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New 2019 Summer Courses


ANTH 215: Health, Culture, and Disease: An Introduction to Medical Anthropology

This course is an introduction to the field of Medical Anthropology. Medical Anthropology is concerned with the cross-cultural study of culture, health, and illness. During the course of the semester, our survey will include (1) theoretical orientations and key concepts; (2) the cross-cultural diversity of health beliefs and practices (abroad and at home); and (3) contemporary issues and special populations (e.g., AIDS, homelessness, refugees, women’s health, and children at risk).

Dates: June 3-June 28, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MWF 9:30-12:25

Instructor: Vanessa Hildebrand

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2019 Summer

ARTH 101: Art History I: Pyramids to Pagodas

The first half of a two-semester survey of world art highlighting the major monuments of the ancient Mediterranean, medieval Europe, MesoAmerica, Africa, and Asia. Special emphasis on visual analysis, and socio-cultural contexts, and objects in the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 10:30-12:00

Instructor: Russell Green

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, New 2019 Summer

ASTR 105: Introduction to Einstein’s Universe

This course is a descriptive introduction for the non-science major to Einstein’s Special and General Theories of Relativity and how these theories have fundamentally altered our understanding of the universe. Topics discussed will include: time dilation, length contraction, the twin paradox, the warping of space-time, white dwarf stars, neutron stars, black holes, the structure and evolution of the universe. No mathematical background beyond simple algebra is needed. This course has no pre-requisites.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 10:30 -12:00

Instructor: Jeffrey Kriessler

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Astronomy, New 2019 Summer

BIOL 336/436: Aquatic Biology

Physical, chemical, and biological dynamics of lake ecosystems. Factors governing the distribution, abundance, and diversity of freshwater organisms.
This course satisfies the Population Biology/Ecology breadth requirement of the B.A. and B.S. in Biology.
Offered as BIOL 336 and BIOL 436. Prerequisite: Undergraduate Student and BIOL 214 or Requisites Not Met permission

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 10:00-12:30

Instructor: Deborah Harris

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2019 Summer

CLSC 326/426: Rome on Site: The Archaeology of the Eternal City

How did the city of Rome grow from a village of thatch-roofed huts to the center of a multicultural empire that stretched from Scotland to Syria and from the Danube to the Sahara? Who were the ancient Romans who saw and oversaw this rapid expansion of power? And how can we trace their rise, political transformations, and later successors through the material remains of their capital city? We’ll examine these topics and more during an 18-day study tour of the major archaeological sites and museums of Rome and its neighbors, including day trips to the Etruscan tombs at Tarquinia and Cerveteri, the archaeological playground of Ostia, the hill-top city of Palestrina, and the ongoing excavations at Gabii, as well as an extended trip to the Bay of Naples to explore the spectacular remains of the cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum.

Prereq.: Instructor Approval. Fulfills Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement.

Visit the class website here.

Dates: June 9-June 27, 2019

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: Evelyn Adkins, Mark Hammond

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Classics, New 2019 Summer, Study Abroad

ECON 103 – Principles of Macroeconomics

While Microeconomics looks at individual consumers and firms, Macroeconomics looks at the economy as a whole. The focus of this class will be on the business cycle. Unemployment, inflation and national production all change with the business cycle. We will look at how these are measured, their past behavior and at theoretical models that attempt to explain this behavior. We will also look at the role of the Federal Government and the Federal Reserve Bank of the United States in managing the business cycle.

Dates: June 17-July 29, 2019

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MW 3:00-6:00

Instructor: Daniel Shoag

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Economics, New 2019 Summer

EECS 281: Logic Design and Computer Organization

Fundamentals of digital systems in terms of both computer organization and logic level design. Organization of digital computers; information representation; boolean algebra; analysis and synthesis of combinational and sequential circuits; datapaths and register transfers; instruction sets and assembly language; input/output and communication; memory.

