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May Session Courses


ANTH 102: Being Human: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

The nature of culture and humans as culture-bearing animals. The range of cultural phenomena including language, social organization, religion, and culture change, and the relevance of anthropology for contemporary social, economic, and ecological problems.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: On campus

Time: MTWThF 1:00-3:20pm

Instructor: Annika Doneghy

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ANTH 215: Health, Culture, and Disease: An Introduction to Medical Anthropology

This course is an introduction to the field of Medical Anthropology. Medical Anthropology is concerned with the cross-cultural study of culture, health, and illness. During the course of the semester, our survey will include (1) theoretical orientations and key concepts; (2) the cross-cultural diversity of health beliefs and practices (abroad and at home); and (3) contemporary issues and special populations (e.g., AIDS, homelessness, refugees, women’s health, and children at risk).

 

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: On campus

Time: MTWRF 10:30-12:50

Instructor: Allison Harper

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ANTH 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 6-8:20pm

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ANTH 335/435: Illegal Drugs and Society

This course provides perspectives on illegal drug use informed by the social, political and economic dimensions of the issues. Framed by the history, epidemiology, and medical consequences of drug use, students will confront the complex challenges posed by addiction. Anthropological research conducted in the U.S. and cross-culturally will demonstrate, elaborate and juxtapose various clinical, public health, and law enforcement policies and perspectives. Topics examined will include: why exclusively using a bio-medical model of addiction is inadequate; how effective is the war on drugs; what prevention, intervention and treatment efforts work; and various ideological/moral perspectives on illegal drug use.
Offered as ANTH 335 and ANTH 435.

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 10:30-12:50

Instructor: Lee Hoffer

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ANTH/BIOL/EEPS/HSTY/PHIL 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 6-8:20pm

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department:

ARAB 349: Arab World Experience: Jordan

Taught and led by Case faculty, The Arab World Experience is a spring semester course with a spring break study abroad component in a Middle Eastern or North African country supplemented by course meetings before and after travel. It will rotate among countries such as Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, etc. and be taught by faculty with appropriate area expertise in Arabic, Women’s and Gender Studies, and/or Ethnic Studies. The course focuses on topics such as history, politics, culture, and gender relations within the society of study. Workload and learning outcomes are commensurate with a semester-long three credit hour course. Guest lectures in the host country are an important component of the course as they bring a fresh, authentic perspective to the aforementioned topics discussed. There will be three three-hour meetings prior to travel, required reading, and one three-hour meeting after travel. In the host country, students will spend seven days (five-eight hours per day) in seminars, discussions, and site visits. Student grades are determined on the basis of participation, attendance, a daily experiential learning journal, interviews with guest speakers, and a final exam. Offered as ARAB 349ETHS 349 and WGST 349. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Study Abroad

Time: TBD

Instructor: Ramez Islambouli

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

ARTH 230 – Ancient Roman Art and Architecture

This survey course explores the history of Roman art and architecture from Rome’s founding in 753 B.C. up through the reign of Constantine (A.D. 306-337). Students learn how to analyze works of art and architecture in terms of form, function, and iconography. Particular emphasis is placed on situating objects and monuments within the changing historical, cultural, political, and religious contexts of ancient Rome, including major changes such as the shift from the Roman Republic to the Roman Empire and the advent of Christianity. Students will study a variety of media–such as statues, painting, metalwork, and domestic and public architecture–from the city of Rome itself as well as Roman provinces as far afield as Asia Minor and North Africa. The course will introduce students to famous buildings such as the Colosseum and the Pantheon but also to lesser known but equally important works. As we study major objects and monuments from ancient Rome, we will consider questions of design, patronage, artistic agency, viewer reception, and cultural identity. We will also consider Rome’s complex relationship to Greek culture and attempt to answer the question of what makes Roman art distinctively “Roman.”
Offered as ARTH 230 and CLSC 230.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 12:00-2:30

Instructor: Maggie Popkin

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Art History and Art

BIOL 214: Genes, Ecology and Evolution

First in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on DNA and RNA); mitotic and meiotic cell cycles, gene expression, genetics, population genetics, evolution, biological diversity and ecology. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 111.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 10:30-12:00

Instructor: Deborah Harris

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 214L: Genes, Ecology and Evolution Laboratory

First in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (with a focus on DNA and RNA); basics of cell structure (with a focus on malaria research); molecular genetics, biotechnology; population genetics and evolution, ecology. Assignments will be in the form of a scientific journal submission. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 214.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MT 10:30-12:45

Instructor: Deborah Harris

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 215: Cells and Proteins

Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on membranes, energy conversion organelles and cytoskeleton); protein structure-function; enzyme kinetics, cellular energetics, and cell communication and motility strategies.

