claims court. We will benefit from hearing experts, local, national, and international, discuss how “law” works and whether rights are useful to making change.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Brian Gran

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

THTR 206: Mr. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang: James Bond and Popular Culture

The twenty-one films of James Bond have become part of popular culture, and the figure of the superspy has become mythic in proportion. This series, from its first installment in 1963 to the latest reinvention of James Bond in 2006, not only depicts one dashing man’s efforts to save the world from disaster again and again, but also traces the development of our popular culture. Issues of violence, sex, the presentation and treatment of women, racial stereotypes, and spectacle among other topics can be discussed after viewing each film, providing an opportunity to explore the changing expectations of American audiences and the developing form of contemporary cinema. Students who have taken USSO 286D may not receive credit for this class.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MW 9:30a-1:00p; TuThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Jeffrey Ullom

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Theater

UNIV 300: Premedical Concepts and Review: MCAT Preparation

This course is designed to comprehensively review all Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) content areas, as well as testing methods, and hone the skills students need to improve performance on the MCAT. This course will be team taught to include faculty expertise in biochemistry, biology, chemistry, English, mathematics, physics, psychological sciences, and sociology. Critical analysis and reasoning skills will be emphasized. Students will gain practice working on MCAT questions that test knowledge and critical thinking. Faculty will provide directed feedback to students to assist them in their test taking strategies.  Completion of introductory courses in all subject areas above is strongly recommended before taking this review course.

The MCAT is administered by the AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges). Course materials include sample questions, two practice exams, and other materials from the AAMC.

May Term: 5/14 – 6/1, MTWRF, 9:30am – 1:00pm

View this course in the Schedule of Classes here.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-1:00p

Instructor: Rebecca Benard, Susan Burden-Gulley, Greg Tochtrop, T. Kenney Fountain, Diana Driscoll, Arin Connell, Jessica Kelly, Jill Korbin

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, Chemistry, English, New 2018 Summer, Physics, Psychological Sciences, Sociology

WLIT 308/408: The Paris Experience

Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Paris. The focus of the course is the literature and culture of the African, Arab, and Asian communities of Paris. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural centers and museums and interviewing authors and students about the immigrant experience. Assigned readings complement course activities. Students enrolled in FRCH 308/408 do coursework in French. WLIT 308/408 students have the option of completing coursework in English. Graduate students have additional course requirements. Offered as FRCH 308, WLIT 308, FRCH 408, and WLIT 408. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

For more information, please visit the course website

Dates: May 13-June 2, 2018

Session: May Term

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: Cheryl Toman

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Study Abroad, World Literature

WLIT 338: The Cameroonian Experience

We’re sorry to report this course has been canceled.

Immersion learning experience living and studying in Cameroon. The focus of the course is the culture, literature, and language of Francophone Cameroon, with some emphasis on Anglophone Cameroon. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural sites and attending arranged courses at the University of Buea. Students will prepare a research paper. Coursework is in French. To do coursework in English, students should enroll in WLIT 338 or ETHS 338. Offered as ETHS 338, FRCH 338, and WLIT 338.  Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: FRCH 202

For more information, please visit the course website

Dates: May 26-June 6, 2018

Session: May Term

Session: Study Abroad

Time: TBA

Instructor: Gilbert Doho

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Study Abroad, World Literature

Page last modified: May 13, 2018