Time: TWR 1:00-3:30

Instructor: Evren Gurkan Cavusoglu

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, New 2019 Summer

EMSE 368/468: Scientific Writing in Materials Science and Engineering

For writing a thesis (or a publication) in the field of materials science and engineering, students need a diverse set of skills in addition to mastering the scientific content. Generally, scientific writing requires proficiency in document organization, professional presentation of numerical and graphical data, literature retrieval and management, text processing, version control, graphical illustration, mathematical typesetting, the English language, elements of style, etc. Scientific writing in materials science and engineering, specifically, requires additional knowledge about e.g. conventions of numerical precision, error limits, mathematical typesetting, proper use of units, proper digital processing of micrographs, etc. Having to acquire these essential skills at the beginning of thesis (or publication) writing may compromise the outcome by distracting from the most important task of composing the best possible scientific content.
This course properly prepares students for scientific writing with a comprehensive spectrum of knowledge, skills, and tools enabling them to fully focus on the scientific content of their thesis or publication when the time has come to start writing. Similar to artistic drawing, where the ability to “see” is as (or more!) important as skills of the hand, the ability of proper scientific writing is intimately linked to the ability of critically reviewing scientific texts. Therefore, students will practice both authoring and critical reviewing of material science texts. To sharpen students’ skills of reviewing, examples of good and less good scientific writing will be taken from published literature of materials science and engineering and analyzed in the context of knowledge acquired in the course. At the end of the course, students will have set up skills and a highly functional work environment to start writing their role thesis or article with full focus on the scientific content. While the course mainly targets students of materials science and engineering, students of other disciplines of science and engineering may also benefit from the course material.
Offered as EMSE 368 and EMSE 468.

Dates: June 17-July 29, 2019

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MTWRF 2:00-3:15

Instructor: Frank Ernst

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Materials Science & Engineering, New 2019 Summer

ENGL 370/470: Comics and the Graphic Novel

Selected topics in the study and analysis of comics and the graphic novel. Topics may include historical contexts of the genre, visual rhetoric, thematic developments, influence of literature, adaptations into film. A student may not receive credit for both ENGL 370 and ENGL 370C.
Offered as ENGL 370, ENGL 370C, and ENGL 470.

Prerequisite: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, or FSCS.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MW 11:45-2:00

Instructor: Cara Byrne

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, New 2019 Summer

FRCH 328/428: Science and Technology in France

The course is an exploration of the development of science and technology in France, its rise in the 18th and 19th century, its subsequent decline until the mid-20th century, and its more recent renaissance–from both a scientific and humanities perspective. A significant component will focus on the contributions of women to science in France. Students will visit historical sites such as Marie Curie’s laboratory and the Foucault pendulum, as well as current research facilities such as the Soleil Synchrotron outside of Paris and the Large Hadron Collider in France/Switzerland. To supplement these site visits, readings will come from the fields of science and technology (e.g., popular journals such as Scientific American), history, and French literature–either in French or English translation as appropriate for the student and the enrollment choice.
Offered as: FRCH 328, FRCH 428, WGST 333, WLIT 353 and WLIT 453.

For more information, please visit the course website.

Dates: May 12,2019 - May 31, 2019

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: Cheryl Toman and Charles Rosenblatt

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2019 Summer, Study Abroad

HSTY 393: Advanced Readings in the History of Race

This course examines the concept of race as a social construction that carries political and economic implications. We begin by examining the histories of the early racial taxonomists (e.g., Bernier, Linnaeus, and Blumenbach among others) and the contexts that informed their writings. We then assess how the concept of race changed from the nineteenth to the twentieth century in the United States. We conclude by evaluating how the ideology of race has influenced U.S. domestic life and foreign policy at specific historical moments.
Offered as HSTY 393, HSTY 493, and ETHS 393.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTW 1:00-3:40

Instructor: John Flores

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2019 Summer

ITAL 101: Elementary Italian I

Introductory course; stress on mastery of the sound system and basic sentence structure of spoken and written Italian. Independent laboratory practice is a requirement.

