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5 Week Session Courses


BIOL 215: Cells and Proteins

Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on membranes, energy conversion organelles and cytoskeleton); protein structure-function; enzyme kinetics, cellular energetics, and cell communication and motility strategies. Requirements to enroll: 1) Undergraduate degree seeking student; AND 2) Previous enrollment in BIOL 214 and (CHEM 105 or CHEM 111); AND Previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 106 or ENGR 145; OR Requisites Not Met permission.

 

 

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Julie Denker

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 302: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does my brain learn and how can its learning best be facilitated?” Each student is required to develop a comprehensive theory about personal learning. These theories will take the form of a major paper which will be expanded and modified throughout the semester. Readings and class discussions will focus on the following topics: learning and education systems, major structures of the brain and their role in learning, neuronal wiring of the brain and how learning changes it, the emotional brain and its essential role in learning, language and the brain, the role of images in learning, memory and learning (and related pathologies, such as PTSD). Students are expected to incorporate information on these topics into their personal theory of learning. In so doing, students are expected to articulate meaningful questions, skillfully employ research and apply their own knowledge to address such questions, produce clear, precise academic prose to explicate their ideas, and provide relevant and constructive criticism during class discussions. Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322. Counts as a SAGES Departmental Seminar course. Prereq: Undergraduate Student or Requisites Not Met Permission.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MWF 9-11:20am

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

CHEM 105: Principles of Chemistry I

Atomic structure; thermochemistry; periodicity, bonding and molecular structure; intermolecular forces; properties of solids; liquids, gases and solutions. Recommended preparation: One year of high school chemistry.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 10:30-12:20

Instructor: Drew Meyer

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 113: Principles of Chemistry Laboratory

A one semester laboratory based on quantitative chemical measurements. Experiments include analysis, synthesis and characterization, thermochemistry and chemical kinetics. Computer analysis of data is a key part of all experiments. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or ENGR 145.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTWR 1-2pm, lab MTWR 2-5pm

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 223: Introductory Organic Chemistry I

Introductory course for science majors and engineering students. Develops themes of structure and bonding along with elementary reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers as well as an introduction to spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 106 or ENGR 145.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTWR 10:30am-12:20pm

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 233: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: (CHEM 106 or ENGR 145) and CHEM 113. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTWR 1-2pm, lab MTWR 2-5pm

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 233: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: (CHEM 106 or ENGR 145) and CHEM 113. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

 

 

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 1-2pm, lab MTWR 2-5pm

Instructor: Gregory Tochtrop

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 301: Introductory Physical Chemistry I

First of a two-semester sequence covering principles and applications of physical chemistry, intended for chemistry and engineering majors and other students having primary interests in biochemical, biological or life-science areas. States and properties of matter. Thermodynamics and its application to chemical and biochemical systems. Chemical equilibrium. Electrochemistry. Recommended preparation: One year each of undergraduate physics and calculus, preferably including partial derivatives. Prereq: CHEM 106 or ENGR 145.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Clemens Burda

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 328/428: Introductory Biochemistry I

A survey of biochemistry with a strong emphasis on the chemical logic underlying the structure, function, and evolution of biomolecules. Amino acids and protein structure, purification, and analysis. DNA, RNA, genes, and genomes. DNA replication, repair, and recombination. RNA synthesis and processing. Protein synthesis and turnover, control of gene expression. Hemoglobin. Drug development. Enzyme kinetics, catalytic and regulatory strategies. Carbohydrates. Offered as CHEM 328 and CHEM 428. Prereq: CHEM 224 or CHEM 323.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 1-2:50

Instructor: Rekha Srinivasan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 341/441: Functional Nanomaterials

This course is designed to introduce important concepts on the fundamental physical and chemical properties of technologically important nanometer scale materials. The course will cover an overview of the scientific principles pertaining to new properties at the nanoscale; synthesis and characterization tools; and existing and emerging applications of nanomaterials. It will center on current research developments on major classes of functional nanomaterials, including plasmonic nanoparticles, quantum dots, nanomagnets, carbon nanotubes, nanocatalysts and hybrid inorganic/organic nanostructures. In addition an emphasis will be placed on understanding the broader societal, economical and environmental impact of the scientific and technological advances brought forward by nanotechnology. Offered as CHEM 341 and CHEM 441.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: Anna Samia

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CLSC 193: The Ancient World

Ancient history from the origins of civilization in Mesopotamia to the dissolution of the Roman Empire in the West. Lectures and discussion. Fulfills Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement. Cross-listed as HSTY 193 (formerly known as CLSC 201/HSTY 200).