Requirements to enroll: Previous enrollment in BIOL 214 and (CHEM 105 or CHEM 111); AND Previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 106 or ENGR 145

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWThF 9:00-11:30

Instructor: Valerie Haywood

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 215L: Cells and Proteins Laboratory

Second in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics to include: protein structure-function, enzymes kinetics; cell structure; cellular energetics, respiration and photosynthesis. In addition, membrane structure and transport will be covered. Laboratory and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks.

Prereq: BIOL 214L and Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 215

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: On campus

Time: MTWTh 12:30-3:30

Instructor: Valerie Haywood

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 216: Development and Physiology

This is the final class in the series of three courses required of the Biology major. As with the two previous courses, BIOL 214 and 215, this course is designed to provide an overview of fundamental biological processes. It will examine the complexity of interactions controlling reproduction, development and physiological function in animals. The Developmental Biology section will review topics such as gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, the genetic control of development, stem cells and cloning. Main topics included in the Physiology portion consist of: homeostasis, the function of neurons and nervous systems; the major organ systems and processes involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, temperature regulation, endocrine function and the immunologic response.

Prereq: BIOL 214

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 11:00-12:00

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 216: Development and Physiology

This is the final class in the series of three courses required of the Biology major. As with the two previous courses, BIOL 214 and 215, this course is designed to provide an overview of fundamental biological processes. It will examine the complexity of interactions controlling reproduction, development and physiological function in animals. The Developmental Biology section will review topics such as gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, the genetic control of development, stem cells and cloning. Main topics included in the Physiology portion consist of: homeostasis, the function of neurons and nervous systems; the major organ systems and processes involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, temperature regulation, endocrine function and the immunologic response.

Prereq: BIOL 214

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 11:00-12:00

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 216L: Development and Physiology Laboratory

Third in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Students will conduct laboratory experiments designed to provide hands-on, empirical laboratory experience in order to better understand the complex interactions governing the basic physiology and development of organisms. Laboratories and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. Prereq: BIOL 214L. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 216.

 

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTW 6:00-8:00pm

Instructor: Susan Burden-Gulley

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 6-8:20pm

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

CHIN 350/350D: China and Green Cultural Transformation

Taught in Chinese, this course aims at enhancing the students’ proficiency in listening to, speaking, reading and writing Chinese at the intermediate and higher levels. As a content-driven course, it introduces students to the recent major green culture movements in China, focusing on the way the green cultural changes took place in relation to globalization, environment and climate protection, technology innovation, income redistribution, domestic consumption, and education, to meet the challenges of financial crisis, climate change, energy insecurity, and international competition. At the end of the semester, the students are expected to be able to understand readings and audiovisual materials, as well as communicate and present orally and in written formats green cultural issues covered in the course. Students who take CHIN350 are not allowed to earn credit for CHIN350D (Department Seminar), vice versa. Prereq: CHIN 340.

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 9:00-11:20

Instructor: Peter Yang

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

EBME 370: Principles of Biomedical Engineering Design

Students learn and implement the design process to produce working prototypes of medical devices with potential commercial value to meet significant clinical needs.  Critical examination of contemporary medical problems is used to develop a specific problem statement.  The class is divided into teams of 3 to 4 students.  Each team integrates their knowledge and skills to design a device to meet their clinical need.  Project planning and management, including resource allocation, milestones, and documentation, are required to ensure successful completion of projects within the allotted time and budget.  Formal design reviews by a panel of advisors and outside medical device experts are required every four weeks.  Every student is required to give oral presentations at each formal review and is responsible for formal documentation of the design process, resulting in an executive summary and complete design history file of the project.  The course culminates with a public presentation of the team’s device to a panel of experts.  This course is expected to provide the student with a real-world, capstone design experience.team’s device to a panel of experts.  This course is expected to provide the student with a real-world, capstone design experience.  Recommended preparation: EBME 310

