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4 Week Session (2) Courses


AFST 202: Race and Ethnic Minorities in The United States

This is a survey course that looks at the relations between racial and ethnic relations in the United States from an historical and contemporary perspective. This course will look at relations between: European colonists and native Americans; whites and blacks during the period of slavery, Jim Crow, the civil rights era and contemporary period; immigrants at the turn of the 20th and 21st century; Mexicans and Puerto Ricans; and the pan-ethnic groups such as Latinos, Asian Americans, and Arab Americans. We examine the origins of racial/ethnic hierarchies, the social construction of identities, and stratification of racial and ethnic groups. This course will take a macro perspective that examines larger structural forces (e.g., colonization, industrialization, and immigration) to explain inter-group relations, and a constructionist perspective to understand how power manufactures and maintains the social meaning of identities (looking at stereotypes and hegemonic discourse). Students who have received credit for SOCI 302 may not receive credit for SOCI 202.
Offered as AFST 202 and SOCI 202.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 10:00-12:15

Instructor: Donald Hutcherson

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

ANTH 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 9:00-12:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ARTS 216: Painting I

The creative, conceptual, visual, and technical aspects of painting. Style ranging from naturalism to abstraction. Work in acrylic and mixed media.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered blended (both in-person and remote). For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWR 9:00-11:55

Instructor: David King

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio, New 2021 Summer

ARTS 286: Introduction to Video Game Design

Game design creates meaningful play through interactive experiences. This introductory studio-based course explores games through the development and creation of 2D video games. The course aims to provide a critical vocabulary and historical context for analyzing games and gaming theory and focuses on the skills and techniques necessary to develop 2D video games.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTW 4:00-6:55

Instructor: Jared Bendis

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

BIOL 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 9:00-12:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 302: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does my brain learn and how can its learning best be facilitated?” Each student is required to develop a comprehensive theory about personal learning. These theories will take the form of a major paper which will be expanded and modified throughout the semester. Readings and class discussions will focus on the following topics: learning and education systems, major structures of the brain and their role in learning, neuronal wiring of the brain and how learning changes it, the emotional brain and its essential role in learning, language and the brain, the role of images in learning, memory and learning (and related pathologies, such as PTSD). Students are expected to incorporate information on these topics into their personal theory of learning. In so doing, students are expected to articulate meaningful questions, skillfully employ research and apply their own knowledge to address such questions, produce clear, precise academic prose to explicate their ideas, and provide relevant and constructive criticism during class discussions.
Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:00-3:15

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL/HSTY 277: Pandemics, Past and Present: Integrative Approaches

This course is an interdisciplinary course to further student’s understanding of pandemics, by integrating different approaches to comprehend the impacts and challenges of civilizations dealing with major outbreaks of disease. This course is taught at an intermediate level that will be accessible to students from a breadth of academic focus. There are no explicit prerequisites, but the course instructors will review past coursework to ensure readiness for the course. Pandemics have impacted humans throughout history. Two current global pandemics are circulating; caused by the recurrent yearly influenza virus, and the novel SARS CoV-2. Throughout this course, students will gain perspective on how we study and view pandemics both historically and currently. The course integrates the significance, challenges and consequences of living in times where deep biological and epidemiological understanding of viruses and technological advances have become part of the tools humans need to live with modern pandemics, and predict future outbreaks. Each week of the course is taught by a different instructor, to cover 4 themes: the historical perspective, the spread of disease in populations, the life cycle/molecular biology of the influenza virus and SARS CoV-2, and the technology of testing, therapeutics and vaccinations.
Offered as BIOL 277 and HSTY 277.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:00-3:15

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty, Dianne Kube, Jonathan Sadowsky, Sarah Markt

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, History, Interdisciplinary, New 2021 Summer

CHEM 106: Principles of Chemistry II

Thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium; acid/base chemistry; oxidation and reduction; kinetics; spectroscopy; introduction to nuclear, organic, inorganic, and polymer chemistry.

