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5 Week Session Courses


ARTS 322: Digital Photography I

Introduction of color and digital photography. A systematic approach to the digital photography workflow and its application to creative photography. History of the medium. Field and computer lab work. Advanced amateur digital camera required.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 10:00-1:00

Instructor: Barney Taxel

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio, New 2020 Summer

BIOL 214: Genes, Ecology and Evolution

First in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on DNA and RNA); mitotic and meiotic cell cycles, gene expression, genetics, population genetics, evolution, biological diversity and ecology. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 111.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: W 8:00-9:00; TBD

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 214L: Genes, Ecology and Evolution Laboratory

First in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (with a focus on DNA and RNA); basics of cell structure (with a focus on malaria research); molecular genetics, biotechnology; population genetics and evolution, ecology. Assignments will be in the form of a scientific journal submission. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 214.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MW 9:00-10:30; lab TBD

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 215: Cells and Proteins

Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on membranes, energy conversion organelles and cytoskeleton); protein structure-function; enzyme kinetics, cellular energetics, and cell communication and motility strategies. Prereq: BIOL 214 and (CHEM 105 or CHEM 111). Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 106 or ENGR 145.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Instructor: Dianne Kube

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 215L: Cells and Proteins Laboratory

Second in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics to include: protein structure-function, enzymes kinetics; cell structure; cellular energetics, respiration and photosynthesis. In addition, membrane structure and transport will be covered. Laboratory and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. This course is not available for students who have taken BIOL 215 as a 4-credit course. Prereq: BIOL 214L and Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 215.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: TR 9:00-10:30; lab TBD

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 216: Development and Physiology – Hybrid

This is the final class in the series of three courses required of the Biology major. As with the two previous courses, BIOL 214 and 215, this course is designed to provide an overview of fundamental biological processes. It will examine the complexity of interactions controlling reproduction, development and physiological function in animals. The Developmental Biology section will review topics such as gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, the genetic control of development, stem cells and cloning. Main topics included in the Physiology portion consist of: homeostasis, the function of neurons and nervous systems; the major organ systems and processes involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, temperature regulation, endocrine function and the immunologic response. There are two instructional modes for this course: lecture mode and hybrid mode. In the lecture mode students attend class for their instruction. In the hybrid mode students watch online lectures from the course instructor and attend discussion sections with the course instructor. The online content prepares students for the discussions.  The total student effort and course content is identical for both instructional modes. Either instructional mode fulfills the BIOL 216 requirement for the BA and BS in Biology. Prereq: BIOL 214.

*This section of BIOL 216 will be taught in the hybrid format. Due to the accelerated nature of the 5-week summer term, students will attend a virtual class session on Zoom every day (MTWR) from 12:00-1:15 p.m. (eastern daylight time).

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 12:00-1:15

Instructor: Rebecca Benard

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 216L: Development and Physiology Laboratory

Third in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Students will conduct laboratory experiments designed to provide hands-on, empirical laboratory experience in order to better understand the complex interactions governing the basic physiology and development of organisms. Laboratories and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. Prereq: BIOL 214L. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 216.

Please note that this lab will only run the last three weeks of the 5-week session. The dates it will run are June 15 – July 2. 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 15-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MW 1:30-2:30; Lab TBD

Instructor: Susan Burden-Gulley

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 302: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does the human brain learn?” Through assigned readings, extensive class discussions, and a major paper, each student will explore personal perspectives on learning. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: the brain’s cycle of learning; neocortex structure and function; emotion and limbic brain; synapse dynamics and changes in learning; images in cognition; symbolic brain (language, mathematics, music); memory formation; and creative thought and brain mechanisms. The major paper will be added to each student’s SAGES writing portfolio. In addition, near the end of the semester, each student will make an oral presentation on a chosen topic. Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 12:00-2:30

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 343/443: Microbiology

The physiology, genetics, biochemistry, and diversity of microorganisms. The subject will be approached both as a basic biological science that studies the molecular and biochemical processes of cells and viruses, and as an applied science that examines the involvement of microorganisms in human disease as well as in workings of ecosystems, plant symbioses, and industrial processes. The course is divided into four major areas: bacteria, viruses, medical microbiology, and environmental and applied microbiology. Offered as BIOL 343 and BIOL 443. Prereq: BIOL 215 or BIOL 250.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Instructor: Dianne Kube

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

CHEM 105: Principles of Chemistry I

Atomic structure; thermochemistry; periodicity, bonding and molecular structure; intermolecular forces; properties of solids; liquids, gases and solutions. Recommended preparation: One year of high school chemistry.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:30-12:20

Instructor: Drew Meyer

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 113: Principles of Chemistry Laboratory