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: On campus

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Colin Drummond

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biomedical Engineering

EEPS 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 6-8:20pm

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

ENGL 270 – Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory.  An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion.  It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: English

ETHS 349: Arab World Experience: Jordan

Taught and led by Case faculty, The Arab World Experience is a spring semester course with a spring break study abroad component in a Middle Eastern or North African country supplemented by course meetings before and after travel. It will rotate among countries such as Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, etc. and be taught by faculty with appropriate area expertise in Arabic, Women’s and Gender Studies, and/or Ethnic Studies. The course focuses on topics such as history, politics, culture, and gender relations within the society of study. Workload and learning outcomes are commensurate with a semester-long three credit hour course. Guest lectures in the host country are an important component of the course as they bring a fresh, authentic perspective to the aforementioned topics discussed. There will be three three-hour meetings prior to travel, required reading, and one three-hour meeting after travel. In the host country, students will spend seven days (five-eight hours per day) in seminars, discussions, and site visits. Student grades are determined on the basis of participation, attendance, a daily experiential learning journal, interviews with guest speakers, and a final exam. Offered as ARAB 349ETHS 349 and WGST 349. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Study Abroad

Time: TBD

Instructor: Ramez Islambouli

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Ethnic Studies

FRCH 308/408: The Paris Experience

Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Paris. The focus of the course is the literature and culture of the African, Arab, and Asian communities of Paris. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural centers and museums and interviewing authors and students about the immigrant experience. Assigned readings complement course activities. Students enrolled in FRCH 308/408 do coursework in French. WLIT 308/408 students have the option of completing coursework in English. Graduate students have additional course requirements. Offered as FRCH 308, WLIT 308, FRCH 408, and WLIT 408. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: FRCH 202.

The first 10 undergraduate students who enroll in The Paris Experience (FRCH 308) will receive a $1000 scholarship from the the Eirik Borve Fund for Foreign Language Instruction to go towards their study abroad language program. To be eligible, students must be CWRU undergraduates who have completed the initial study abroad application and submitted their deposit to the Office of Education Abroad. Only students enrolled in the language version of the course where the study abroad program is cross-listed are scholarship eligible. For additional questions, contact the Office of Education Abroad at studyabroad@case.edu.

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Study Abroad

Time: Course meets in Paris, France

Instructor: Charlotte Sanpere

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

HSTY 124: Sex and the City: Gender & Urban History

Gender is an identity and an experience written onto the spaces of the city. The urban landscape – with its streets, buildings, bridges, parks and squares – shapes and reflects gender identities and sexual relations. This course examines the relationship between gender and urban space from the 19th century to the present, giving special attention to the city of Cleveland. Using Cleveland as our case study, this course will explore some of the many ways in which cities and the inhabitants of cities have been historically sexed, gendered, and sexualized. We will explore the ways in which gender was reflected and constructed by the built environment, as well as how urban space and urban life shaped gender and sexual identities. The course is organized thematically and explores different aspects of city life such as prostitution, urban crime, labor, politics, urban renewal and decay, consumption and leisure and the ways in which sex and gender intersects with these issues. In addition to reading and analyzing secondary and primary sources, we will also experience ourselves how gender is being written onto the urban landscape by walking in the city and going to its museums.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: On campus

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Einav Rabinovitch-Fox

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

HSTY 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 6-8:20pm

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

HSTY 270 – Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

IHSC 300: Synthesis of Premedical Concepts

This course aims to hone skills necessary to synthesize and integrate knowledge across multiple subject areas, and to assist in preparing for health professional school admission, such as the MCAT. The course is team taught to include faculty expertise in biochemistry, biology, chemistry, English, mathematics, physics, psychological sciences and sociology. Critical analysis and reasoning skills will be emphasized. Completion of introductory courses in all subject areas above is strongly recommended before taking this course. MCAT materials from the AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges) will be used to guide and enhance a student’s ability to synthesize across many fields, and increase critical reasoning and analytical competencies.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Time: TBD

