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ACCT 100: Foundations of Accounting

Accounting is the language of business and this course exposes students to that language. This course introduces students to the basic principles, objectives, terminology and role of financial, managerial, and tax accounting in business. This course is intended for both business and non-business majors. This is the first required accounting course for all business majors. Counts as a Quantitative Reasoning course.

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MW 2:30-5:30pm

Instructor: Mark Barrus

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Accounting,

ANTH 102: Being Human: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

The nature of culture and humans as culture-bearing animals. The range of cultural phenomena including language, social organization, religion, and culture change, and the relevance of anthropology for contemporary social, economic, and ecological problems. Students will have the opportunity to appreciate the global scope of the human experience, identifying differences as well as commonalities, by exploring examples from societies and cultures from around the world. Counts as a Human Diversity & Commonality course. Counts as a Understanding Global Perspectives course.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 1, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Annika Doneghy

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ANTH 102: Being Human: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

The nature of culture and humans as culture-bearing animals. The range of cultural phenomena including language, social organization, religion, and culture change, and the relevance of anthropology for contemporary social, economic, and ecological problems. Students will have the opportunity to appreciate the global scope of the human experience, identifying differences as well as commonalities, by exploring examples from societies and cultures from around the world. Counts as a Human Diversity & Commonality course. Counts as a Understanding Global Perspectives course.

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 1-3:30pm

Instructor: Regan Gee

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ANTH 102: Being Human: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

The nature of culture and humans as culture-bearing animals. The range of cultural phenomena including language, social organization, religion, and culture change, and the relevance of anthropology for contemporary social, economic, and ecological problems. Students will have the opportunity to appreciate the global scope of the human experience, identifying differences as well as commonalities, by exploring examples from societies and cultures from around the world. Counts as a Human Diversity & Commonality course. Counts as a Understanding Global Perspectives course.

 

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTRF 10:30am-12:40pm

Instructor: Janee Kelly

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ANTH 215: Health, Culture, and Disease: An Introduction to Medical Anthropology

This course is an introduction to the field of Medical Anthropology. Medical Anthropology is concerned with the cross-cultural study of culture, health, and illness. During the course of the semester, our survey will include (1) theoretical orientations and key concepts; (2) the cross-cultural diversity of health beliefs and practices (abroad and at home); and (3) contemporary issues and special populations (e.g., AIDS, homelessness, refugees, women’s health, and children at risk). Counts as a Human Diversity & Commonality course. Counts as a Understanding Global Perspectives course.

 

 

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 1-3:30pm

Instructor: Anuoluwapo Ajibade

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ANTH 215: Health, Culture, and Disease: An Introduction to Medical Anthropology

This course is an introduction to the field of Medical Anthropology. Medical Anthropology is concerned with the cross-cultural study of culture, health, and illness. During the course of the semester, our survey will include (1) theoretical orientations and key concepts; (2) the cross-cultural diversity of health beliefs and practices (abroad and at home); and (3) contemporary issues and special populations (e.g., AIDS, homelessness, refugees, women’s health, and children at risk). Counts as a Human Diversity & Commonality course. Counts as a Understanding Global Perspectives course.

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 1:00-3:10pm

Instructor: Jillian Schulte

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ARTH 101: Art History I: Pyramids to Pagodas

An introductory course exploring the visual cultures of the ancient and medieval Mediterranean, Mesoamerica, Africa, and Asia up to 1400. Special emphasis on visual analysis, historical and sociocultural contexts, and an introduction to issues in the study of art history and the institution of the museum. The class will include frequent visits to the Cleveland Museum of Art. Counts as a CAS Global & Cultural Diversity course. Counts as a Human Diversity & Commonality course. Counts as a Understanding Global Perspectives course.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MWF 9:30-11am

Instructor: Claudia Haines

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Art History and Art

ARTH 102: Art History II: Michelangelo to Maya Lin

An introductory course exploring the visual cultures of Africa, the Americas, Asia and Europe from 1400 to the present. Special emphasis will be placed on visual analysis, historical and sociocultural contexts, and an introduction to issues in the study of art history and the institution of the museum. We will also focus on various methodological approaches to the history of art, such as gender, class, colonization & decolonization, and globalization as we trace the stories of art and its creation. We will look at a diverse range of objects and monuments, emphasizing their functions, forms, and historical and cultural contexts. Students will gain a deeper understanding not only of individual works of art but also of the cultures that produced them, and we will consider the relevance of the past to our own culture today. This class will take advantage of the rich collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art with weekly sessions in the galleries. Counts as a CAS Global & Cultural Diversity course. Counts as a Human Diversity & Commonality course. Counts as a Understanding Global Perspectives course.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MWF 10:00-11:30am

Instructor: Claire Sumner

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Art History and Art

ARTS 106: Creative Drawing I

Development of graphic fluency in black and white through direct observation of nature and the model. Drawing as a means of enlarging visual sensitivity using a wide range of media and subject matter. Work from nude model.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 1, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: TWR 9:00-11:55am

Instructor: George Kozmon

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

ARTS 214: Ceramics I

The techniques of hand building in pinch, coil and slab methods. Development of sensitivity to design and form. Basic work in stoneware, earthenware, and glazing.

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: TR 6-8:15pm

Instructor: Martha Lois

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

ARTS 216: Painting I

The creative, conceptual, visual, and technical aspects of painting. Style ranging from naturalism to abstraction. Work in acrylic and mixed media.

 

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MWR 9-11:55am

Instructor: David King

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

ASTR 103: Introduction to the Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe

This introductory astronomy course describes the universe we live in and how astronomers develop our physical understanding about it. Topics covered include: the properties of stars; the formation, evolution, and death of stars; white dwarfs, pulsars, and black holes; spiral and elliptical galaxies; the Big Bang and the expansion of the Universe. This course has no pre-requisites.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: Asynchronous

Instructor: William Janesh

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Astronomy

BAFI 355: Corporate Finance

The basic goals of this course are to familiarize students with the concepts and tools used in financial management at both the corporate and personal levels. They include the notion of present value, securities valuation, risk and return analysis, and other financial analysis techniques. The concepts and techniques are, in turn, used to evaluate and make decisions regarding the firm’s investments (capital budgeting) and the cost of capital. Prereq: ACCT 100 or ACCT 101.

Dates: June 17 - July 31, 2024

Session: 6 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TR 9am - 12pm

Instructor: Jose Olavarria

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Banking & Finance

BIOL 214: Genes, Ecology and Evolution

First in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on DNA and RNA); mitotic and meiotic cell cycles, gene expression, genetics, population genetics, evolution, biological diversity and ecology. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 111.

 

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTWRF 9:00-11:30am

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 214: Genes, Evolution and Ecology

First in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on DNA and RNA); mitotic and meiotic cell cycles, gene expression, genetics, population genetics, evolution, biological diversity and ecology. Prereq or Coreq: (Undergraduate Student and CHEM 105 or CHEM 111) or Requisites Not Met permission.

 

 

Dates: June 3 - July 1, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 215: Cells and Proteins

Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on membranes, energy conversion organelles and cytoskeleton); protein structure-function; enzyme kinetics, cellular energetics, and cell communication and motility strategies. Requirements to enroll: 1) Undergraduate degree seeking student; AND 2) Previous enrollment in BIOL 214 and (CHEM 105 or CHEM 111); AND Previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 106 or ENGR 145; OR Requisites Not Met permission.

