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New 2020 Summer Courses


ANTH 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-June 26, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MWF 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2020 Summer

ANTH 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2020 Summer

ARAB 101 : Beginning Arabic I

The course introduces learners of Arabic to the sound and writing systems of this language and provides them with basic structural and lexical knowledge to enable them to say things in Arabic, such as greeting others, thanking someone, introducing oneself, describing one’s background, seeking and providing info and so forth. The ability to perform these language functions in real-life or lifelike situations is developed by engaging the learner in structured functional activities and grammatical exercises.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-June 26, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWF 10:30-12:30

Instructor: Ramez Islambouli

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2020 Summer

ARTH 102: Art History II: Michelangelo to Maya Lin

The second half of a two-semester survey of world art highlighting the major monuments of art made in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe from 1400 to the present. Special emphasis on visual analysis, historical and sociocultural contexts, and objects in the Cleveland Museum of Art.

 

This course has been canceled for Summer 2020. 

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 3:00-4:30

Instructor: Russell Green

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, New 2020 Summer

ARTH 230 – Ancient Roman Art and Architecture

This survey course explores the history of Roman art and architecture from Rome’s founding in 753 B.C. up through the reign of Constantine (A.D. 306-337). Students learn how to analyze works of art and architecture in terms of form, function, and iconography. Particular emphasis is placed on situating objects and monuments within the changing historical, cultural, political, and religious contexts of ancient Rome, including major changes such as the shift from the Roman Republic to the Roman Empire and the advent of Christianity. Students will study a variety of media–such as statues, painting, metalwork, and domestic and public architecture–from the city of Rome itself as well as Roman provinces as far afield as Asia Minor and North Africa. The course will introduce students to famous buildings such as the Colosseum and the Pantheon but also to lesser known but equally important works. As we study major objects and monuments from ancient Rome, we will consider questions of design, patronage, artistic agency, viewer reception, and cultural identity. We will also consider Rome’s complex relationship to Greek culture and attempt to answer the question of what makes Roman art distinctively “Roman.”
Offered as ARTH 230 and CLSC 230.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2020. 

Dates: May 11-May 29, 2020

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 10:00-12:30

Instructor: Maggie Popkin

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, New 2020 Summer

ARTS 322: Digital Photography I

Introduction of color and digital photography. A systematic approach to the digital photography workflow and its application to creative photography. History of the medium. Field and computer lab work. Advanced amateur digital camera required.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 10:00-1:00

Instructor: Barney Taxel

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio, New 2020 Summer

ASTR 101 – Introduction to the Sun and Its Planets

This introductory astronomy course describes our solar system of planets and how astronomers develop our physical understanding about the universe. Topics include the properties of the Sun and planets; the formation of the solar system and how the planets have evolved over time; asteroids, comets, and dwarf planets; and a comparison of our solar system with new planetary systems being found around other stars. This course has no pre-requisites.

 

This course has been canceled for Summer 2020. 

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 10:30-12:00

Instructor: Jeffrey Kriessler

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Astronomy, New 2020 Summer

ASTR 103 – Introduction to the Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe

This introductory astronomy course describes the universe we live in and how astronomers develop our physical understanding about it. Topics covered include: the properties of stars; the formation, evolution, and death of stars; white dwarfs, pulsars, and black holes; spiral and elliptical galaxies; the Big Bang and the expansion of the Universe. This course has no pre-requisites.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Instructor: William Janesh

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Astronomy, New 2020 Summer, Online

BIOL 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-June 26, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MWF 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2020 Summer

BIOL 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2020 Summer

BIOL 326/426: Genetics

Transmission genetics, nature of mutation, microbial genetics, somatic cell genetics, recombinant DNA techniques and their application to genetics, human genome mapping, plant breeding, transgenic plants and animals, uniparental inheritance, evolution, and quantitative genetics.
Offered as BIOL 326 and BIOL 426.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Instructor: Polly Mason

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2020 Summer

CHEM 398: Undergraduate Research/Senior Capstone Project: Capstone research in Functional Food Chemistry and Health

