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May Term Courses


ANTH 314/414: Cultures of the United States

This course considers the rich ethnic diversity of the U.S. from the perspective of social/cultural anthropology. Conquest, immigration, problems of conflicts and accommodation, and the character of the diverse regional and ethnic cultures are considered as are forms of racism, discrimination, and their consequences. Groups of interest include various Latina/o and Native peoples, African-American groups, and specific ethnic groups of Pacific, Mediterranean, European, Asian, and Caribbean origin. Offered as ANTH 314, ETHS 314, and ANTH 414.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWTh 9:30a-12:30p

Instructor: Atwood Gaines

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

BIOL 214: Genes, Evolution and Ecology

First in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on DNA and RNA); mitotic and meiotic cell cycles, gene expression, genetics, population genetics, evolution, biological diversity and ecology. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 111.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 214L: Genes, Evolution and Ecology Laboratory

First in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (with a focus on DNA and RNA); basics of cell structure (with a focus on malaria research); molecular genetics, biotechnology; population genetics and evolution, ecology. Assignments will be in the form of a scientific journal submission. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 214.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: TuTh 1:00-4:00p; MW 1:00-2:00p

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 215: Cells and Proteins

Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on membranes, energy conversion organelles and cytoskeleton); protein structure-function; enzyme kinetics, cellular energetics, and cell communication and motility strategies. Prereq: BIOL 214 and (CHEM 105 or CHEM 111). Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 106 or ENGR 145.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Valerie Haywood

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 215L: Cells and Proteins Laboratory

Second in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics to include: protein structure-function, enzymes kinetics; cell structure; cellular energetics, respiration and photosynthesis. In addition, membrane structure and transport will be covered. Laboratory and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. This course is not available for students who have taken BIOL 215 as a 4-credit course. Prereq: BIOL 214L and Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 215.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MW 1:00-2:00p; TTh 1:00-4:00p

Instructor: Deborah Harris

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 216: Development and Physiology

This is the final class in the series of three courses required of the Biology major. As with the two previous courses, BIOL 214 and 215, this course is designed to provide an overview of fundamental biological processes. It will examine the complexity of interactions controlling reproduction, development and physiological function in animals. The Developmental Biology section will review topics such as gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, the genetic control of development, stem cells and cloning. Main topics included in the Physiology portion consist of: homeostasis, the function of neurons and nervous systems; the major organ systems and processes involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, temperature regulation, endocrine function and the immunologic response.  Prereq: BIOL 214.

 

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:00-11:30a

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 216L: Development and Physiology Laboratory

Third in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Students will conduct laboratory experiments designed to provide hands-on, empirical laboratory experience in order to better understand the complex interactions governing the basic physiology and development of organisms. Laboratories and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. Prereq: BIOL 214L. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 216.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: TuTh 12:30-3:30p, MW 12:30-1:30p

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 346: Human Anatomy

Gross anatomy of the human body. Two lectures and one laboratory demonstration per week. Prereq: BIOL 216 or BIOL 251.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Ronald Oldfield

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2018 Summer

EBME 370: Principles of Biomedical Engineering Design

Students learn and implement the design process to produce working prototypes of medical devices with potential commercial value to meet significant clinical needs. Critical examination of contemporary medical problems is used to develop a specific problem statement. The class is divided into teams of 3 to 4 students. Each team integrates their knowledge and skills to design a device to meet their clinical need. Project planning and management, including resource allocation, milestones, and documentation, are required to ensure successful completion of projects within the allotted time and budget. Formal design reviews by a panel of advisors and outside medical device experts are required every four weeks. Every student is required to give oral presentations at each formal review and is responsible for formal documentation of the design process, resulting in an executive summary and complete design history file of the project. The course culminates with a public presentation of the team’s device to a panel of experts. This course is expected to provide the student with a real-world, capstone design experience. Recommended preparation: EBME 310

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Colin Drummond

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Biomedical Engineering

FRCH 313/413: Medical French

Medical French is an upper-level course with a focus on health care in France and other Francophone countries. Students gain knowledge of the health care structures of various Francophone countries, as well as the vocabulary used in professional medical communication. Special emphasis on Doctors without Borders (Medecins sans frontieres). There will be visits to local hospitals and health care sites. Press articles, media reports, films, videos, and short literary texts are used as resources. Offered as FRCH 313 and FRCH 413. Prereq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Marie Lathers

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy

Basic problems of philosophy and methods of philosophical thinking. Problems raised by science, morality, religion, politics, and art. Readings from classical and contemporary philosophers. Normally given in multiple sections with different instructors and possibly with different texts. All sections share core materials in theory of knowledge, metaphysics, and ethics despite differences that may exist in emphasis.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Chris Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHIL 201: Introduction to Logic

Presentation, application, and evaluation of formal methods for determining the validity of arguments. Discussion of the relationship between logic and other disciplines. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Colin McLarty

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PSCL 453: Seminars in Psychology: Child Development

A Special Problem or Topic Seminar. Content varies with student and faculty interest. This summer the Child development class will be designed to address the needs of students from Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center and MSASS who are enrolled in the Early Intervention Program. Biological, cognitive, psychosocial, and emotion foundations in infancy, childhood and adolescence will be discussed.

Dates: May 15-25, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWTh 9:00a-11:55a

Instructor: Elizabeth Short

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

RLGN 215: Religion in America

This course is an introduction to American religions, with a particular focus on religious diversity in the United States. As we examine the myriad beliefs and practices of America’s religious communities, we will pay close attention to how religion and culture have shaped each other from the 1600s to today.

To explore the theme of religious diversity, we will take advantage of Cleveland’s rich religious history with visits to local religious institutions and historical sites, including churches, mosques, new religious communities, and Hindu and Buddhist temples. Along the way we will consider the role of religious spaces and institutions in shaping identity and community in our region and beyond.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, Religious Studies

SOCI 250: Law and Society: Law, Rights and Policy

How does the U.S. legal system “work”? How does a judge make a decision? Do rights matter? Do human rights work the same way? Class participants will examine how rights, including human rights, fit in the legal system and society. We will ask how legal actors, like judges and lawyers, think about rights compared to non-lawyers. Class participants will observe court hearings in a Federal District Court, an Ohio Appellate Court, as well as local small claims court. We will benefit from hearing experts, local, national, and international, discuss how “law” works and whether rights are useful to making change.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Brian Gran

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

THTR 206: Mr. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang: James Bond and Popular Culture

The twenty-one films of James Bond have become part of popular culture, and the figure of the superspy has become mythic in proportion. This series, from its first installment in 1963 to the latest reinvention of James Bond in 2006, not only depicts one dashing man’s efforts to save the world from disaster again and again, but also traces the development of our popular culture. Issues of violence, sex, the presentation and treatment of women, racial stereotypes, and spectacle among other topics can be discussed after viewing each film, providing an opportunity to explore the changing expectations of American audiences and the developing form of contemporary cinema. Students who have taken USSO 286D may not receive credit for this class.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MW 9:30a-1:00p; TuThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Jeffrey Ullom

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Theater

Page last modified: November 21, 2016