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9-11:30am

Instructor: Valerie Haywood

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 215: Cells and Proteins

Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on membranes, energy conversion organelles and cytoskeleton); protein structure-function; enzyme kinetics, cellular energetics, and cell communication and motility strategies. Requirements to enroll: 1) Undergraduate degree seeking student; AND 2) Previous enrollment in BIOL 214 and (CHEM 105 or CHEM 111); AND Previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 106 or ENGR 145; OR Requisites Not Met permission.

 

 

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Julie Denker

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 216: Development and Physiology

This is the final class in the series of three courses required of the Biology major. As with the two previous courses, BIOL 214 and 215, this course is designed to provide an overview of fundamental biological processes. It will examine the complexity of interactions controlling reproduction, development and physiological function in animals. The Developmental Biology section will review topics such as gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, the genetic control of development, stem cells and cloning. Main topics included in the Physiology portion consist of: homeostasis, the function of neurons and nervous systems; the major organ systems and processes involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, temperature regulation, endocrine function and the immunologic response. There are two instructional modes for this course: lecture mode and hybrid mode. In the lecture mode students attend class for their instruction. In the hybrid mode students watch online lectures from the course instructor and attend one discussion section with the course instructor each week. The online content prepares students for the discussion. Which mode is offered varies depending on the term. Students are made aware of what mode is offered at the time of registration. The total student effort and course content is identical for both instructional modes. Either instructional mode fulfills the BIOL 216 requirement for the BA and BS in Biology. Prereq: (Undergraduate Student and BIOL 214) or Requisites Not Met permission.

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9-11:30am

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 216L: Development and Physiology Laboratory

Third in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Students will conduct laboratory experiments designed to provide hands-on, empirical laboratory experience in order to better understand the complex interactions governing the basic physiology and development of organisms. Laboratories and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. Prereq: (Undergraduate Student and BIOL 214L or BIOL 222L) and Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 216 or Requisites Not Met permission.

 

 

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TR 6-8pm

Instructor: Susan Burden-Gulley

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 216L: Development and Physiology Laboratory

Third in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Students will conduct laboratory experiments designed to provide hands-on, empirical laboratory experience in order to better understand the complex interactions governing the basic physiology and development of organisms. Laboratories and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. Prereq: (Undergraduate Student and BIOL 214L or BIOL 222L) and Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 216 or Requisites Not Met permission.

Dates: June 3 - July 1, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TR 1:30-3pm

Instructor: Julie Denker

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 302: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does my brain learn and how can its learning best be facilitated?” Each student is required to develop a comprehensive theory about personal learning. These theories will take the form of a major paper which will be expanded and modified throughout the semester. Readings and class discussions will focus on the following topics: learning and education systems, major structures of the brain and their role in learning, neuronal wiring of the brain and how learning changes it, the emotional brain and its essential role in learning, language and the brain, the role of images in learning, memory and learning (and related pathologies, such as PTSD). Students are expected to incorporate information on these topics into their personal theory of learning. In so doing, students are expected to articulate meaningful questions, skillfully employ research and apply their own knowledge to address such questions, produce clear, precise academic prose to explicate their ideas, and provide relevant and constructive criticism during class discussions. Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322. Counts as a SAGES Departmental Seminar course. Prereq: Undergraduate Student or Requisites Not Met Permission.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MWF 9-11:20am

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 312: Introductory Plant Biology

This course will provide an overview of plant biology. Topics covered will include: (1) Plant structure, function and development from the cellular level to the whole plant (2) plant diversity, evolution of the bacteria, fungi, algae, bryophytes and vascular plants; (3) adaptations to their environment, plant-animal interactions, and human uses of plants.

Prereq: BIOL 215

 

Dates: June 3 - July 1, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 326/426: Genetics

Transmission genetics, nature of mutation, microbial genetics, somatic cell genetics, recombinant DNA techniques and their application to genetics, human genome mapping, plant breeding, transgenic plants and animals, uniparental inheritance, evolution, and quantitative genetics. Offered as BIOL 326 and BIOL 426. Prereq: (Undergraduate student and BIOL 214) or Requisites Not Met permission

Dates: June 17 - July 31, 2024

Session: 6 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTWR 10:30am-12pm

Instructor: Nancy Dilulio

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 336: Aquatic Biology

Physical, chemical, and biological dynamics of lake ecosystems. Factors governing the distribution, abundance, and diversity of freshwater organisms. This course satisfies the Population Biology/Ecology breadth requirement of the B.A. and B.S. in Biology. Offered as BIOL 336 and BIOL 436. Prereq: Undergraduate Student and BIOL 214 or Requisites Not Met permission.

 

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 12-2:30pm

Instructor: Fritz Petersen

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 343/443: Microbiology

The physiology, genetics, biochemistry, and diversity of microorganisms. The subject will be approached both as a basic biological science that studies the molecular and biochemical processes of cells and viruses, and as an applied science that examines the involvement of microorganisms in human disease as well as in workings of ecosystems, plant symbioses, and industrial processes. The course is divided into four major areas: bacteria, viruses, medical microbiology, and environmental and applied microbiology. Offered as BIOL 343 and BIOL 443. Prereq: (Undergraduate Student and BIOL 215) or Requisites Not Met permission.

Dates: June 3 - July 1, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Priyusha Pokala

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

CHEM 105: Principles of Chemistry I

Atomic structure; thermochemistry; periodicity, bonding and molecular structure; intermolecular forces; properties of solids; liquids, gases and solutions. Recommended preparation: One year of high school chemistry.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 10:30-12:20

Instructor: Drew Meyer

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 106: Principles of Chemistry II

Thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium; acid/base chemistry; oxidation and reduction; kinetics; spectroscopy; introduction to nuclear, organic, inorganic, and polymer chemistry.

Prereq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 111.

 

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 10:30am-12:45pm

Instructor: Drew Meyer

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 113: Principles of Chemistry Laboratory

A one semester laboratory based on quantitative chemical measurements. Experiments include analysis, synthesis and characterization, thermochemistry and chemical kinetics. Computer analysis of data is a key part of all experiments. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or ENGR 145.

 

 

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTWR 1-2pm, lab MTWR 2-5pm

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 223: Introductory Organic Chemistry I

Introductory course for science majors and engineering students. Develops themes of structure and bonding along with elementary reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers as well as an introduction to spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 106 or ENGR 145.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTWR 10:30am-12:20pm

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 224: Introductory Organic Chemistry II

Continues and extends themes of structure and bonding from CHEM 223 and continues spectroscopy and more complex reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of aromatic rings, carbonyl compounds, amines, and selected special topics. Prereq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTWRF 9:30am-12:20pm

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 233: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: (CHEM 106 or ENGR 145) and CHEM 113. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTWR 1-2pm, lab MTWR 2-5pm

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 233: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: (CHEM 106 or ENGR 145) and CHEM 113. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

 

 

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 1-2pm, lab MTWR 2-5pm

Instructor: Gregory Tochtrop

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 234: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

A continuation of CHEM 233, involving multi-step organic synthesis, peptide synthesis, product purification and analysis using sophisticated analytical techniques such as chromatography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 233. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 224

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTWR 1-2pm, lab MTWR 2-5pm

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 234: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

A continuation of CHEM 233, involving multi-step organic synthesis, peptide synthesis, product purification and analysis using sophisticated analytical techniques such as chromatography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 233. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 224

 

 

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 1-2pm, lab MTWR 2-5pm

Instructor: Greg Tochtrop

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 301: Introductory Physical Chemistry I

First of a two-semester sequence covering principles and applications of physical chemistry, intended for chemistry and engineering majors and other students having primary interests in biochemical, biological or life-science areas. States and properties of matter. Thermodynamics and its application to chemical and biochemical systems. Chemical equilibrium. Electrochemistry. Recommended preparation: One year each of undergraduate physics and calculus, preferably including partial derivatives. Prereq: CHEM 106 or ENGR 145.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Clemens Burda

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 302: Introductory Physical Chemistry II

Continuation of CHEM 301. Chemical kinetics and catalysis. Introductory quantum chemistry. Spectroscopy. Statistical thermodynamics. Prereq: CHEM 301 or CHEM 335.