Prereq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 111.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 10:30-12:40

Instructor: Drew Meyer

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 224: Introductory Organic Chemistry II

Continues and extends themes of structure and bonding from CHEM 223 and continues spectroscopy and more complex reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of aromatic rings, carbonyl compounds, amines, and selected special topics.

Prereq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:20

Instructor: Rekha Srinivasan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 234: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

A continuation of CHEM 233, involving multi-step organic synthesis, peptide synthesis, product purification and analysis using sophisticated analytical techniques such as chromatography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Prereq: CHEM 233. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 224

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:00-2:00, lab MTWR 2:00-5:00

Instructor: Benjamin Sturtz

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

COGS 322: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does my brain learn and how can its learning best be facilitated?” Each student is required to develop a comprehensive theory about personal learning. These theories will take the form of a major paper which will be expanded and modified throughout the semester. Readings and class discussions will focus on the following topics: learning and education systems, major structures of the brain and their role in learning, neuronal wiring of the brain and how learning changes it, the emotional brain and its essential role in learning, language and the brain, the role of images in learning, memory and learning (and related pathologies, such as PTSD). Students are expected to incorporate information on these topics into their personal theory of learning. In so doing, students are expected to articulate meaningful questions, skillfully employ research and apply their own knowledge to address such questions, produce clear, precise academic prose to explicate their ideas, and provide relevant and constructive criticism during class discussions.
Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:00-3:15

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Cognitive Science

ECON 313: Experiential Entrepreneurship

Experiential entrepreneurship places students in a startup (founded by the student or someone else) for a semester, while simultaneously teaching students key concepts for startup success in a classroom setting. Each session covers tools and concepts that every entrepreneur should understand, and students should be able to apply these tools and concepts to their host companies. Prereq: ECON 102.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered online. For more information, please reach out to the instructor.

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWRF 5:30-7:15

Instructor: Scott Shane

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Economics, New 2021 Summer

EEPS 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 9:00-12:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

ENGR 200: Statics and Strength of Materials

An introduction to the analysis, behavior and design of mechanical/structural systems. Course topics include: concepts of equilibrium; geometric properties and distributed forces; stress, strain and mechanical properties of materials; and, linear elastic behavior of elements.

Prereq: PHYS 121.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor.

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTR 9:00-11:50

Instructor: Yue Li

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Engineering, Online

HSTY 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 9:00-12:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

JAPN 102: Elementary Japanese II

Continuation of JAPN 101. Emphasizes aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn approximately 100 new kanji characters. Recommended preparation: JAPN 101.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 8:30-11:45

Instructor: Margaret Fitzgerald

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

JAPN 306: Extensive Reading through Manga

This course aims to enhance students, Reading skills in Japanese as well as skills in the rest of the four main areas of language learning (speaking, listening, and writing) through the use of the extensive reading (a.k.a. Graded reading) method with manga in Japanese.

In this course, the emphasis is put on acquiring the skill to enjoy reading content without translation. Students will review and learn Japanese structures and expressions, and have the opportunity to explore colloquialisms, speech styles, onomatopoeia, contractions, interjections, and other elements of speech. The class also will incorporate individual reading activities such as oral reading sessions, timed reading, speed reading and book discussion groups. We will also explore how Japanese scripts such Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji as well as Roman alphabets are integrated in manga. Our primary textbooks will be manga in Japanese; however, some additional readings in English will be given to students as a point of reference for the course lectures. The classes will primarily be conducted in Japanese. Prereq: JAPN 202 with a C or higher.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:00-3:20

Instructor: Yukiko Nishida

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2021 Summer

PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy

Basic problems of philosophy and methods of philosophical thinking. Problems raised by science, morality, religion, politics, and art. Readings from classical and contemporary philosophers. Normally given in multiple sections with different instructors and possibly with different texts. All sections share core materials in theory of knowledge, metaphysics, and ethics despite differences that may exist in emphasis.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:30-3:45

Instructor: Christopher Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHIL 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 9:00-12:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHYS 116: Introductory Physics II

Electrostatics, Coulomb’s law, Gauss’s law; capacitance and resistance; DC circuits; magnetic fields; electromagnetic induction; RC and RL circuits; light; geometrical optics; interference and diffraction; special relativity; introduction to quantum mechanics; elements of atomic, nuclear and particle physics. This course has a laboratory component. Students may earn credit for only one of the following courses: PHYS 116, PHYS 122, PHYS 124.

