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4 Week Session (1) Courses


ANTH 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TWR 5:00-8:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ANTH 328: Medical Anthropology and Public Health

Anthropology has a longstanding relationship with the field of public health, which dates back to before the flourishing of medical anthropology as a subfield. Direct participation of medical anthropologists in public health research and practice continues to grow. This course explores the intersection of medical anthropology and public health from the perspective of anthropological history, theory, and methods. Course topics include: the history of anthropological work in public health, medical anthropology theory as a guide to anthropological public health research, and anthropological methods and approaches to public health work. Case studies from around the world will be employed throughout the course.
Offered as ANTH 328 and ANTH 428.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWR 1:00-3:15

Instructor: Maureen Floriano

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2021 Summer

ANTH 335: Illegal Drugs and Society

This course provides perspectives on illegal drug use informed by the social, political and economic dimensions of the issues. Framed by the history, epidemiology, and medical consequences of drug use, students will confront the complex challenges posed by addiction. Anthropological research conducted in the U.S. and cross-culturally will demonstrate, elaborate and juxtapose various clinical, public health, and law enforcement policies and perspectives. Topics examined will include: why exclusively using a bio-medical model of addiction is inadequate; how effective is the war on drugs; what prevention, intervention and treatment efforts work; and various ideological/moral perspectives on illegal drug use.
Offered as ANTH 335 and ANTH 435.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWR 9:00-11:15

Instructor: Maureen Floriano

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ARAB 101: Beginning Arabic I

The course introduces learners of Arabic to the sound and writing systems of this language and provides them with basic structural and lexical knowledge to enable them to say things in Arabic, such as greeting others, thanking someone, introducing oneself, describing one’s background, seeking and providing info and so forth. The ability to perform these language functions in real-life or lifelike situations is developed by engaging the learner in structured functional activities and grammatical exercises.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWF 10:30-12:30

Instructor: Ramez Islambouli

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

ARTS 106: Creative Drawing I

Development of graphic fluency in black and white through direct observation of nature and the model. Drawing as a means of enlarging visual sensitivity using a wide range of media and subject matter. Work from nude model.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered in-person. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TWR 9:00-11:55

Instructor: George Kozmon

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio, New 2021 Summer

ARTS 220: Photography Studio I

Camera, film, and darkroom techniques. Development of basic black and white perceptual and photographic skills. Darkroom and photographic field and lab work. 35mm camera required.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TWR 1:00-3:55

Instructor: Jerry Birchfield

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

ARTS 399: Independent Study in Art Studio

Independent Study in Art Studio; by permit of Director only.

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TBA

Instructor: Jerry Birchfield

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

BIOL 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TWR 5:00-8:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

EEPS 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TWR 5:00-8:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

FRCH 101: Elementary French I

Emphasizes conversational skills. Students are expected to achieve control of sound system and basic sentence structures of French. Students must complete assignments at the Online Language Learning Center in addition to attending scheduled class meetings.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWRF 11:00-12:45

Instructor: Charlotte Sanpere

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

HSTY 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TWR 5:00-8:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

JAPN 101: Elementary Japanese I

Introduction to understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Japanese. Students learn to read and write hiragana and katakana syllabaries and 50 kanji characters. Students are expected to achieve control of the sound system and basic structure of the language. Emphasizes aural comprehension and speaking.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWR 8:30-11:30

Instructor: Yukiko Nishida

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

PHIL 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TWR 5:00-8:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHYS/PHIL 261: Our Knowledge of Climate Change: What do we know and how do we know it?

Traditional theories of knowledge have concentrated on the actions and beliefs of individuals, and how they marshal evidence from the world to support or refute their scientific hypotheses. This traditional epistemological framework has been challenged by the developments of the modern era of Big Science, resulting in the development of new approaches to a social epistemology of science. Reflective of how science is done, this epistemological framework in turn can provide guidance for the robust prosecution of the scientific enterprise. Perhaps nowhere is this more important than in climate science, where on the one hand the underlying dynamics of climate change pose an existential threat to our civilization, and on the other, there are active and well organized efforts to derail the scientific process and to denigrate the scientists.

This course will first develop classical notions of the epistemology of science, including the role of models and issues of uncertainty (statistical, systematic, and gross) as well as the challenges of developing a robust scientific process resistant to fraud. These issues will be illustrated by consideration of various classical experiments. The course will then expand the epistemological framework to the collaborative context of modern big science, illustrating the issues by examples from the field of high energy physics (which saw the development of the World Wide Web by CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, to allow physicists from around the world to share and collectively analyze data). With this in hand the course will explore the history and current state of climate science in the framework of a social epistemology of big science. Students will develop a good understanding of the role of hierarchical models of climate science, the empirical basis for our current understanding of anthropogenic climate change, the role and development of international coordination of climate science and its implications for policy, and the challenges posed by hostile, well-organized efforts to disrupt the scientific process, the public understanding of the science, and ultimately the processes necessary for addressing the challenges of climate change.

Offered as PHIL 261 and PHYS 261.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWR 1:30-3:45

Instructor: Cyrus Taylor & Chris Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Interdisciplinary, New 2021 Summer, Philosophy, Physics

PSCL 321: Abnormal Psychology

Major syndromes of mental disorders, their principal symptoms, dynamics, etiology, and treatment. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-asynchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Instructor: Amy Przeworski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

RLGN 171: Introducing Christianity

This “topics” course offers an introduction to the academic study of Christianity. Whether approached through a particular theme or as a general historical introduction, each section of this course provides students with a general introduction to the academic study of religion and a basic religious literacy in Christianity, exploring forms of it in a diversity of cultural contexts throughout the world. Section topics might include, but are not limited to: The Black Church, The Apocalyptic Imagination, Latin American Liberation Theology. Students may repeat the course for credit once (two times total for 6 credits), provided that the two sections are different.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWR 10:35-12:20

Instructor: Bharat Ranganathan

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Online, Religious Studies

RUSN 101: Elementary Russian I

Introductory course emphasizing conversational skills. Students achieve control of alphabet, sound system, and basic sentence structures in spoken and written Russian. Students must use the course material offered by the Online Language Learning Center in addition to class meetings.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWRF 10:30-12:15

Instructor: Tatiana Zilotina

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2021 Summer

SOCI 113: Critical Problems in Modern Society

Focus is on major social problems present in large, complex, industrial societies. Topics include environmental problems, poverty, drug addiction, social deviance, and alienation.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TWR 1:00-4:00

Instructor: Jessica Kelley

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SPAN 101: Elementary Spanish I

Introductory course. Students achieve control of the sound system and basic sentence structures of spoken and written Spanish. Students must use the course material offered by the Online Language Learning Center in addition to class meetings.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MWF 12:00-2:55

Instructor: Elena Fernandez

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2021 Summer

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