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Clemens Burda

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 328/428: Introductory Biochemistry I

A survey of biochemistry with a strong emphasis on the chemical logic underlying the structure, function, and evolution of biomolecules. Amino acids and protein structure, purification, and analysis. DNA, RNA, genes, and genomes. DNA replication, repair, and recombination. RNA synthesis and processing. Protein synthesis and turnover, control of gene expression. Hemoglobin. Drug development. Enzyme kinetics, catalytic and regulatory strategies. Carbohydrates. Offered as CHEM 328 and CHEM 428. Prereq: CHEM 224 or CHEM 323.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 1-2:50

Instructor: Rekha Srinivasan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHIN 350/350D: China and Green Cultural Transformation

Taught in Chinese, this course aims at enhancing the students’ proficiency in listening to, speaking, reading and writing Chinese at the intermediate and higher levels. As a content-driven course, it introduces students to the recent major green culture movements in China, focusing on the way the green cultural changes took place in relation to globalization, environment and climate protection, technology innovation, income redistribution, domestic consumption, and education, to meet the challenges of financial crisis, climate change, energy insecurity, and international competition. At the end of the semester, the students are expected to be able to understand readings and audiovisual materials, as well as communicate and present orally and in written formats green cultural issues covered in the course. Students who take CHIN350 are not allowed to earn credit for CHIN350D (Department Seminar), vice versa. Counts as a CAS Global & Cultural Diversity course. Prereq: CHIN 301.

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9:00-11:30am

Instructor: Peter Yang

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

CHIN/ASIA 308: Chinese Experience

Course Description TBA

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Study abroad course

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: Xin Zhang

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

CLSC 318/418: Archaeological and Epigraphical Field School

This interdisciplinary course takes place in situ in the Mediterranean and will be attached to an active archaeological project. Students will learn the methodological principles of archaeological and epigraphical fieldwork by participating in activities such as surveying, excavation, museum work, geophysical survey, artifact analysis, and other scientific techniques. In addition to work in the field and museum, students will receive an introduction to the history Greco-Roman culture through visits to major archaeological sites in the region. Examples of active archaeological projects may vary, depending on the year.

Dates: June 3 - July 1, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Dates: Study abroad course

Session: Study Abroad

Time: MTWRF 5am-2pm, SSu 8am-3pm

Instructor: Paul Iversen

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Classics, Study Abroad

COGS 322: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does my brain learn and how can its learning best be facilitated?” Each student is required to develop a comprehensive theory about personal learning. These theories will take the form of a major paper which will be expanded and modified throughout the semester. Readings and class discussions will focus on the following topics: learning and education systems, major structures of the brain and their role in learning, neuronal wiring of the brain and how learning changes it, the emotional brain and its essential role in learning, language and the brain, the role of images in learning, memory and learning (and related pathologies, such as PTSD). Students are expected to incorporate information on these topics into their personal theory of learning. In so doing, students are expected to articulate meaningful questions, skillfully employ research and apply their own knowledge to address such questions, produce clear, precise academic prose to explicate their ideas, and provide relevant and constructive criticism during class discussions. Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322. Counts as a SAGES Departmental Seminar course. Prereq: Undergraduate Student or Requisites Not Met Permission.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MWF 9-11:20am

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Cognitive Science

COGS 343/443: Music Cognition and Learning

Survey and critical review of the literature as it relates to music teaching and learning, and music performance. Specific topics may include basic psychoacoustical processes, auditory perception, cognitive organization of musical sound, tonal and musical memory, neuromusical research, affective and physiological responses to music, learning theory, musical aptitude, developmental processes, and motivation.

Dates: June 17 - July 31, 2024

Session: 6 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TWR 10am-12pm

Instructor: Benjamin Helton

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Cognitive Science

COSI 220: Introduction to American Sign Language I

This course offers basic vocabulary training and conversational interaction skills in American Sign Language. Syntactic and semantic aspects of American Sign Language will be addressed.

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TWR 10:30am-12pm

Instructor: Keri November

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

ENGL 180: Writing Tutorial

English 180 is a one-credit writing tutorial class designed to develop students’ expository writing skills through weekly scheduled conferences with a Writing Resource Center Instructor. Goals are to produce clear, well-organized, and mechanically-acceptable prose, and to demonstrate learned writing skills throughout the term. Course content is highly individualized based on the instructor’s initial assessment of the student’s writing, and the student’s individual concerns. All students must produce a minimum of 12 pages of finished writing, and complete other assignments as designated by the instructor.

 

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TBA

Instructor: Martha Schaffer

Credits: 1 credit

Department: English

ENGL 257A: Reading Fiction

This course introduces students to prose narrative forms in English by exploring their intersecting histories and their contemporary developments. As we read these texts in their historical and social contexts, we will pay particular attention to the ways in which prose fiction represents gender, class, sexuality, ability, nationality, race, and indigeneity. Our work will require careful reading, critical thinking, and scholarly, argument-based writing (including revision), as we appreciate the diversity of fiction’s forms and features. We will introduce and develop the key terms, concepts and practice of literary studies. The specific focus of the course may vary. Recommended preparation: Academic Inquiry Seminar or SAGES First Seminar. Counts as a Communication Intensive course.

 

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MWF 5-6:30pm

Instructor: Michelle Lyons-Mcfarland

Credits: 3 credits

Department: English

ENGL 257B: Reading Poetry

This course will help you to read and enjoy poetry by introducing you to the history of poetic forms in English. We’ll pay close attention to the enchanting details of poetic expression, as well as to the cultivation of individual styles and to the place of poetry in a world defined by global movements of many kinds. Our work will require careful reading, critical thinking, and scholarly, argument-based writing (including revision), as we appreciate the diversity of forms and features of poetry in English. We will introduce and develop the key terms, concepts and practice of literary studies by turning to poems for our test-cases; examples may include the sestina, sonnet and villanelle, ghazal, pantoum, haiku, and open forms. The specific focus of the course may vary. Recommended preparation: Academic Inquiry Seminar or SAGES First Seminar. Counts as a Communication Intensive course.

