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4 Week Session (2) Courses


ANTH 215: Health, Culture, and Disease: An Introduction to Medical Anthropology

This course is an introduction to the field of Medical Anthropology. Medical Anthropology is concerned with the cross-cultural study of culture, health, and illness. During the course of the semester, our survey will include (1) theoretical orientations and key concepts; (2) the cross-cultural diversity of health beliefs and practices (abroad and at home); and (3) contemporary issues and special populations (e.g., AIDS, homelessness, refugees, women’s health, and children at risk).

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 1:30-4:25

Instructor: Todd Fennimore

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ANTH 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2020 Summer

BIOL 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2020 Summer

BIOL 302: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does the human brain learn?” Through assigned readings, extensive class discussions, and a major paper, each student will explore personal perspectives on learning. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: the brain’s cycle of learning; neocortex structure and function; emotion and limbic brain; synapse dynamics and changes in learning; images in cognition; symbolic brain (language, mathematics, music); memory formation; and creative thought and brain mechanisms. The major paper will be added to each student’s SAGES writing portfolio. In addition, near the end of the semester, each student will make an oral presentation on a chosen topic. Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:00-3:15

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 326/426: Genetics

Transmission genetics, nature of mutation, microbial genetics, somatic cell genetics, recombinant DNA techniques and their application to genetics, human genome mapping, plant breeding, transgenic plants and animals, uniparental inheritance, evolution, and quantitative genetics.
Offered as BIOL 326 and BIOL 426.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Instructor: Polly Mason

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2020 Summer

CHEM 106: Principles of Chemistry II

Thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium; acid/base chemistry; oxidation and reduction; kinetics; spectroscopy; introduction to nuclear, organic, inorganic, and polymer chemistry. Prereq: CHEM 105 or equivalent.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 10:30-12:40

Instructor: Drew Meyer

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 224: Introductory Organic Chemistry II

Continues and extends themes of structure and bonding from CHEM 223 and continues spectroscopy and more complex reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of aromatic rings, carbonyl compounds, amines, and selected special topics. Prereq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:20

Instructor: Jeremy Hess

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 234: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

A continuation of CHEM 233, involving multi-step organic synthesis, peptide synthesis, product purification and analysis using sophisticated analytical techniques such as chromatography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 233. Coreq: CHEM 224

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:00-2:00, lab MTWR 2:00-5:00

Instructor: Gregory Tochtrop

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 398: Undergraduate Research/Senior Capstone Project: Capstone research in Functional Food Chemistry and Health

Independent research project within a research group in the chemistry department or, by petition, within a research group in another Case department. Arrangements should be made by consultation with the faculty member selected and the Senior Capstone Committee of the chemistry department. Open to all chemistry majors and other qualified students. Satisfies the research requirement for Honors in Chemistry. A written report and public oral presentations are required.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 10:30-12:30

Instructor: Rekha Srinivasan

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Chemistry, New 2020 Summer

COGS 322: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does the human brain learn?” Through assigned readings, extensive class discussions, and a major paper, each student will explore personal perspectives on learning. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: the brain’s cycle of learning; neocortex structure and function; emotion and limbic brain; synapse dynamics and changes in learning; images in cognition; symbolic brain (language, mathematics, music); memory formation; and creative thought and brain mechanisms. The major paper will be added to each student’s SAGES writing portfolio. In addition, near the end of the semester, each student will make an oral presentation on a chosen topic.
Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:00-3:15

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

EEPS 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, New 2020 Summer

ENGR 200: Statics and Strength of Materials

An introduction to the analysis, behavior and design of mechanical/structural systems.  Course topics include: concepts of equilibrium; geometric properties and distributed forces; stress, strain and mechanical properties of materials; and, linear elastic behavior of elements.  Prereq: PHYS 121.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

 

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: TWR 9:30-12:20

Instructor: Yue Li

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Engineering, Online

HSTY 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2020 Summer

ITAL 102: Elementary Italian II

Continuation of ITAL 101; independent laboratory practice is required in addition to scheduled class meetings.