Dates: June 3-June 28, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWR 9:30-12:30; lab TBD

Instructor: Denise Caterinacci

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2019 Summer

MATH 121: Calculus for Science and Engineering I

Functions, analytic geometry of lines and polynomials, limits, derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Definite integral, antiderivatives, fundamental theorem of calculus, change of variables. Recommended preparation: Three and one half years of high school mathematics. Credit for at most one of MATH 121, MATH 123 and MATH 125 can be applied to hours required for graduation.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 8:45-10:15

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics, New 2019 Summer

MUGN 201: Introduction to Music: Listening Experience I

A flexible approach to the study of the materials and literature of music. Aural and analytical skills primarily for classical music.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 10:30-12:00

Instructor: Eric Charnofsky

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Music, New 2019 Summer

ORBH 250 – Leading People (LEAD I)

The principal goals of this course are to help students learn about the context in which managers and leaders function, gain self-awareness of their own leadership vision and values, understand the options they have for careers in management based on their own aptitudes, orientations and expertise, and develop the fundamental skills needed for success in a chosen career. Through a series of experiential activities, assessment exercises, group discussions, and peer coaching, based on a model of self-directed learning and life-long development, the course helps students understand and formulate their own career and life vision, assess their skills and abilities, and design a development plan to reach their objectives. The course enables students to see how the effective leadership of people contributes to organizational performance and the production of value, and how for many organizations, the effective leadership of people is the driver of competitive advantage. This is the first course in a two course sequence. Credit for at most one of ORBH 250 and ORBH 396 can be applied to hours required for graduation.

Dates: June 17-July 29, 2019

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TR 1:00-4:00

Instructor: Tracey Messer

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, Organizational Behavior

PSCL 230: Child Psychology

Basic facts and principles of psychological development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: TR 9:00-12:30

Instructor: Rita Obeid

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, Psychological Sciences

PSCL 329: Adolescence

Psychological perspectives on physical, cognitive, and social development. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:00-11:20

Instructor: Betsy Short

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, Psychological Sciences

PSCL 353: Psychology of Learning

The basic methods in the study of learning. The major theories proposed to account for the learning process. Development of the fundamental concepts and principles governing the learning process in both humans and lower animal. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 17-July 29, 2019

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TWR 4:00-6:00

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, Psychological Sciences

USSO 291X: “We’re Dying in America”: The History of the U.S. AIDS Crisis

Thirty-seven years have passed since the summer of 1981, when the Centers for Disease Control published a report on the mysterious deaths of five previously-healthy gay men. In that time, more than thirty-nine million people have died of AIDS around the globe. Approximately 600,000 of those people died in the United States; at least 10,000 more Americans will die this year. Why, given the global scope of the crisis and the dramatic impact it has had on US society and culture, do so few students learn about the AIDS crisis in school? Why does it receive less attention than, for example, terrorism? In this course, we will study the first 20 years of the United States’ AIDS crisis, and use what we learn to contemplate the current status of HIV-positive people and people with AIDS. We will examine the origins of AIDS as a biological, political, and cultural phenomenon in the hopes of understanding why the United States experienced the virus as it did. We will also address the myriad responses to the virus by presidents and preachers, artists and activists, doctors and business people. How did this tragedy impact American politics and culture? What lessons did we learn, and what mistakes are we still repeating today? How can (and should) the history of AIDS inform our response to the opioid crisis, or the battle over Obamacare? Are we ready for the next epidemic?

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 12:00-1:30

Instructor: Andrea Milne

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, SAGES

USSY 286U: Puzzled

“Puzzled” will look at the practice of puzzle making and puzzle-solving and explore the meaning of puzzles for different cultures throughout history. We will read works from the disciplines of math, history, anthropology, philosophy, and literature. We will explore why certain types of puzzles became popular and how puzzles have transferred from one culture to another. We will examine the role of code writing and code-breaking in the military and in the world of business. We will read examples of fiction and watch films that adopt the form of the puzzle as a narrative device. We will think about the function of puzzles as instruments to exercise the faculties of reason and logic and as a means of leisure or pleasant distraction.