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MWF 3-4:30pm

Instructor: Ryan Pfeiffer

Credits: 3 credits

Department: English

ENGL 270: Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12pm

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: English

ENGL 398: Professional Communication for Engineers

A writing course for Engineering students only, covering academic and professional genres of written and oral communication. Taken in conjunction with Engineering 398, English 398 constitutes an approved SAGES Departmental Seminar. Counts as a SAGES Departmental Seminar course. Prereq or Coreq: ENGR 398. Prereq: 100 level first year seminar in FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, or FSCS.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TR 7-8:30pm

Instructor: Christine Olding

Credits: 2 credits

Department: English

ENGR 131: Elementary Computer Programming

Students will learn the fundamentals of computer programming and algorithmic problem solving. Concepts are illustrated using a wide range of examples from engineering, science, and other disciplines. Students learn how to create, debug, and test computer programs, and how to develop algorithmic solution to problems and write programs that implement those solutions. Matlab is the primary programming language used in this course, but other languages may be introduced or used throughout. Counts as a CAS Quantitative Reasoning course. Counts as a Quantitative Reasoning course.

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TBD

Instructor: Matt Williams

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 145: Chemistry of Materials

Application of fundamental chemistry principles to materials. Emphasis is on bonding and how this relates to the structure and properties in metals, ceramics, polymers and electronic materials. Application of chemistry principles to develop an understanding of how to synthesize materials.

Prereq: CHEM 111 or equivalent.

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TBD

Instructor: Dan Lacks

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 200: Statics and Strength of Materials

An introduction to the analysis, behavior and design of mechanical/structural systems. Course topics include: concepts of equilibrium; geometric properties and distributed forces; stress, strain and mechanical properties of materials; and, linear elastic behavior of elements.

Prereq: PHYS 121.

 

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TWR 5-7:30pm

Instructor: Elias Ali

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 210: Introduction to Circuits and Instruments

Modeling and circuit analysis of analog and digital circuits. Fundamental concepts in circuit analysis: voltage and current sources, Kirchhoff’s Laws, Thevenin, and Norton equivalent circuits, inductors capacitors, and transformers. Modeling sensors and amplifiers and measuring DC device characteristics. Characterization and measurement of time dependent waveforms. Transient behavior of circuits. Frequency dependent behavior of devices and amplifiers, frequency measurements. AC power and power measurements. Electronic devices as switches.

Prereq: MATH 122. Prereq or Coreq: PHYS 122.

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTW 2:30-4:30pm

Instructor: Chris Zorman

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 225: Thermodynamics, Fluid Dynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer

Elementary thermodynamic concepts: first and second laws, and equilibrium. Basic fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and mass transfer: microscopic and macroscopic perspectives.

Prereq: PHYS 121 or PHYS 123. Prereq or Coreq: MATH 223 or MATH 227.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TWR 1:00-3:00pm

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 398: Professional Communication for Engineers

Students will attend lectures on global, economic, environmental, and societal issues in engineering, which will be the basis for class discussions, written assignments and oral presentations in ENGL 398. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or FSCC 100 or equivalent and concurrent enrollment in ENGL 398 (ENGL 398 and ENGR 398 together form an approved SAGES departmental seminar).

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TBD

Instructor: Dan Lacks

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Engineering

FRCH 308/408: Immigration and the Paris Experience

Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Paris. The focus of the course is the culture, literature, and the arts of the African, Arab, and Asian communities of Paris. At least half of the course looks at issues surrounding immigration that affect women in particular. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural centers and museums and interviewing authors and students about the immigrant experience. Assigned readings complement course activities. Students enrolled in FRCH 308/408 do coursework in French. WLIT 308/408, ETHS 308, and WGST 308 students have the option of completing coursework in English. Graduate students have additional course requirements. Offered as FRCH 308, WLIT 308, ETHS 308, WGST 308, FRCH 408, and WLIT 408. Counts as a CAS Global & Cultural Diversity course. Prereq: FRCH 202.

Dates: June 2 - June 21

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: Charlotte Sanpere

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Ethnic Studies, Modern Languages and Literatures, Study Abroad, Women's and Gender Studies, World Literature

HSTY 113: Introduction to Modern World History

An introduction to modern world history, covering European imperialism, the industrial revolution, nationalism, political revolutions, major military conflicts, and the massive social changes that both caused and followed these. Substantial attention will be paid to class and race formation, transformations of gender roles, and the role of cultural differences in shaping modernity. Counts as a CAS Global & Cultural Diversity course. Counts as a Human Diversity & Commonality course. Counts as a Understanding Global Perspectives course.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 1, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 12-1:45pm

Instructor: Maysan Haydar

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

HSTY 241: Inventing Public Health

The core principle of this course is that public health is a concept that was formed in different ways at different times in different places. It had no existence as we know it before the nineteenth century, but course participants will learn how it grew out of an ancient tradition of the political elite’s concern that its subjects were a threat to them and the stability of the realm. Course participants will discover how, in the nineteenth century, it became a professional practice as we know it and realized advances in human health, longevity, and security perhaps greater than any made since. At the same time, the course will also cover how many of the assumptions of those that inaugurated public health were completely alien to present-day practitioners–even though in many ways it is a practice that helped inaugurate the modern world so familiar to us. Course participants will learn about the close relationship between public health agencies and agendas and various kinds of social authority: political power, moral influence, colonial power, and others. Ultimately, the aim of the course is to show participants that even though public health seems a supremely common sense practice, it had a highly contested birth and early life that was anything but natural or pre-ordained. That complicated birth continues to shape public health to this day. Counts as a CAS Global & Cultural Diversity course.

 

Dates: June 17 - July 31, 2024

Session: 6 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: John Broich

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

HSTY 270: Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12pm

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

HSTY 285: Psychedelics in History

A global exploration of psychedelic drugs, which have been revered, idealized, vilified, banned, and revived, HSTY 285 will look at their use in contexts ranging from indigenous Native American and African cultures, CIA explorations of “mind control,” 20th century psychotherapy, the 1960s counter-culture, and the current “psychedelic renaissance. How has historical context influenced the experience of these powerful substances? How have they in turn influenced historical context? We will explore ritual, medicinal, and recreational uses of psychedelics, but will also see how those categories can overlap.

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TWRF 10:30am-12:40pm

Instructor: Jonathan Sadowsky

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

JAPN 101: Elementary Japanese I

Introduction to understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Japanese. Students learn to read and write hiragana and katakana syllabaries and 50 kanji characters. Students are expected to achieve control of the sound system and basic structure of the language. Emphasizes aural comprehension and speaking.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 1, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR + F (lab) 9-11:20am

Instructor: Yukie Miura

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

JAPN 102: Elementary Japanese II

Continuation of JAPN 101. Emphasizes aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn approximately 100 new kanji characters. Recommended preparation: JAPN 101.