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 9:00-11:55

Instructor: Denise Caterinacci

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2020 Summer

JAPN 102: Elementary Japanese II

Continuation of JAPN 101. Emphasizes aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn approximately 100 new kanji characters. Recommended preparation: JAPN 101.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 8:30-11:30

Instructor: Margaret Fitzgerald

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2020 Summer

PHIL 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, Philosophy

PHIL 310: Philosophy of Medicine

The current pandemic has brought into public view a broad range of philosophical questions raised connected with the practice of medicine. In this course, we will grapple with metaphysical, epistemological, ethical, social, and political questions that confront health workers, researchers, and policy makers in their efforts to maintain and improve human health on an individual and group level. Metaphysical: Are viruses alive? Can groups be infected? To what extent are groups of humans ‘superorganisms’ like ant colonies? What is a disease? Epistemological: How do we manage risk under uncertainty? At what point does research on COVID-19 become knowledge? Who decides? At what point do preventative measures need to be taken? When the disease is identified, or only until it is nearby? How do we determine a reasonable trade-off between (a) deepening our knowledge of a virus, and (b) developing a safe and effective treatment for it? Ethical/Sociopolitical: How do we weigh the costs to individual freedoms against the benefits to society when we take top-down measures to slow the spread of the disease? How ought we to weigh our social need to slow the spread of the disease against the social costs of shutting down large sectors of the economy?

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:30-3:45

Instructor: Christopher Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, Philosophy

PHIL 410: Philosophy of Medicine

The current pandemic has brought into public view a broad range of philosophical questions connected with the practice of medicine. In this course, we will grapple with metaphysical, epistemological, ethical, social, and political questions that confront health workers, researchers, and policy makers in their efforts to maintain and improve human health on an individual and group level. Metaphysical: Are viruses alive? Can groups be infected? To what extent are groups of humans ‘superorganisms’ like ant colonies? What is a disease? Epistemological: How do we manage risk under uncertainty? At what point does research on COVID-19 become knowledge? Who decides? At what point do preventative measures need to be taken? When the disease is identified, or only until it is nearby? How do we determine a reasonable trade-off between (a) deepening our knowledge of a virus, and (b) developing a safe and effective treatment for it? Ethical/Sociopolitical: How do we weigh the costs to individual freedoms against the benefits to society when we take top-down measures to slow the spread of the disease? How ought we to weigh our social need to slow the spread of the disease against the social costs of shutting down large sectors of the economy?
Offered as PHIL 310 and PHIL 410.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:30-3:45

Instructor: Christopher Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, Philosophy

PHYS 116: Introductory Physics II

Electrostatics, Coulomb’s law, Gauss’s law; capacitance and resistance; DC circuits; magnetic fields; electromagnetic induction; RC and RL circuits; light; geometrical optics; interference and diffraction; special relativity; introduction to quantum mechanics; elements of atomic, nuclear and particle physics. This course has a laboratory component. Prereq: PHYS 115.

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWRF 9:30-11:20; lab TBD

Instructor: Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 122: General Physics II – Electricity and Magnetism

Electricity and magnetism, emphasizing the basic electromagnetic laws of Gauss, Ampere, and Faraday. Maxwell’s equations and electromagnetic waves, interference, and diffraction. This course has a laboratory component. Prereq: PHYS 121 or PHYS 123. Prereq or Coreq: MATH 122 or MATH 124 or MATH 126.

This course is co-taught by Harsh Mathur and Corbin Covault.  The laboratory is taught by Diana Driscoll.

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWRF 9:30-11:20; lab TBD

Instructor: Corbin Covault, Harsh Mathur, Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

RLGN 215: Religion in America

This course is an introduction to American religions, with a particular focus on religious diversity in the United States. As we examine the myriad beliefs and practices of America’s religious communities, we will pay close attention to how religion and culture have shaped each other from the 1600s to today.

To explore the theme of religious diversity, we will take advantage of Cleveland’s rich religious history with visits to local religious institutions and historical sites, including churches, mosques, new religious communities, and Hindu and Buddhist temples. Along the way we will consider the role of religious spaces and institutions in shaping identity and community in our region and beyond.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 9:00-11:55

Instructor: Brian Clites

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Religious Studies

SOCI 208: Dating, Marriage and Family

What is the family today? How has it changed over the last century? How will it change in the future? This course aims to answer these questions as it explores the influences of work, education, government, health and religion on today’s changing families. The course considers the factors that affect mate selection. It also examines parenting, roles of husbands and wives, and family dysfunction, and divorce.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

 

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 10:00-12:15

Instructor: Samuel Belkin

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

THTR 100: Introduction to Acting

A course designed to provide the non-major or undeclared liberal arts major experience with a basic understanding of acting and performance. Fundamentals in improvisation, vocabulary, and scene study are stressed. This course fulfills THTR 101 or THTR 102 should the undeclared student select theater as his or her major or minor. Students may receive credit for only one of THTR 100, THTR 101, or THTR 102.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTW 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Christopher Bohan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Theater

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