Instructor: Jennifer Butler (Coordinator), Kim Emmons, Jessica Kelley, Rebecca Benard, Sue Burden-Gulley

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, English, Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics, Physics, Psychological Sciences, Sociology

ITAL 308: The Italian Experience

A three-week summer study abroad course spent at a university in an Italian city well-known for its cultural and linguistic heritage and at other important sites during travel. Focus: Language immersion and processing of cultural experience. Main features: 1. Intense collaboration with an Italian university. Students interact with Italian peers; seminars are co-taught by Italian faculty. 2. Creation of an individual journal that synthesizes students’ perception of and reflections on their experience, records the progress of their final project, and documents their improvement in language proficiency. 3. Final project. Students meet M-F in a formal setting for advanced language study designed to improve proficiency in speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. They attend seminars on varied topics in literature, history, and civilization. Visits to museums, galleries, and attendance at cultural events are included.

For more information, please visit the course website

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Study Abroad

Time: TBD

Instructor: Denise Caterinacci

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

JAPN 306: Extensive Reading through Manga

This course aims to enhance students, Reading skills in Japanese as well as skills in the rest of the four main areas of language learning (speaking, listening, and writing) through the use of the extensive reading (a.k.a. Graded reading) method with manga in Japanese.

In this course, the emphasis is put on acquiring the skill to enjoy reading content without translation. Students will review and learn Japanese structures and expressions, and have the opportunity to explore colloquialisms, speech styles, onomatopoeia, contractions, interjections, and other elements of speech. The class also will incorporate individual reading activities such as oral reading sessions, timed reading, speed reading and book discussion groups. We will also explore how Japanese scripts such Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji as well as Roman alphabets are integrated in manga. Our primary textbooks will be manga in Japanese; however, some additional readings in English will be given to students as a point of reference for the course lectures. The classes will primarily be conducted in Japanese. Prereq: JAPN 202 with a C or higher.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 1:00-2:45pm

Instructor: Yukiko Nishida

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy

Basic problems of philosophy and methods of philosophical thinking. Problems raised by science, morality, religion, politics, and art. Readings from classical and contemporary philosophers. Normally given in multiple sections with different instructors and possibly with different texts. All sections share core materials in theory of knowledge, metaphysics, and ethics despite differences that may exist in emphasis.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: On campus

Time: MTWR 10:30-1:40pm

Instructor: Nathalie Nya

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHIL 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 6-8:20pm

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHIL 270 – Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHIL 315: Topics in Philosophy: Film and Philosophy

Explanation of views of a major philosopher or philosophical school, a significant philosophical topic, or a topic that relates to philosophy and another discipline. Prerequisite: Phil 101 or consent of instructor.

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: On campus

Time: MTWTh 10:30-1pm

Instructor: Chris Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

RLGN 171: Introducing Christianity

This “topics” course offers an introduction to the academic study of Christianity. Whether approached through a particular theme or as a general historical introduction, each section of this course provides students with a general introduction to the academic study of religion and a basic religious literacy in Christianity, exploring forms of it in a diversity of cultural contexts throughout the world. Section topics might include, but are not limited to: The Black Church, The Apocalyptic Imagination, Latin American Liberation Theology. Students may repeat the course for credit once (two times total for 6 credits), provided that the two sections are different.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 10:35-12:55

Instructor: Bharat Ranganathan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Religious Studies

RLGN 270 – Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Religious Studies

SOCI 201 – Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SOCI 250: Law and Society: Law, Rights and Policy

How does the U.S. legal system “work”? How does a judge make a decision? Do rights matter? Do human rights work the same way? Class participants will examine how rights, including human rights, fit in the legal system and society. We will ask how legal actors, like judges and lawyers, think about rights compared to non-lawyers. Class participants will observe court hearings in a Federal District Court, an Ohio Appellate Court, as well as local small claims court. We will benefit from hearing experts, local, national, and international, discuss how “law” works and whether rights are useful to making change.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: On campus

Time: MTWRF 9:30-11:50

Instructor: Brian Gran

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SPAN 101: Elementary Spanish I