 

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR + F (lab) 9-11:20am

Instructor: Kosuke Ogaki

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

JAPN 235: The Japan Experience: Kyoto – Language, Culture & Exchanges

The Japan Experience: Kyoto is designed to provide students an opportunity to use Japanese language skills they have acquired in real life situations and deepen their understanding of Japanese language and culture through experiential learning. The course has three major learning components: “Japanese Language Learning through Activities and Cultural Experiences,” “Japan Exploration Project,” and “Exchanges with Local College Students” and will consist of class meetings before the trip focused on preparation followed by 15 days in Kyoto. Japanese Language Learning through Activities and Cultural Experiences: In Kyoto students will explore the local neighborhood and report their findings in class. Several cultural activities will be organized: Zen meditation, tea activity, Japanese cooking class, etc. The tea activity will include a rare opportunity for students to meet a tea ceremony master and experience the way of Japanese traditional tea. Exchanges with Local College Students: Students from CWRU will be able to take advantage of Ritsumeikan University’s “Buddies” program where Japanese student volunteers are paired with participants to improve conversational skills and become better acquainted with the campus and Kyoto. CWRU students will also visit classes at a local college in Osaka for exchanges with students there. These exchanges will allow participants to reinforce their language skills, develop better communication skills, and deepen cultural understanding in both classroom and real-life settings. Japan Exploration Project: Students will complete individual projects during the course. They will design their own projects using resources available in Kyoto before the trip and prepare for it. Project themes will be chosen by students based on their interests. At the end of course, students will give presentations in Japanese, demonstrating their language proficiency development. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: JAPN 201.

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Study abroad course

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: Yukiko Nishida

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, Study Abroad

JAPN 306: Readings in Manga

This course aims to enhance students’ reading skills in Japanese as well as in the other three main areas of language learning (speaking, listening, and writing) through the use of the extensive reading (a.k.a. Graded reading) method with manga in Japanese. In this course, the emphasis is put on acquiring the skill needed to enjoy reading content without translation. Students will review and learn Japanese structures and expressions as well as have the opportunity to explore colloquialisms, speech styles, onomatopoeia, contractions, interjections, and other elements of speech. The class also will incorporate individual reading activities such as oral reading sessions, timed reading, speed reading, and book discussion groups. We will also explore how Japanese scripts such Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji, as well as Roman alphabets, are integrated in manga. Our primary textbooks will be manga in Japanese; however, some additional readings in English will be given to students as a point of reference for the course lectures. The classes will primarily be conducted in Japanese. Counts as a CAS Global & Cultural Diversity course. Prereq: JAPN 202 with a C or higher.

 

 

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 12-2:15pm

Instructor: Yukiko Nishida Onitsuka

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

MATH 121: Calculus for Science and Engineering I

Functions, analytic geometry of lines and polynomials, limits, derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Definite integral, antiderivatives, fundamental theorem of calculus, change of variables. Recommended preparation: Three and one half years of high school mathematics. Credit for at most one of MATH 121, MATH 123 and MATH 125 can be applied to hours required for graduation. Counts as a CAS Quantitative Reasoning course. Counts as a Quantitative Reasoning course. Prereq: MATH 120 or a score of 30 on the mathematics diagnostic test or exempt from the mathematics diagnostic test.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTWR 8:45-10:15am

Instructor: Sara Stinchcomb

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 122: Calculus for Science and Engineering II

Continuation of MATH 121. Exponentials and logarithms, growth and decay, inverse trigonometric functions, related rates, basic techniques of integration, area and volume, polar coordinates, parametric equations. Taylor polynomials and Taylor’s theorem. Credit for at most one of MATH 122, MATH 124, and MATH 126 can be applied to hours required for graduation. Prereq: MATH 121, MATH 123 or MATH 126.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 8:45-10:15am

Instructor: Marco Roque-Sol

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 126: Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci II

Continuation of MATH 125 covering differential equations, multivariable calculus, discrete methods. Partial derivatives, maxima and minima for functions of two variables, linear regression. Differential equations; first and second order equations, systems, Taylor series methods; Newton’s method; difference equations. Credit for at most one of MATH 122, MATH 124, and MATH 126 can be applied to hours required for graduation. Prereq: MATH 121, MATH 123 or MATH 125.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTWR 8:45-10:15am

Instructor: Andrew Edwards

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 201: Introduction to Linear Algebra for Applications

Matrix operations, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, subspaces, bases and linear independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization of matrices, linear transformations, determinants. Less theoretical than MATH 307. Appropriate for majors in science, engineering, economics. Prereq: MATH 122, MATH 124 or MATH 126.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 10:30-11:45am

Instructor: Mykhailo Kuian

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 223: Calculus for Science and Engineering III

Introduction to vector algebra; lines and planes. Functions of several variables: partial derivatives, gradients, chain rule, directional derivative, maxima/minima. Multiple integrals, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Derivatives of vector valued functions, velocity and acceleration. Vector fields, line integrals, Green’s theorem. Credit for at most one of MATH 223 and MATH 227 can be applied to hours required for graduation. Prereq: MATH 122 or MATH 124.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTWR 9-10:15am

Instructor: Christopher Butler

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 224: Elementary Differential Equations

A first course in ordinary differential equations. First order equations and applications, linear equations with constant coefficients, linear systems, Laplace transforms, numerical methods of solution. Credit for at most one of MATH 224 and MATH 228 can be applied to hours required for graduation. Prereq: MATH 223 or MATH 227.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 10-11:15am

Instructor: Long Tran

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MUED 343/443: Music Cognition and Learning

Survey and critical review of the literature as it relates to music teaching and learning, and music performance. Specific topics may include basic psychoacoustical processes, auditory perception, cognitive organization of musical sound, tonal and musical memory, neuromusical research, affective and physiological responses to music, learning theory, musical aptitude, developmental processes, and motivation.

Dates: June 17 - July 31, 2024

Session: 6 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TWR 10am-12pm

Instructor: Benjamin Helton

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Music

OPRE 207: Statistics for Business and Management Science I

Organizing and summarizing data. Mean, variance, moments. Elementary probability, conditional probability. Commonly encountered distributions including binomial. Poisson, uniform, exponential, normal distributions. Central limit theorem. Sample quantities, empirical distributions. Reference distributions (chi-square, z-, t-, F-distributions). Point and interval estimation: hypothesis tests. Prereq: MATH 121 or MATH 125.

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MW 1- 2:20pm

Instructor: Maryam Zokaeinikoo

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Operations Research

ORBH 250: Leading People (LEAD I)

The principal goals of this course are to help students learn about the context in which managers and leaders function, gain self-awareness of their own leadership vision and values, understand the options they have for careers in management based on their own aptitudes, orientations and expertise, and develop the fundamental skills needed for success in a chosen career. Through a series of experiential activities, assessment exercises, group discussions, and peer coaching, based on a model of self-directed learning and life-long development, the course helps students understand and formulate their own career and life vision, assess their skills and abilities, and design a development plan to reach their objectives. The course enables students to see how the effective leadership of people contributes to organizational performance and the production of value, and how for many organizations, the effective leadership of people is the driver of competitive advantage. This is the first course in a two course sequence. Credit for at most one of ORBH 250 and ORBH 396 can be applied to hours required for graduation.

 

Dates: June 17 - July 31, 2024

Session: 6 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TR 1:00-4:00pm

Instructor: Gabriela Cuconato

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Organizational Behavior

ORBH 251: Leading Organizations (LEAD II)

The principal goal of this course is to help students enhance their leadership skills by understanding how organizations function through the lenses of structure, culture, and power/politics. The course enables students to discern how leaders function effectively as they integrate goals, resources and people within these constraints. Students learn about these organizational lenses while developing their own leadership and professional skills. Prereq: ORBH 250 or ORBH 396 and at least Sophomore standing.