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-asynchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Instructor: Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 122: General Physics II – Electricity and Magnetism

Electricity and magnetism, emphasizing the basic electromagnetic laws of Gauss, Ampere, and Faraday. Maxwell’s equations and electromagnetic waves, interference, and diffraction. This course has a laboratory component. Students may earn credit for only one of the following courses: PHYS 116, PHYS 122, PHYS 124.

This course is co-taught by Harsh Mathur and Corbin Covault.  The laboratory is taught by Diana Driscoll.

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWRF 9:30-11:20; lab TBD

Instructor: Corbin Covault, Harsh Mathur, Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

RLGN 101: Religion and Culture

This course introduces students to the study of religion by examining religious practices within a variety of cultural and historical contexts around the world. The course invites students to think comparatively and critically about the role of religion within broader cultural discourses (e.g., gender, politics, and the environment).

Instead of surveying what were formerly called the “world’s great religions,” this course builds religious literacy by examining religious practices within particular geographical and thematic areas. Through comparative case studies drawn from a diverse range of “non-western” cultures, students will learn about religions and spiritualities across the globe. These cultural touchstones will build core literacy in other cultures, positioning students to engage more fully in the religious and cultural diversity that they will encounter in their own lives and careers.

Alongside these geographic case studies, the course will also examine key themes in the study of religion, such as diasporic transnationalism, liberation theology, and ritual practice. We will use these themes to tease out and debate some of the core theoretical and methodological challenges in the study of religion, including postcolonial critiques of the origin and history of the field of religious studies itself.

To be clear, religion is our subject, not our approach. Although students will find opportunities to reflect on their own spirituality/disbelief, the course does not presume any particular religious or non-religious perspective. Indeed, the study of religion is itself concerned not only with the world’s religious traditions, but also with contemporary questions of skepticism, science, disbelief, and secularity.
Evaluation will be based on class preparation and participation, regular short papers, a midterm exam, and a final take-home essay exam.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 9:30-12:25

Instructor: Brian Clites

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, Religious Studies

RUSN 102: Elementary Russian II

Continuation of RUSN 101, emphasizing audiolingual practice. Recommended preparation: RUSN 101.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWRF 10:30-12:15

Instructor: Tatiana Zilotina

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2021 Summer

SOCI 202: Race and Ethnic Minorities in The United States

This is a survey course that looks at the relations between racial and ethnic relations in the United States from an historical and contemporary perspective. This course will look at relations between: European colonists and native Americans; whites and blacks during the period of slavery, Jim Crow, the civil rights era and contemporary period; immigrants at the turn of the 20th and 21st century; Mexicans and Puerto Ricans; and the pan-ethnic groups such as Latinos, Asian Americans, and Arab Americans. We examine the origins of racial/ethnic hierarchies, the social construction of identities, and stratification of racial and ethnic groups. This course will take a macro perspective that examines larger structural forces (e.g., colonization, industrialization, and immigration) to explain inter-group relations, and a constructionist perspective to understand how power manufactures and maintains the social meaning of identities (looking at stereotypes and hegemonic discourse). Students who have received credit for SOCI 302 may not receive credit for SOCI 202.
Offered as AFST 202 and SOCI 202.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 10:00-12:15

Instructor: Donald Hutcherson

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, Sociology

SPAN 102: Elementary Spanish II

Continuation of SPAN 101, emphasizing conversational skills. Recommended preparation: SPAN 101.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 12:00-2:55