A one semester laboratory based on quantitative chemical measurements. Experiments include analysis, synthesis and characterization, thermochemistry and chemical kinetics. Computer analysis of data is a key part of all experiments. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or ENGR 145. A one semester laboratory based on quantitative chemical measurements. Experiments include analysis, synthesis and characterization, thermochemistry and chemical kinetics. Computer analysis of data is a key part of all experiments. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or ENGR 145.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 1:00-2:00, lab MTWR 2:00-5:00

Instructor: Benjamin Sturtz

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 223: Introductory Organic Chemistry I

Introductory course for science majors and engineering students. Develops themes of structure and bonding along with elementary reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers as well as an introduction to spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWRF 10:30-12:20

Instructor: Jeremy Hess

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 233: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 and CHEM 113 or equivalent. Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323. An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 and CHEM 113 or equivalent. Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 1:00-2:00, lab MTWR 2:00-5:00

Instructor: Gregory Tochtrop

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 328/428: Introductory Biochemistry I

A survey of biochemistry with a strong emphasis on the chemical logic underlying metabolic pathways and the evolution of biomolecules. Cellular architecture. Amino acids and protein structure, purification, analysis, and synthesis. DNA, RNA, the flow of genetic information, and molecular biological technology. Enzyme kinetics, catalytic, and regulatory strategies. Sugars, complex carbohydrates, and glycoproteins. Lipids and cell membranes. Glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, carbon fixation through the “dark reactions” of photosynthesis, aerobic catabolism through the citric acid cycle, and glycogen metabolism. Biosynthesis and degradation of fatty acids, amino acids, and proteins. Offered as CHEM 328 and CHEM 428. Prereq: CHEM 224 or CHEM 324.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:30-12:20

Instructor: Rekha Srinivasan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

COGS 322: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does the human brain learn?” Through assigned readings, extensive class discussions, and a major paper, each student will explore personal perspectives on learning. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: the brain’s cycle of learning; neocortex structure and function; emotion and limbic brain; synapse dynamics and changes in learning; images in cognition; symbolic brain (language, mathematics, music); memory formation; and creative thought and brain mechanisms. The major paper will be added to each student’s SAGES writing portfolio. In addition, near the end of the semester, each student will make an oral presentation on a chosen topic.
Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 12:00-2:30

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Cognitive Science

EEPS 115: Introduction to Oceanography

The sciences of oceanography. Physical, chemical, biologic, and geologic features and processes of the oceans. Differences and similarities between the oceans and large lakes including the Great Lakes. Required: Sunday field trip.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Instructor: Sharmila Giri

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, New 2020 Summer

HSTY 124: Sex and the City: Gender & Urban History

Gender is an identity and an experience written onto the spaces of the city. The urban landscape – with its streets, buildings, bridges, parks and squares – shapes and reflects gender identities and sexual relations. This course examines the relationship between gender and urban space from the 19th century to the present, giving special attention to the city of Cleveland. Using Cleveland as our case study, this course will explore some of the many ways in which cities and the inhabitants of cities have been historically sexed, gendered, and sexualized. We will explore the ways in which gender was reflected and constructed by the built environment, as well as how urban space and urban life shaped gender and sexual identities. The course is organized thematically and explores different aspects of city life such as prostitution, urban crime, labor, politics, urban renewal and decay, consumption and leisure and the ways in which sex and gender intersects with these issues. In addition to reading and analyzing secondary and primary sources, we will also experience ourselves how gender is being written onto the urban landscape by walking in the city and going to its museums.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 1:00-3:30

Instructor: Einav Rabinovitch-Fox

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

HSTY 299: Topics in History: The Kent State Shootings and the “Global Sixties”

On May 4, 1970, the National Guard killed four Kent State University students who were protesting America’s involvement in Vietnam. The events that unfolded on Kent State’s campus were far from unique in the “long sixties.” In the 1960s and early 1970s, students and young people around the world mobilized and protested the war in Vietnam, racial injustice, and colonialism. Like the students at Kent State University, some died in their efforts to realize a more just and peaceful world. This course will examine the Kent State shooting through a national and global lens. We will critically examine the roots and expansion of student movements in the 1960s; how global events and transnational connections influenced the ways student activists understood political power and movement goals; and how governments and state actors responded to students and young people’s demands for social change. May 4, 2020 will mark the fiftieth anniversary of the Kent State shooting. This course will equip students to analyze how state institutions and the public choose to remember such events. In this way, the course will shed light on the politics of memory as they relate to the Kent State shooting and related events in the “global sixties.”

 

This course has been canceled for Summer 2020. 

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 2:30-5:00

Instructor: David Busch

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2020 Summer

HSTY 396/496: Advanced Topics in History: History of Epidemics

Advanced topics in history, changing from semester to semester. The course provides students an opportunity to explore special themes or theoretical issues in history that are too briefly covered in broader surveys. Students may take this course more than once for credit, when different topics are covered.