 

Dates: June 17 - July 31, 2024

Session: 6 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MW 9am-12:00pm

Instructor: Han Liu

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Organizational Behavior

PHIL 201: Introduction to Logic

Basic problems of philosophy and methods of philosophical thinking. Problems raised by science, morality, religion, politics, and art. Readings from classical and contemporary philosophers. Normally given in multiple sections with different instructors and possibly with different texts. All sections share core materials in theory of knowledge, metaphysics, and ethics despite differences that may exist in emphasis.

 

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Chris Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHIL 201: Introduction to Logic

Basic problems of philosophy and methods of philosophical thinking. Problems raised by science, morality, religion, politics, and art. Readings from classical and contemporary philosophers. Normally given in multiple sections with different instructors and possibly with different texts. All sections share core materials in theory of knowledge, metaphysics, and ethics despite differences that may exist in emphasis.

Dates: June 3 - July 1, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Chris Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHIL 222: Science of Happiness

What actually makes us happy? Scientific research shows most of us get this badly wrong. For instance, money is far less important, and embracing negative emotions far more important, than most people realize. When philosophy first got started, it focused on the single most practically important question anyone can ask: How can I live a good life? A recent boom in scientific research is now validating insights from traditions that take this approach of philosophy as a way of life, including ancient greek, eastern & continental schools of philosophy. Open to all students (no pre-requisites), this course combines intellectual inquiry with experiential approaches, blending philosophical insight, evidence-based interventions and cutting-edge science. For instance, students will learn about approaches to emotion regulation and stress resilience all the way from the ancient Stoics to recently published work in psychological science. This course won’t make you happy. It will sometimes make you sad. It will expose you to tools that you can use to improve your physical and psychological well-being, and – most important of all – your sense of purpose in life.

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9-11:30am

Credits: tony.jack@case.edu credits

Department: Philosophy

PHIL 270: Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12pm

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHIL 315: Film and Philosophy

Examination of views of a major philosopher or philosophical school, a significant philosophical topic, or a topic that relates to philosophy and other discipline. Recommended preparation: PHIL 101. Offered as PHIL 315 and PHIL 415. Counts as a SAGES Departmental Seminar course.

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9-11:30am

Instructor: Chris Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHYS 115: Introductory Physics I

First part of a two-semester sequence directed primarily towards students working towards a B.A. in science, with an emphasis on the life sciences. Kinematics; Newton’s laws; gravitation; simple harmonic motion; mechanical waves; fluids; ideal gas law; heat and the first and second laws of thermodynamics. This course has a laboratory component. Students may earn credit for only one of the following courses: PHYS 115, PHYS 121, PHYS 123.

 

 

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous, lab M 10-10:50am

Instructor: Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 116: Introductory Physics II

Electrostatics, Coulomb’s law, Gauss’s law; capacitance and resistance; DC circuits; magnetic fields; electromagnetic induction; RC and RL circuits; light; geometrical optics; interference and diffraction; special relativity; introduction to quantum mechanics; elements of atomic, nuclear and particle physics. This course has a laboratory component. Students may earn credit for only one of the following courses: PHYS 116, PHYS 122, PHYS 124. Prereq: PHYS 115.

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous, lab M 10-10:50am

Instructor: Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 121: General Physics I – Mechanics

Particle dynamics, Newton’s laws of motion, energy and momentum conservation, rotational motion, and angular momentum conservation. This course has a laboratory component. Recommended preparation: MATH 121 or MATH 123 or MATH 125 or one year of high school calculus. Students who do not have the appropriate background should not enroll in PHYS 121 without first consulting the instructor. Students may earn credit for only one of the following courses: PHYS 115, PHYS 121, PHYS 123

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 10:30am-12:15pm

Instructor: Corbin Covault, Mhlambululi Mafu, Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 122: General Physics II – Electricity and Magnetism

Electricity and magnetism, emphasizing the basic electromagnetic laws of Gauss, Ampere, and Faraday. Maxwell’s equations and electromagnetic waves, interference, and diffraction. This course has a laboratory component. Students may earn credit for only one of the following courses: PHYS 116, PHYS 122, PHYS 124. Prereq: PHYS 121 or PHYS 123. Prereq or Coreq: MATH 122 or MATH 124 or MATH 126.

 

 

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 10:30am-12:15pm

Instructor: Harsh Mathur, Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PSCL 101: General Psychology I

Methods, research, and theories of psychology. Basic research from such areas as psychophysiology, sensation, perception, development, memory, learning, psychopathology, and social psychology.

Dates: June 3 - July 1, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 313: Psychology of Personality

The development and organization of personality; theories of personality and methods for assessing the person; problems of personal adjustment.

 

Dates: June 17 - July 31, 2024

Session: 6 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MWF 9-11am

Instructor: Jennifer Butler

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 321: Abnormal Psychology

Major syndromes of mental disorders, their principal symptoms, dynamics, etiology, and treatment. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 1, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Amy Przeworski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 343/443: Music Cognition and Learning

Survey and critical review of the literature as it relates to music teaching and learning, and music performance. Specific topics may include basic psychoacoustical processes, auditory perception, cognitive organization of musical sound, tonal and musical memory, neuromusical research, affective and physiological responses to music, learning theory, musical aptitude, developmental processes, and motivation.

Dates: June 17 - July 31, 2024

Session: 6 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TWR 10am-12pm

Instructor: Benjamin Helton

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 353: Psychology of Learning

The basic methods in the study of learning. The major theories proposed to account for the learning process. Development of the fundamental concepts and principles governing the learning process in both humans and lower animal. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

RLGN 270: Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12pm

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Religious Studies

SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology

This course examines the basic principles that underlie how sociologists look at the world: “The Sociological Imagination”. It addresses the basic questions: How is social order possible and how does change occur? The course is designed as a foundation for further study in field of sociology and related disciplines. It introduces the student to the role that culture and social institutions play in modern society and examines important concepts such as socialization, deviance, social control, patterned inequalities and social change. These concepts are discussed in the context of both contemporary and historical social theories. Additionally, the student will be introduced to the methods of inquiry used by practicing sociologists.

Dates: June 3 - July 1, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TWR 1-3:55pm

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SOCI 201: Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major. Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201. Counts as a CAS Global & Cultural Diversity course. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12pm

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SOCI 203: Human Development: Medical and Social

This course will provide students with an introduction to key concepts, principles, and debates in the field of human development. We will examine how biological and psychological development interact with — and are shaped by — social environments and forces. These can include families, schools, neighborhoods, peer groups, and workplaces, as well as broader forces such as ideology, policy, and culture. We will explore how patterns of human development that have been taken as “normal” in the modern era can differ greatly across societies and through social change.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SOCI 204: Criminology

What is crime and to what extent does crime affect you? This course will investigate the nature and extent of crime, theories on the causes of crime, types of crime and criminals, and the efforts society makes to cope with and prevent criminal behavior.

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 1-3:10pm

Instructor: Donald Hutcherson

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SOCI 250: Law and Society: Law, Rights and Policy

How do rights, including human rights, fit in the legal system and society? We will ask how legal actors, like judges and lawyers, think about rights compared to non-lawyers. We will (try to!) observe court hearings in an Ohio Appellate Court and a local small claims court. We will closely examine legal institutions, such as correctional facilities. We will benefit from hearing experts, local, national, and international, discuss how “law” works and whether rights are useful to making change. We will hear from a law school professor on how law school works and what the practice of law is like.