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MWF 1-3:20pm

Instructor: Aaron Beek

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Classics

COGS 322: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does my brain learn and how can its learning best be facilitated?” Each student is required to develop a comprehensive theory about personal learning. These theories will take the form of a major paper which will be expanded and modified throughout the semester. Readings and class discussions will focus on the following topics: learning and education systems, major structures of the brain and their role in learning, neuronal wiring of the brain and how learning changes it, the emotional brain and its essential role in learning, language and the brain, the role of images in learning, memory and learning (and related pathologies, such as PTSD). Students are expected to incorporate information on these topics into their personal theory of learning. In so doing, students are expected to articulate meaningful questions, skillfully employ research and apply their own knowledge to address such questions, produce clear, precise academic prose to explicate their ideas, and provide relevant and constructive criticism during class discussions. Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322. Counts as a SAGES Departmental Seminar course. Prereq: Undergraduate Student or Requisites Not Met Permission.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MWF 9-11:20am

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Cognitive Science

HSTY 193: The Ancient World

Ancient history from the origins of civilization in Mesopotamia to the dissolution of the Roman Empire in the West. Lectures and discussion. Fulfills Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement. Cross-listed as CLSC 193 (formerly known as CLSC 201/HSTY 200).

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MWF 1-3:20pm

Instructor: Aaron Beek

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

PHYS 115: Introductory Physics I

First part of a two-semester sequence directed primarily towards students working towards a B.A. in science, with an emphasis on the life sciences. Kinematics; Newton’s laws; gravitation; simple harmonic motion; mechanical waves; fluids; ideal gas law; heat and the first and second laws of thermodynamics. This course has a laboratory component. Students may earn credit for only one of the following courses: PHYS 115, PHYS 121, PHYS 123.

 

 

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous, lab M 10-10:50am

Instructor: Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 121: General Physics I – Mechanics

Particle dynamics, Newton’s laws of motion, energy and momentum conservation, rotational motion, and angular momentum conservation. This course has a laboratory component. Recommended preparation: MATH 121 or MATH 123 or MATH 125 or one year of high school calculus. Students who do not have the appropriate background should not enroll in PHYS 121 without first consulting the instructor. Students may earn credit for only one of the following courses: PHYS 115, PHYS 121, PHYS 123

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: MTWR 10:30am-12:15pm

Instructor: Corbin Covault, Mhlambululi Mafu, Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

SOCI 203: Human Development: Medical and Social

This course will provide students with an introduction to key concepts, principles, and debates in the field of human development. We will examine how biological and psychological development interact with — and are shaped by — social environments and forces. These can include families, schools, neighborhoods, peer groups, and workplaces, as well as broader forces such as ideology, policy, and culture. We will explore how patterns of human development that have been taken as “normal” in the modern era can differ greatly across societies and through social change.

 

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: Online course

Session: Online

Time: asynchronous

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SPAN 315: Latin America Cultural Conflicts

Evolution of Latin American socioeconomic characteristics and artistic production up to the present. Class discussions of diverse literary works, social research essays, and testimonials focus on conflicting elements in class structures, ethnicity, and urban modernization as well as family ethos, religious trends, cultural identity, and educational problems. Offered as SPAN 315 and SPAN 415. Counts as a CAS Global & Cultural Diversity course. Prereq: SPAN 202.

Dates: June 3 - July 10, 2024

Session: 5 Week Session

Dates: In-person course

Session: On campus

Time: MTW 9-11:20am

Instructor: Jacqueline Nanfito

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

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