Introductory course. Students achieve control of the sound system and basic sentence structures of spoken and written Spanish. Students must use the course material offered by the Online Language Learning Center in addition to class meetings.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 1:00-3:20pm

Instructor: Gabriela Copertari

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

SPAN 308: Advanced Spanish in Spain

Study Abroad Program — Course description TBA

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Study Abroad

Time: MTWThF 10:00-12:20pm

Instructor: Damaris Punales-Alpizar

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

SPAN 313: Spanish for Health Professionals

Designed for students who are majoring in, or considering a major in, a health-related field. Focus on the vocabulary and expressions needed for the workplace, task-based practical skills, and grammatical structures. Prereq: SPAN 202 or equivalent.

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWThF 1:00-3:20pm

Instructor: Elena Fernandez

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

STAT 201: Basic Statistics for Social and Life Sciences

Designed for undergraduates in the social sciences and life sciences who need to use statistical techniques in their fields. Descriptive statistics, probability models, sampling distributions. Point and confidence interval estimation, hypothesis testing. Elementary regression and analysis of variance. Not for credit toward major or minor in Statistics.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: On campus

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: Hybrid, TBD

Instructor: Paula Fitzgibbon

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

THTR 207: Our Heroes, Ourselves: Superheroes and Popular Culture

Since the beginning of cinema, audiences have flocked to see larger-than-life superheroes conquer the unconquerable while also teaching us about ourselves and confirming (or challenging) our world view. Beginning with cinematic serials in the 1920s and continuing to the recent Marvel production machine, these films not only depict a hero’s efforts to save the world from disaster again and again, but also trace the development of our popular culture. Issues of violence, nationalism, the presentation and treatment of women, racial stereotypes, and spectacle among other topics can be discussed after viewing each film, providing an opportunity to explore the changing expectations of American audiences and the developing form of contemporary cinema.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 11:00-12:00

Instructor: Jeffrey Ullom

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Theater

WGST 124: Sex and the City: Gender & Urban History

Gender is an identity and an experience written onto the spaces of the city. The urban landscape – with its streets, buildings, bridges, parks and squares – shapes and reflects gender identities and sexual relations. This course examines the relationship between gender and urban space from the 19th century to the present, giving special attention to the city of Cleveland. Using Cleveland as our case study, this course will explore some of the many ways in which cities and the inhabitants of cities have been historically sexed, gendered, and sexualized. We will explore the ways in which gender was reflected and constructed by the built environment, as well as how urban space and urban life shaped gender and sexual identities. The course is organized thematically and explores different aspects of city life such as prostitution, urban crime, labor, politics, urban renewal and decay, consumption and leisure and the ways in which sex and gender intersects with these issues. In addition to reading and analyzing secondary and primary sources, we will also experience ourselves how gender is being written onto the urban landscape by walking in the city and going to its museums.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: On campus

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Einav Rabinovitch-Fox

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Women's and Gender Studies

WGST 201: Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

 

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Online

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Women's and Gender Studies

WLIT 349: Arab World Experience: Jordan

Taught and led by Case faculty, The Arab World Experience is a spring semester course with a spring break study abroad component in a Middle Eastern or North African country supplemented by course meetings before and after travel. It will rotate among countries such as Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, etc. and be taught by faculty with appropriate area expertise in Arabic, Women’s and Gender Studies, and/or Ethnic Studies. The course focuses on topics such as history, politics, culture, and gender relations within the society of study. Workload and learning outcomes are commensurate with a semester-long three credit hour course. Guest lectures in the host country are an important component of the course as they bring a fresh, authentic perspective to the aforementioned topics discussed. There will be three three-hour meetings prior to travel, required reading, and one three-hour meeting after travel. In the host country, students will spend seven days (five-eight hours per day) in seminars, discussions, and site visits. Student grades are determined on the basis of participation, attendance, a daily experiential learning journal, interviews with guest speakers, and a final exam. Offered as ARAB 349ETHS 349 and WGST 349. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement

Dates: May 9 - May 27, 2022

Session: May Session

Dates:

Session: Study Abroad

Time: TBD

Instructor: Ramez Islambouli

Credits: 3 credits

Department: World Literature

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