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6 Week Session Courses


ANTH 102: Being Human: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

The nature of culture and humans as culture-bearing animals. The range of cultural phenomena including language, social organization, religion, and culture change, and the relevance of anthropology for contemporary social, economic, and ecological problems.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 14 - July 26, 2021

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MTR 2:30-4:30

Instructor: Yi Li

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ARTS 399: Independent Study in Art Studio

Independent Study in Art Studio; by permit of Director only.

Dates: June 14 - July 26, 2021

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TBA

Instructor: Steven Ciampaglia

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

BIOL 312: Introductory Plant Biology

This course will provide an overview of plant biology. Topics covered will include: (1) Plant structure, function and development from the cellular level to the whole plant (2) plant diversity, evolution of the bacteria, fungi, algae, bryophytes and vascular plants; (3) adaptations to their environment, plant-animal interactions, and human uses of plants.

Prereq: BIOL 215

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 14 - July 26, 2021

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MW 9:00-10:00 discussion; lecture TBA

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

CLSC 202: Classical Mythology

The myths of Classical Greece and Rome, their interpretation and influence.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 14 - July 26, 2021

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MWF 3:00-5:00

Instructor: Paul Hay

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Classics

EMSE 368/468: Scientific Writing in Materials Science and Engineering

For writing a thesis (or a publication) in the field of materials science and engineering, students need a diverse set of skills in addition to mastering the scientific content. Generally, scientific writing requires proficiency in document organization, professional presentation of numerical and graphical data, literature retrieval and management, text processing, version control, graphical illustration, mathematical typesetting, the English language, elements of style, etc. Scientific writing in materials science and engineering, specifically, requires additional knowledge about e.g. conventions of numerical precision, error limits, mathematical typesetting, proper use of units, proper digital processing of micrographs, etc. Having to acquire these essential skills at the beginning of thesis (or publication) writing may compromise the outcome by distracting from the most important task of composing the best possible scientific content.

This course properly prepares students for scientific writing with a comprehensive spectrum of knowledge, skills, and tools enabling them to fully focus on the scientific content of their thesis or publication when the time has come to start writing. Similar to artistic drawing, where the ability to “see” is as (or more!) important as skills of the hand, the ability of proper scientific writing is intimately linked to the ability of critically reviewing scientific texts. Therefore, students will practice both authoring and critical reviewing of material science texts. To sharpen students’ skills of reviewing, examples of good and less good scientific writing will be taken from published literature of materials science and engineering and analyzed in the context of knowledge acquired in the course. At the end of the course, students will have set up skills and a highly functional work environment to start writing their role thesis or article with full focus on the scientific content. While the course mainly targets students of materials science and engineering, students of other disciplines of science and engineering may also benefit from the course material.

Offered as EMSE 368 and EMSE 468.

 

Dates: June 14 - July 26, 2021

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MTWRF 3:00-4:15

Instructor: Frank Ernst

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Materials Science & Engineering

EMSE 515: Analytical Methods in Materials Science

Microcharacterization techniques of materials science and engineering: SPM (scanning probe microscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscopy), FIB (focused ion beam) techniques, SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry), EPMA (electron probe microanalysis), XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectrometry), and AES (Auger electron spectrometry), ESCA (electron spectrometry for chemical analysis). The course includes theory, application examples, and laboratory demonstrations.

 

Dates: June 14 - July 26, 2021

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MTWRF 1:00-2:15

Instructor: Frank Ernst

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Materials Science & Engineering

HSTY 241: Inventing Public Health

The core principle of this course is that public health is a concept that was formed in different ways at different times in different places. It had no existence as we know it before the nineteenth century, but course participants will learn how it grew out of an ancient tradition of the political elite’s concern that its subjects were a threat to them and the stability of the realm. Course participants will discover how, in the nineteenth century, it became a professional practice as we know it and realized advances in human health, longevity, and security perhaps greater than any made since. At the same time, the course will also cover how many of the assumptions of those that inaugurated public health were completely alien to present-day practitioners–even though in many ways it is a practice that helped inaugurate the modern world so familiar to us. Course participants will learn about the close relationship between public health agencies and agendas and various kinds of social authority: political power, moral influence, colonial power, and others. Ultimately, the aim of the course is to show participants that even though public health seems a supremely common sense practice, it had a highly contested birth and early life that was anything but natural or pre-ordained. That complicated birth continues to shape public health to this day.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-asynchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 14 - July 26, 2021