 

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Brian Gran

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SPAN 101: Elementary Spanish I

This course is for students who wish to establish a solid foundation in the language. Open to students who have little or no prior knowledge of Spanish. The course will introduce the learner to all regular, stem-changing and irregular verbs. In addition, the comparison of ser v estar, saber v conocer, tener with noun expressions, emotional and mental states and prepositions of location. Students will learn the mechanics of pronoun usage; reflexive, direct object, indirect object and double object pronouns. Lexical expressions, useful vocabulary, nouns, adverbs and adjectives will be acquired via themed chapters. Cultural topics are also explored, providing a glimpse into the daily life of Spanish-speaking countries. This course concludes with learning the past tense forms: preterit and imperfect. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to master basic conversation, listening, reading comprehension and writing skills related to everyday life, including appreciation and awareness of Hispanic multiculturalism.

 

Dates: July 11 - August 7, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TWR 9-11:55am

Instructor: Clara Gordon-Lipszyc

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

SPAN 201: Intermediate Spanish I

This course is an intermediate language course with a focus on advanced grammar and conversation. The student must be equipped with a fair amount of grammatical proficiency that includes knowing the simple verb tenses of the present, future, and past tenses of the indicative mood, along with the present and imperfect subjunctive. This course will introduce the learner to more advanced applications of these grammar topics. Along with other grammatical explorations, this course will help the student to critically think about real world topics such as familial, generational, and personal relationships, customs, traditions, and values, food and eating habits, leaders and politics, and contemporary society and technology. Students will develop better articulation of their opinions, perspectives and commentary in Spanish; both verbally and written. Students will acquire some knowledge and appreciation of Spanish-speaking authors and literature. This course will also explore the cultural traditions, customs and diversity shared by the people of countries in which Spanish is spoken. Students will also work on building confidence to deliver oral presentations in Spanish regarding different cultural topics. The course is taught completely in Spanish. Prereq: SPAN 102.

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 10:30 -1 p.m.

Instructor: Clara Lypszyc-Arroyo

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

SPAN 308: Advanced Spanish in Spain

Three week study-abroad intensive course that takes place in Valladolid, Spain. The course combines the unique advantages of a total immersion environment in Spanish with a classroom curriculum that includes grammar review, conversation practice, and study of relevant cultural issues. The focus of the culture curriculum is the study of Spain’s key historical moments through the city of Valladolid and nearby communities: their literature, visual arts, films, and music. The cultural component is enhanced by visits to historic and cultural sites and museums. Four different one-hour orientation meetings during Spring semester. Counts as a CAS Global & Cultural Diversity course. Prereq: SPAN 202 or equivalent.

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Study abroad course

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: Damaris Punales-Alpizar

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, Study Abroad

SPAN 315: Latin America Cultural Conflicts

Evolution of Latin American socioeconomic characteristics and artistic production up to the present. Class discussions of diverse literary works, social research essays, and testimonials focus on conflicting elements in class structures, ethnicity, and urban modernization as well as family ethos, religious trends, cultural identity, and educational problems. Offered as SPAN 315 and SPAN 415. Counts as a CAS Global & Cultural Diversity course. Prereq: SPAN 202.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTW 9-11:20am

Instructor: Jacqueline Nanfito

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

STAT 201: Basic Statistics for Social and Life Sciences

Designed for undergraduates in the social sciences and life sciences who need to use statistical techniques in their fields. Descriptive statistics, probability models, sampling distributions. Point and confidence interval estimation, hypothesis testing. Elementary regression and analysis of variance. Not for credit toward major or minor in Statistics. Counts as a CAS Quantitative Reasoning course. Counts as a Quantitative Reasoning course.

 

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTWRF 9:30-11:50am

Instructor: Paula Fitzgibbon

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

STAT 312R: Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science Using R Programming

For advanced undergraduate students in engineering, physical sciences, life sciences. Comprehensive introduction to probability models and statistical methods of analyzing data with the object of formulating statistical models and choosing appropriate methods for inference from experimental and observational data and for testing the model’s validity. Balanced approach with equal emphasis on probability, fundamental concepts of statistics, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, design of experiments, and regression modeling. Note: Credit given for only one (1) of STAT 312, 312R, 313; SYBB 312R. Prereq: MATH 122 or equivalent.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 1, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 10:30am-12:45pm

Instructor: Siddhartha Nandy

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

SYBB 312R: Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science Using R Programming

For advanced undergraduate students in engineering, physical sciences, life sciences. Comprehensive introduction to probability models and statistical methods of analyzing data with the object of formulating statistical models and choosing appropriate methods for inference from experimental and observational data and for testing the model’s validity. Balanced approach with equal emphasis on probability, fundamental concepts of statistics, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, design of experiments, and regression modeling. Note: Credit given for only one (1) of STAT 312, STAT 312R, STAT 313 or SYBB 312R. Offered as STAT 312R and SYBB 312R. Prereq: MATH 122 or equivalent.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 1, 2024

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 10:30am-12:45pm

Instructor: Siddhartha Nandy

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

THTR 207: Our Heroes, Ourselves: Superheroes and Popular Culture

Since the beginning of cinema, audiences have flocked to see larger-than-life superheroes conquer the unconquerable while also teaching us about ourselves and confirming (or challenging) our world view. Beginning with cinematic serials in the 1920s and continuing to the recent Marvel production machine, these films not only depict a hero’s efforts to save the world from disaster again and again, but also trace the development of our popular culture. Issues of violence, nationalism, the presentation and treatment of women, racial stereotypes, and spectacle among other topics can be discussed after viewing each film, providing an opportunity to explore the changing expectations of American audiences and the developing form of contemporary cinema.

 

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 10:30-11:55am

Instructor: Jeffrey Ullom

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Theater

USNA 285: The Science of Madness: An Historical Investigation of Mental Illness

Since antiquity the western world’s understanding of mental illness has continued to evolve. This course will examine the trajectory of that evolution, looking at the medical theories that have influenced assumptions about the causes and treatments of mental illness from the early modern era through the twenty-first century. Examples of questions we will investigate include: How we have defined the normal and the pathological in human mental behavior over time? How do we explain the centuries-old correlation that medicine has made between creativity and mental illness? Which past and present psychiatric treatments have been beneficial and which harmful? How did Darwin’s theory of evolution affect theories of mental illness (and how does it continue to do so with the advent of evolutionary psychology)? How have changing philosophies of science affected the research and practice of psychology? How and why do the sciences of the mind–psychiatry, psychoanalysis, clinical psychology, psychopharmacology, the cognitive neurosciences–claim so much scientific authority and exert influence over our lives today? As a frame work for this inquiry, the class will use the concept of paradigm shifts as Thomas Kuhn defines in his classic work, the Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Prereq: Passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSNA, FSCC, FSSO, FSSY or FSCS. Prereq or Coreq: FSTS 100.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TWR 4-5:30pm

Instructor: Barbara Burgess-Van Aken

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USNA 289A: Antibiotics: From Miracle Drugs to Superbugs

Since the discovery of penicillin in 1928, antibiotics have become an essential drug in the treatment and prevention of bacterial infections. They are used to cure sexually transmitted diseases, to ward off complications after surgery, and to boost the yield and safety of our food supply. This widespread use has created a significant problem: antibiotic-resistant “superbugs” are emerging at an alarming rate. It has been estimated that the useful lifetime of an antibiotic is only eight years. What can physicians, patients, policy-makers, corporations, and consumers do to address this trend? In this seminar, we will examine the science and history of antibiotics, some of the reasons for their overuse, and possible solutions to the problem of antibiotic resistance. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTWR 10:30-11:40am