This course will look at the history of epidemics and pandemics, focusing on select cases. Topics will include social origins of epidemics, the evolution of scientific responses, stigma and blame, the comparative study of political responses, and long-term social and cultural effects of outbreaks. In most weeks, there will be a choice of readings.

Offered as HSTY 396 and HSTY 496.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 10:30-1:00

Instructor: Jonathan Sadowsky

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2020 Summer

MGMT 205: Essentials of Personal Finance

This course will provide students of all disciplines with an essential foundation in personal finance. The course will focus on four core areas of personal finance: 1) Budgeting & saving, 2) Investing, 3) Obtaining credit & controlling debt, and 4) Minimizing financial risk through the use of insurance. The course will also cover the essentials of personal taxation, retirement planning, and estate planning. This course will enable students to gain the fundamental knowledge and skills needed to make wise financial decisions as they move forward in life, which in turn will impact their ability to function as productive leaders in the workplace and financially literate citizens. A student may not receive credit for both MGMT 205 and MGMT 395 with the topic “Achieving Personal Financial Security.”

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 12:00-1:00

Instructor: Karen W. Braun

Credits: 1 credit

Departments: Accounting, , Management, New 2020 Summer

PHYS 115: Introductory Physics I

First part of a two-semester sequence directed primarily towards students working towards a B.A. in science, with an emphasis on the life sciences. Kinematics; Newton’s laws; gravitation; simple harmonic motion; mechanical waves; fluids; ideal gas law; heat and the first and second laws of thermodynamics. This course has a laboratory component.

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 9:30-11:20; lab TBD

Instructor: Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 121: General Physics I – Mechanics

Particle dynamics, Newton’s laws of motion, energy and momentum conservation, rotational motion, and angular momentum conservation. This course has a laboratory component. Recommended preparation: MATH 121 or MATH 123 or MATH 125 or one year of high school calculus.

This course is co-taught by Harsh Mathur and Corbin Covault.  The laboratory is taught by Diana Driscoll.

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 9:30-11:20; lab TBD

Instructor: Corbin Covault, Harsh Mathur, Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

RLGN 171: Introducing Christianity

This “topics” course offers an introduction to the academic study of Christianity. Whether approached through a particular theme or as a general historical introduction, each section of this course provides students with a general introduction to the academic study of religion and a basic religious literacy in Christianity, exploring forms of it in a diversity of cultural contexts throughout the world. Section topics might include, but are not limited to: The Black Church, The Apocalyptic Imagination, Latin American Liberation Theology. Students may repeat the course for credit once (two times total for 6 credits), provided that the two sections are different.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:35-12:20

Instructor: Bharat Ranganathan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Religious Studies

STAT 312: Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science

For advanced undergraduate students in engineering, physical sciences, life sciences. Comprehensive introduction to probability models and statistical methods of analyzing data with the object of formulating statistical models and choosing appropriate methods for inference from experimental and observational data and for testing the model’s validity. Balanced approach with equal emphasis on probability, fundamental concepts of statistics, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, design of experiments, and regression modeling. Note: Credit given for only one (1) of STAT 312, STAT 313, STAT 333, STAT 433. Prereq: MATH 122 or equivalent.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 9:15-11:00

Instructor: Qimin Huang

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

USNA 289W: Epidemics in History

The history of epidemics and pandemics, with particular focus on: the Black Death, cholera and influenza in the 19th and 20th centuries, AIDS, and COVID19. Topics will include social origins of epidemics, the evolution of scientific responses, stigma and blame, the comparative study of political responses, and long-term social and cultural effects of outbreaks. Students cannot earn credit for USNA 289W and HSTY 396 (Topic: Epidemics in History).

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 10:30-1:00

Instructor: Jonathan Sadowsky

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, SAGES

WGST 124: Sex and the City: Gender & Urban History

Gender is an identity and an experience written onto the spaces of the city. The urban landscape – with its streets, buildings, bridges, parks and squares – shapes and reflects gender identities and sexual relations. This course examines the relationship between gender and urban space from the 19th century to the present, giving special attention to the city of Cleveland. Using Cleveland as our case study, this course will explore some of the many ways in which cities and the inhabitants of cities have been historically sexed, gendered, and sexualized. We will explore the ways in which gender was reflected and constructed by the built environment, as well as how urban space and urban life shaped gender and sexual identities. The course is organized thematically and explores different aspects of city life such as prostitution, urban crime, labor, politics, urban renewal and decay, consumption and leisure and the ways in which sex and gender intersects with these issues. In addition to reading and analyzing secondary and primary sources, we will also experience ourselves how gender is being written onto the urban landscape by walking in the city and going to its museums.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 1:00-3:30

Instructor: Einav Rabinovitch-Fox

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Women's and Gender Studies

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