Session: 6 Week Session

Instructor: John Broich

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

HSTY/ENGL 145: Utopia, Dystopia, and Scientific Modernity Sixteenth-Century to the Present

A utopia is a dream of a better world; a dystopia is a nightmare of a worse one. Both are fantasies. Yet both respond to the very real technological, political and cultural conditions in which they are written. This multidisciplinary course uses utopian and dystopian literature from the sixteenth century to the present to investigate the rise of scientific modernity and the responses it provoked. Starting with Thomas More’s Utopia, and ending with Octavia Butler’s The Parable of the Sower and a contemporary film, students will read important utopian and dystopian works of fiction and connect them to themes that run through the history of science: the relationship between knowledge and power; the impact of new technologies; voyages of exploration and exploitation; industrialization and forms of production; ideas of gender, race, and class; nuclear power; genetics; and climate change. We encourage students to ask what led to these specific critiques or ideas, and why? What limits or determines the boundaries of the possible or the desirable to each author? And how might these still be relevant today?
Offered as ENGL 145 and HSTY 145.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 14 - July 26, 2021

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MWR 10:30-12:30

Instructor: Aviva Rothman & Magdalena Vinter

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, History, Interdisciplinary, New 2021 Summer

MUGN 201: Introduction to Music: Listening Experience I

A flexible approach to the study of the materials and literature of music. Aural and analytical skills primarily for classical music.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 14 - July 26, 2021

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MTRF 11:00-12:30

Instructor: Eric Charnofsky

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Music

ORBH 250: Leading People (LEAD I)

The principal goals of this course are to help students learn about the context in which managers and leaders function, gain self-awareness of their own leadership vision and values, understand the options they have for careers in management based on their own aptitudes, orientations and expertise, and develop the fundamental skills needed for success in a chosen career. Through a series of experiential activities, assessment exercises, group discussions, and peer coaching, based on a model of self-directed learning and life-long development, the course helps students understand and formulate their own career and life vision, assess their skills and abilities, and design a development plan to reach their objectives. The course enables students to see how the effective leadership of people contributes to organizational performance and the production of value, and how for many organizations, the effective leadership of people is the driver of competitive advantage. This is the first course in a two course sequence. Credit for at most one of ORBH 250 and ORBH 396 can be applied to hours required for graduation.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered online. For more information, please reach out to the instructor.

Dates: June 14 - July 26, 2021

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TR 1:00-4:00

Instructor: Tracey Messer

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Organizational Behavior

ORBH 251: Leading Organizations (LEAD II)

The principal goal of this course is to help students enhance their leadership skills by understanding how organizations function through the lenses of structure, culture, and power/politics. The course enables students to discern how leaders function effectively as they integrate goals, resources and people within these constraints. Students learn about these organizational lenses while developing their own leadership and professional skills. Prereq: ORBH 250 or ORBH 396 and at least Sophomore standing.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered online. For more information, please reach out to the instructor.

Dates: June 14 - July 26, 2021

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MW 1:00-4:00

Instructor: Karlygash Assylkhan

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, Organizational Behavior

PSCL 101: General Psychology I

Methods, research, and theories of psychology. Basic research from such areas as psychophysiology, sensation, perception, development, memory, learning, psychopathology, and social psychology.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-asynchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 14 - July 26, 2021

Session: 6 Week Session

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 353: Psychology of Learning

The basic methods in the study of learning. The major theories proposed to account for the learning process. Development of the fundamental concepts and principles governing the learning process in both humans and lower animal. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-asynchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 14 - July 26, 2021

Session: 6 Week Session

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

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