Independent research project within a research group in the chemistry department or, by petition, within a research group in another Case department. Arrangements should be made by consultation with the faculty member selected and the Senior Capstone Committee of the chemistry department. Open to all chemistry majors and other qualified students. Satisfies the research requirement for Honors in Chemistry. A written report and public oral presentations are required.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 10:30-12:30

Instructor: Rekha Srinivasan

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Chemistry, New 2020 Summer

CHIN 350/350D: China and Green Cultural Transformation

Taught in Chinese, this course aims at enhancing the students’ proficiency in listening to, speaking, reading and writing Chinese at the intermediate and higher levels. As a content-driven course, it introduces students to the recent major green culture movements in China, focusing on the way the green cultural changes took place in relation to globalization, environment and climate protection, technology innovation, income redistribution, domestic consumption, and education, to meet the challenges of financial crisis, climate change, energy insecurity, and international competition. At the end of the semester, the students are expected to be able to understand readings and audiovisual materials, as well as communicate and present orally and in written formats green cultural issues covered in the course. Students who take CHIN350 are not allowed to earn credit for CHIN350D (Department Seminar), vice versa.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: May 11-May 29, 2020

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 8:00-10:40

Instructor: Peter Yang

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2020 Summer

CLSC 230: Ancient Roman Art and Architecture

This survey course explores the history of Roman art and architecture from Rome’s founding in 753 B.C. up through the reign of Constantine (A.D. 306-337). Students learn how to analyze works of art and architecture in terms of form, function, and iconography. Particular emphasis is placed on situating objects and monuments within the changing historical, cultural, political, and religious contexts of ancient Rome, including major changes such as the shift from the Roman Republic to the Roman Empire and the advent of Christianity. Students will study a variety of media–such as statues, painting, metalwork, and domestic and public architecture–from the city of Rome itself as well as Roman provinces as far afield as Asia Minor and North Africa. The course will introduce students to famous buildings such as the Colosseum and the Pantheon but also to lesser known but equally important works. As we study major objects and monuments from ancient Rome, we will consider questions of design, patronage, artistic agency, viewer reception, and cultural identity. We will also consider Rome’s complex relationship to Greek culture and attempt to answer the question of what makes Roman art distinctively “Roman.”
Offered as ARTH 230 and CLSC 230.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2020. 

Dates: May 11-May 29, 2020

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 10:00-12:30

Instructor: Maggie Popkin

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Classics, New 2020 Summer

COGS 202: Cognition and Culture

This course studies the human mind in its natural environment: culture. It covers the fundamental methods, findings, and theories that attempt to understand the growth and evolution of cognition from either a social science or humanistic standpoint. It provides the student with background knowledge of theories of human cultural evolution and change, of the relationship between the cognizing individual and larger social-cognitive structures, and of such phenomena as distributed networks, cooperative mental work, and the phenomenology of human experience. Many disciplines have contributed to this knowledge; hence the approach of this course is cross-disciplinary, including ideas from cultural anthropology, literary studies, art and art history, musicology, philosophy, and the history of technology, among others.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-June 26, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWRF 10:00-11:45

Instructor: William Deal

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Cognitive Science, New 2020 Summer

EECS 132: Introduction to Programming in Java

An introduction to modern programming language features, computer programming and algorithmic problem solving with an emphasis on the Java language. Computers and code compilation; conditional statements, subprograms, loops, methods; object-oriented design, inheritance and polymorphism, abstract classes and interfaces; types, type systems, generic types, abstract data types, strings, arrays, linked lists; software development, modular code design, unit testing; strings, text and file I/O; GUI components, GUI event handling; threads; comparison of Java to C, C++, and C#.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MT 1:30-3:30; MT 3:30-5:15

Instructor: Orhan Ozguner

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, New 2020 Summer

EECS 281: Logic Design and Computer Organization

Fundamentals of digital systems in terms of both computer organization and logic level design. Organization of digital computers; information representation; boolean algebra; analysis and synthesis of combinational and sequential circuits; datapaths and register transfers; instruction sets and assembly language; input/output and communication; memory.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: 6/01/2020-7/19/2020