Students will be asked to both solve and create puzzles over the course of the semester. They will write analytical essays on topics related to the practice and history of puzzle making and puzzle solving, and they will pursue a research topic that revolves around an issue or problem that has “puzzled” them.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 2:30-4:00

Instructor: Bernie Jim

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, SAGES

USSY 292Q: The Secret Lives of Animals

Animals are instructive. When we study animals, their biological makeups and creaturely habits, we do so with hopes of learning something about them. At the same time, such investigations often betray an interest in our human selves. The study of animals, in scientific and literary laboratories alike, quickly turns to acts of self-discovery: not what it means to be animal, exactly, but what it means to be human-animals. So what more could we learn by cultivating new strategies for listening and new languages for communicating with animals?

This seminar invites students to investigate the secret lives of animals as imagined in a sampling of classical, medieval and modern literatures. Thinking with animals past and present–in fables, manuals, and tales–we will examine human-animal relationships in imagined settings. Over the course of the semester, we will read, view, listen, and perform works in which animals are tasked with teaching moral lessons and testing the ethical obligations of their human audiences. Comparing treatments of companion animals past and present, we will reflect on the many ways literature can guide our evolving relationship to the animal kingdom.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTR 6:30-8:00

Instructor: Arthur Russell

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, SAGES

USSY 293I: High Art and Guilty Pleasures

How, and why, do we draw distinctions between art and entertainment? Lowbrow and highbrow? A crowd-pleasing “flick” and a critic-approved “film?” This seminar will explore the logic of this common sorting process, as well as its consequences. After all, such distinctions historically have been linked with other forms of discrimination–often amplifying or silencing certain voices on the basis of gender, race, or class. In this course we’ll investigate these connections between critical evaluation and broader social dynamics, while also engaging critically with our own tastes, values, and received ideas. What makes The Great Gatsby so great? Is there any value in keeping up with the Kardashians? Who determines the criteria that make one work a “classic,” the other a “guilty pleasure?” Traversing a range of artworks, novels, comics, and movies, we’ll work both the high and the low ends of the cultural spectrum, paying special attention to works that seem to blur or combine the usual categories–compelling us to ask whether great art and guilty pleasures can sometimes be one and the same.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWR 1:00-2:30

Instructor: Steve PInkerton

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, SAGES

WGST 333: Science and Technology in France

The course is an exploration of the development of science and technology in France, its rise in the 18th and 19th century, its subsequent decline until the mid-20th century, and its more recent renaissance–from both a scientific and humanities perspective. A significant component will focus on the contributions of women to science in France. Students will visit historical sites such as Marie Curie’s laboratory and the Foucault pendulum, as well as current research facilities such as the Soleil Synchrotron outside of Paris and the Large Hadron Collider in France/Switzerland. To supplement these site visits, readings will come from the fields of science and technology (e.g., popular journals such as Scientific American), history, and French literature–either in French or English translation as appropriate for the student and the enrollment choice.
Offered as: FRCH 328, FRCH 428, WGST 333, WLIT 352 and WLIT 453.

For more information, please visit the course website.

Dates: May 12, 2019 - May 31, 2019

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: Cheryl Toman and Charles Rosenblatt

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, Study Abroad, Women's and Gender Studies

WLIT 353/453: Science and Technology in France

The course is an exploration of the development of science and technology in France, its rise in the 18th and 19th century, its subsequent decline until the mid-20th century, and its more recent renaissance–from both a scientific and humanities perspective. A significant component will focus on the contributions of women to science in France. Students will visit historical sites such as Marie Curie’s laboratory and the Foucault pendulum, as well as current research facilities such as the Soleil Synchrotron outside of Paris and the Large Hadron Collider in France/Switzerland. To supplement these site visits, readings will come from the fields of science and technology (e.g., popular journals such as Scientific American), history, and French literature–either in French or English translation as appropriate for the student and the enrollment choice.
Offered as: FRCH 328, FRCH 428, WGST 333, WLIT 352 and WLIT 453.

For more information, please visit the course website.

Dates: May 12, 2019 - May 31, 2019

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: Cheryl Toman and Charles Rosenblatt

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, Study Abroad, World Literature

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