Instructor: Elena Fernandez

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2021 Summer

STAT 312: Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science

For advanced undergraduate students in engineering, physical sciences, life sciences. Comprehensive introduction to probability models and statistical methods of analyzing data with the object of formulating statistical models and choosing appropriate methods for inference from experimental and observational data and for testing the model’s validity. Balanced approach with equal emphasis on probability, fundamental concepts of statistics, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, design of experiments, and regression modeling. Note: Credit given for only one (1) of STAT 312, 312R, 313; SYBB 312R. Prereq: MATH 122 or equivalent.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 2:30-4:45

Instructor: Anirban Mondal

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

STAT 312R: Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science Using R Programming

For advanced undergraduate students in engineering, physical sciences, life sciences. Comprehensive introduction to probability models and statistical methods of analyzing data with the object of formulating statistical models and choosing appropriate methods for inference from experimental and observational data and for testing the model’s validity. Balanced approach with equal emphasis on probability, fundamental concepts of statistics, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, design of experiments, and regression modeling. Note: Credit given for only one (1) of STAT 312, STAT 312R, STAT 313 or SYBB 312R.
Offered as STAT 312R and SYBB 312R. Prereq: MATH 122 or equivalent.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 2:30-4:45

Instructor: Anirban Mondal

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

SYBB 312R: Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science Using R Programming

For advanced undergraduate students in engineering, physical sciences, life sciences. Comprehensive introduction to probability models and statistical methods of analyzing data with the object of formulating statistical models and choosing appropriate methods for inference from experimental and observational data and for testing the model’s validity. Balanced approach with equal emphasis on probability, fundamental concepts of statistics, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, design of experiments, and regression modeling. Note: Credit given for only one (1) of STAT 312, STAT 312R, STAT 313 or SYBB 312R.
Offered as STAT 312R and SYBB 312R. Prereq: MATH 122 or equivalent.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 2:30-4:45

Instructor: Anirban Mondal

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

THTR 100: Introduction to Acting

A course designed to provide the non-major or undeclared liberal arts major experience with a basic understanding of acting and performance. Fundamentals in improvisation, vocabulary, and scene study are stressed. This course fulfills THTR 101 or THTR 102 should the undeclared student select theater as his or her major or minor. Students may receive credit for only one of THTR 100, THTR 101, or THTR 102.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTW 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Christopher Bohan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Theater

THTR 110: Introduction to Theater

THTR 110 is a fundamental study of theatre from the standpoint of developing the critical acumen of a potential audience. It covers each ingredient of the theatrical experience–audience, playwriting, acting, directing, theatre architecture, design and technology–and attempts to help students define a reasonable set of standards to judge that part of the experience as an audience member and to clearly communicate their feelings and thoughts regarding that experience. The primary textbook is Edward Wilson’s The Theatre Experience, former theatre critic for The Wall Street Journal. Readings in this text are augmented by the reading of specific plays that represent different periods, genres, conventions, and dramatic styles. Representative plays (typically six each semester) include Oedipus Rex (Sophocles), Hamlet (Shakespeare), Tartuffe (Molliere), Uncle Vanya (Chekhov), Waiting for Godot (Beckett), and Angels in America (Kushner). Many of these plays are supplemented by short films prepared by Films for the Humanities so that students can see examples of various dramatic and theatrical styles in performance. In addition to class discussions, lectures, and readings, students are also required to attend two live theatre productions offered by Case Western Reserve University’s Department of Theater each semester. The students write critical essays about their experience as an audience member in relation to a particular aspect of the performance. Students also have an opportunity to complete in-class projects in which they gain experience functioning as a theatre practitioner. These projects and the accompanying written assignment are designed to increase the student’s understanding of the function and interdependence of various theatre artists.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWRF 11:00-12:00

Instructor: Jeffrey Ullom

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, Online, Theater

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