Time: TR 1:00-3:30; W 1:30-3:30

Instructor: Evren Gurkan Cavusoglu

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, New 2020 Summer

EECS 302: Discrete Mathematics

A general introduction to basic mathematical terminology and the techniques of abstract mathematics in the context of discrete mathematics. Topics introduced are mathematical reasoning, Boolean connectives, deduction, mathematical induction, sets, functions and relations, algorithms, graphs, combinatorial reasoning.
Offered as EECS 302 and MATH 304.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: May 11-May 29, 2020

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:30:12:35

Instructor: Shuai Xu

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, New 2020 Summer

EECS 340: Algorithms

Fundamentals in algorithm design and analysis. Loop invariants, asymptotic notation, recurrence relations, sorting algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, basic graph algorithms.
Offered as EECS 340 and EECS 340N.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTW 9:30-11:30

Instructor: Orhan Ozguner

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, New 2020 Summer

EECS 404: Digital Control Systems

Analysis and design techniques for computer based control systems. Sampling, hybrid continuous-time/discrete-time system modeling; sampled data and state space representations, controllability, observability and stability, transformation of analog controllers, design of deadbeat and state feedback controllers; pole placement controllers based on input/output models, introduction to model identification, optimal control and adaptive control. Recommended Preparation: EECS 304 or equivalent.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Instructor: Sree Sreenath

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, New 2020 Summer

EECS 490: Digital Image Processing

Digital images are introduced as two-dimensional sampled arrays of data. The course begins with one-to-one operations such as image addition and subtraction and image descriptors such as the histogram. Basic filters such as the gradient and Laplacian in the spatial domain are used to enhance images. The 2-D Fourier transform is introduced and frequency domain operations such as high and low-pass filtering are developed. It is shown how filtering techniques can be used to remove noise and other image degradation. The different methods of representing color images are described and fundamental concepts of color image transformations and color image processing are developed. One or more advanced topics such as wavelets, image compression, and pattern recognition will be covered as time permits. Programming assignments using software such as MATLAB will illustrate the application and implementation of digital image processing.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 2:30-4:10

Instructor: Ming-Chun Huang

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, New 2020 Summer

EEPS 115: Introduction to Oceanography

The sciences of oceanography. Physical, chemical, biologic, and geologic features and processes of the oceans. Differences and similarities between the oceans and large lakes including the Great Lakes. Required: Sunday field trip.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Instructor: Sharmila Giri

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, New 2020 Summer

EEPS 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-June 26, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MWF 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, New 2020 Summer

EEPS 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, New 2020 Summer

EMAE 290: Computer-Aided Manufacturing

An advanced design and manufacturing engineering course covering a wide range of topics associated with the ‘design for manufacturability’ concept.  Students will be introduced to a number of advanced solid modeling assignments (CAD), rapid prototyping (RP), and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM).  In addition students will be introduced to computer numerical control (CNC) manual part-programming for CNC milling and turning machine tools.

All students will be given a design project requiring all detail and assembly drawings for a fully engineered design.

The course has two (50) minute lectures and one (110) minute CAD/CAM Lab per week.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Instructor: Jason Bradshaw

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, New 2020 Summer

EMSE 515: Analytical Methods in Materials Science

Microcharacterization techniques of materials science and engineering: SPM (scanning probe microscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscopy), FIB (focused ion beam) techniques, SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry), EPMA (electron probe microanalysis), XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectrometry), and AES (Auger electron spectrometry), ESCA (electron spectrometry for chemical analysis). The course includes theory, application examples, and laboratory demonstrations.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 15-July 27, 2020

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MTWRF 1:00-2:15

Instructor: Frank Ernst

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Materials Science & Engineering, New 2020 Summer

ENGL 257A: Introduction to the Novel

Introductory readings in the novel. May be organized chronologically or thematically. Some attention to the novel as a historically situated genre.