Instructor: Susan Wang

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USNA 289F: Biology of Sleep and Dreams

Sleep is a fundamental to human survival, yet the physical and emotional components of sleep are only partially understood. In this seminar, students will investigate unanswered questions about the biology of sleep and dreams, including how sleep impacts and is impacted by wakefulness. We will read about and discuss the meaning of consciousness and the changes that occur in the body during wakefulness, sleep, and dreaming. And we will examine these states primarily from the biological perspective, with attention to the psychological and social influences and effects as well. In applying these perspectives, students will develop familiarity with approaches used to study sleep physiology, including the use of objective measures of altered states of consciousness, as well as narrative descriptions of individuals’ experiences when normal sleep patterns are disrupted. In addition, students will investigate their own sleep and dreams. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TWR 12-1:30pm

Instructor: Heidi Moawad

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USNA 290K: Neurobiology of Trauma

Course description TBD

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTW 12-1:30pm

Instructor: Ageh Bedell

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSO 286D: James Bond and Popular Culture

The twenty-one films of James Bond have become part of popular culture, and the figure of the superspy has become mythic in proportion. This series, from its first installment in 1963 to the latest reinvention of James Bond in 2006, not only depicts one dashing man’s efforts to save the world from disaster again and again, but also traces the development of our popular culture. Issues of violence, sex, the presentation and treatment of women, racial stereotypes, and spectacle among other topics can be discussed after viewing each film, providing an opportunity to explore the changing expectations of American audiences and the developing form of contemporary cinema.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MWF 10-11:30am

Instructor: Jeffrey Ullom

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSO 290B: Contemporary American Rhetoric

The health of a democratic society depends on an informed electorate. And yet the attack ads, unverified accusations, sound-bites, and carefully scripted and staged media events that fill television and the Internet tend to misinform, confuse, and disengage voters. How might we reverse this trend? How can we meaningfully enter into political conversations? How can we listen to others, form our own beliefs, and then communicate them respectfully and with purpose? To help answer these questions, we will return to modern democracy’s ancient roots, using the lens of classical rhetoric to explore contemporary political debate. While the word “rhetoric” is often used today to deride precisely what’s wrong with political discourse, as when a policy proposal is dismissed as mere “campaign rhetoric,” it more properly denotes the techniques of effective persuasion. By learning how rhetorical devices are used, we can empower ourselves to analyze policy debates and to make our own contributions. As part of this investigation, we will research issues, debate and develop positions, read and evaluate speeches, write about our own positions, participate in public conversations by writing letters to representatives and opinion pieces for newspapers, and prepare an oral presentation. We will also complete a research project in which we analyze the different perspectives on an issue of interest, formulate our own positions on an issue, and reflect on our internal processes as we take on a belief and act on it. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TWR 9-10:30am

Instructor: Martha Schaffer

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSO 291J: Narratives of Immigration

As one of the most pressing issues of the twenty-first century, immigration has captured the imagination of politicians and authors alike. In this class, we will explore the stories of those who have migrated to the United States. We will analyze how various writers create autobiographical and fictional narratives of migration, addressing issues such as adjusting to different cultures, learning new languages, and adapting to new environments. Through these stories and histories, we will ask broader questions about immigration, including: Is migration a basic human right? Is it ethical to define someone as being “illegal” for peacefully working and living in a different country from where they were born? What are the gender, ethnic, cultural, and racial barriers that exist when migrating between countries? What are the cost(s) of citizenship and embracing a new country as one’s home? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MWF 9-10:30am

Instructor: Cara Byrne

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSO 292E: Many Ways to Be a Woman: Intersectional Traditions of Feminism and Femininity

Historically, “feminism” as a word has challenged people’s political and personal investments in different ways as they encounter issues such as voting and jobs, marriage and divorce, racism and classism, homophobia and transphobia, healthcare and disability, personal liberties and social protections. Alongside these traditions of feminism, “femininity” has been a concept that seems simultaneously ancient while also under constant revision as women of color, post-colonialism, disability, queer, transgender and intersex thinkers introduce underrepresented perspectives. Facing these reactions and reforms, some people feel disinclined to identify with either word, adding to the list of “F-words” that can raise conflict in polite company. Yet however one feels about these F-words, feminism and femininity have regularly proven important movements in public debates around government, the work-force, education, and art. This seminar seeks to connect students with intersectional and sometimes conflicting traditions in politics and gender theory in order to broaden the horizons of who or what gets to be identified with feminism and femininity. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TWR 4-5:30pm

Instructor: Gabby Bychowski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSY 292N: Cli-Fi: Addressing Climate Change in Fact, Fiction, and Film

This seminar examines the emerging literary genre of Cli-Fi, or climate fiction, which bridges genres such as science fiction and apocalyptic literature as it depicts imagined responses to the damage wrought by global climate change. In the early 1960s, well in advance of compelling scientific evidence of anthropogenic climate change, novelists were already speculating about the effects of global warming. Focusing on fiction, films, and non-fiction writing from the past three decades, we will consider how authors envision the effects of climate change. Specifically, we will read works by historians, journalists, philosophers, scientists, and cultural critics as a foundation for our analysis of several works of fiction. Further, we will consider how visual media, like feature and documentary films, depict the impacts of climate change. Centrally, we will evaluate how climate fiction complements existing popular and academic conversations about our transforming world. Ultimately, responding to the broadening field of narratives about human-generated transformations of the world, we will address climate fiction’s potential to influence ethical paths shaped by those who seek to alter the disastrous trajectory that the genre imagines. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TRF 10:30am-12pm

Instructor: Matt Burkhart

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSY 294Z: The Musical on Film

While the musical represents a quintessentially American art form, it is film that has amplified and popularized it around the world, entertaining audiences as well as inspiring performers, writers and composers to put their own stamp on the form.

From the very beginning of “talking pictures,” the American musical has enthralled its audience and became the ultimate form to articulate what the “dream factories” represented. The film musical allowed moviegoers to step out of a world of realism as characters danced and sang their way through experiences that were too large to remain earthbound. At the same time, the musical not only provided escapist entertainment: song and dance revealed character, furthering the story and were not merely seen as an “interruption” or “divertissement”. Serious subject matters could be tackled and the popularity of musical films were central to the financial survival of Hollywood during the Great Depression.

While the popularity of the film musical has seen highs and lows, the form remains durable. It’s influence makes it an essential component in the study of film. This seminar will cover a range of film musicals from from the dawn of the sound era to the present day. We will encounter them not only as works of art or popular entertainment but as time capsules that help us to understand the issues of the time. All films will be ones that are easily accessible to the class and the expectation is that the assigned movies will be viewed outside of class time unless we are looking at specific excerpts. Discussion will be central to this class as we share our observation and critical evaluations of these films with respect to performance, art direction, music, direction and themes.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 31, 2024

Session: 8 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: TWR 1-2:30pm

Instructor: Donald Carrier

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

WGST 201: Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

Dates: May 13 - May 31, 2024

Session: May Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9:30am-12pm

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, History, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Sociology, Women's and Gender Studies

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