 

This course has been canceled for Summer 2020. 

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TR 1:00-3:15

Instructor: Michelle Lyons-Mcfarland

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, New 2020 Summer

ENGL 270 – Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory.  An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion.  It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: May 11-May 29, 2020

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, New 2020 Summer

ENGL 285: Special Topics Seminar: Climate Change and Pandemic

Explores the shared terrain between Climate Change films and writing (Cli-Fi) and cultural expressions that dramatize pandemics. While the common fare of Cli-Fi centers on speculative and dystopian fiction, this course also attends substantially to what Rebecca Solnit has framed as “hope in the dark” as she writes of “extraordinary communities that arise in disaster.” More than just a recipe for gloomy summer reading, this course invites participants to consider how we define our humanity–individually and collectively–as we envision consequential cultural, environmental, economic, and political paths to navigate public health crises.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TR 2:30-3:45

Instructor: Matthew Burkhart

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, New 2020 Summer

ETHS 243: Bollywood and Social Justice: Contemporary Bollywood Movies with a Social Message

India, where over-the-top, melodramatic films dominate, produces more than 1,000 films a year. With lavish action sequences punctuated by periodic songs in picturesque locales, these films, popularly referred to as Bollywood, traditionally have been known for depicting imaginary worlds, very far from reality. Among these are movies that are deeply immersed in issues of religion, religious conflict, caste, and social injustice. These issues range from ones concerning purity and the class system and Hindu-Muslim conflict, to women’s rights and human trafficking. This class will be looking at a number of Bollywood films with focal points of matters pertaining to social justice. Students will learn about the foundations of these inequalities and intolerances so that they can more completely understand the themes addressed in the movies.
Offered as ETHS 243 and RLGN 243.

 

This course has been canceled for Summer 2020. 

Dates: June 1-June 26, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWR 12:00-2:15

Instructor: Deepak Sarma

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Ethnic Studies, New 2020 Summer

HSTY 113: Introduction to Modern World History

The history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in global context. Emphasis on the forces that have created or shaped the modern world: industrialization and technological change; political ideas and movements such as nationalism; European imperialism and decolonization; and the interplay of cultural values.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:30-11:50

Instructor: Jay Geller

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2020 Summer

HSTY 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-June 26, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MWF 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2020 Summer

HSTY 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2020 Summer

HSTY 241: Inventing Public Health

The core principle of this course is that public health is a concept that was formed in different ways at different times in different places. It had no existence as we know it before the nineteenth century, but course participants will learn how it grew out of an ancient tradition of the political elite’s concern that its subjects were a threat to them and the stability of the realm. Course participants will discover how, in the nineteenth century, it became a professional practice as we know it and realized advances in human health, longevity, and security perhaps greater than any made since. At the same time, the course will also cover how many of the assumptions of those that inaugurated public health were completely alien to present-day practitioners–even though in many ways it is a practice that helped inaugurate the modern world so familiar to us. Course participants will learn about the close relationship between public health agencies and agendas and various kinds of social authority: political power, moral influence, colonial power, and others. Ultimately, the aim of the course is to show participants that even though public health seems a supremely common sense practice, it had a highly contested birth and early life that was anything but natural or pre-ordained. That complicated birth continues to shape public health to this day.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 15-July 27, 2020

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TR 4:00-7:00

Instructor: John Broich

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2020 Summer

HSTY 270 – Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: May 11-May 29, 2020

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2020 Summer

HSTY 299: Topics in History: The Kent State Shootings and the “Global Sixties”

On May 4, 1970, the National Guard killed four Kent State University students who were protesting America’s involvement in Vietnam. The events that unfolded on Kent State’s campus were far from unique in the “long sixties.” In the 1960s and early 1970s, students and young people around the world mobilized and protested the war in Vietnam, racial injustice, and colonialism. Like the students at Kent State University, some died in their efforts to realize a more just and peaceful world. This course will examine the Kent State shooting through a national and global lens. We will critically examine the roots and expansion of student movements in the 1960s; how global events and transnational connections influenced the ways student activists understood political power and movement goals; and how governments and state actors responded to students and young people’s demands for social change. May 4, 2020 will mark the fiftieth anniversary of the Kent State shooting. This course will equip students to analyze how state institutions and the public choose to remember such events. In this way, the course will shed light on the politics of memory as they relate to the Kent State shooting and related events in the “global sixties.”

 

This course has been canceled for Summer 2020. 

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 2:30-5:00

Instructor: David Busch

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2020 Summer

HSTY 396/496: Advanced Topics in History: History of Epidemics

Advanced topics in history, changing from semester to semester. The course provides students an opportunity to explore special themes or theoretical issues in history that are too briefly covered in broader surveys. Students may take this course more than once for credit, when different topics are covered.

This course will look at the history of epidemics and pandemics, focusing on select cases. Topics will include social origins of epidemics, the evolution of scientific responses, stigma and blame, the comparative study of political responses, and long-term social and cultural effects of outbreaks. In most weeks, there will be a choice of readings.

Offered as HSTY 396 and HSTY 496.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 10:30-1:00

Instructor: Jonathan Sadowsky

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2020 Summer

ITAL 101: Elementary Italian I

Introductory course; stress on mastery of the sound system and basic sentence structure of spoken and written Italian. Independent laboratory practice is a requirement.

 

This course has been canceled for Summer 2020. 

Dates: June 1-June 26, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MWF 9:00-11:55

Instructor: Denise Caterinacci

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2020 Summer

ITAL 102: Elementary Italian II

Continuation of ITAL 101; independent laboratory practice is required in addition to scheduled class meetings.

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 9:00-11:55

Instructor: Denise Caterinacci

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2020 Summer

JAPN 101: Elementary Japanese I

Introduction to understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Japanese. Students learn to read and write hiragana and katakana syllabaries and 50 kanji characters. Students are expected to achieve control of the sound system and basic structure of the language. Emphasizes aural comprehension and speaking.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-June 26, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWR 8:30-11:30

Instructor: Yukiko Nishida

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2020 Summer

JAPN 102: Elementary Japanese II

Continuation of JAPN 101. Emphasizes aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn approximately 100 new kanji characters. Recommended preparation: JAPN 101.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 8:30-11:30

Instructor: Margaret Fitzgerald

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2020 Summer

MATH 304: Discrete Mathematics

A general introduction to basic mathematical terminology and the techniques of abstract mathematics in the context of discrete mathematics. Topics introduced are mathematical reasoning, Boolean connectives, deduction, mathematical induction, sets, functions and relations, algorithms, graphs, combinatorial reasoning.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: May 11-May 29, 2020

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:30:12:35

Instructor: Shuai Xu

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics, New 2020 Summer

MGMT 205: Essentials of Personal Finance

This course will provide students of all disciplines with an essential foundation in personal finance. The course will focus on four core areas of personal finance: 1) Budgeting & saving, 2) Investing, 3) Obtaining credit & controlling debt, and 4) Minimizing financial risk through the use of insurance. The course will also cover the essentials of personal taxation, retirement planning, and estate planning. This course will enable students to gain the fundamental knowledge and skills needed to make wise financial decisions as they move forward in life, which in turn will impact their ability to function as productive leaders in the workplace and financially literate citizens. A student may not receive credit for both MGMT 205 and MGMT 395 with the topic “Achieving Personal Financial Security.”

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 12:00-1:00

Instructor: Karen W. Braun

Credits: 1 credit

Departments: Accounting, , Management, New 2020 Summer

MGMT 206: Personal Financial Management with Digital Technology

In the digital era, financial technologies have worked its way into our digital wallets and portfolio. Mobile banking services, budgeting and investing apps are inextricably linked with how we conduct our personal finances. While financial literacy deals with underlying finance concepts such as time value of money, compounding, budgeting and investing, financial technologies dictate how we access tools to carry out day-to-day budgeting, investing and consuming. In the digital era, financial technologies, Fintech, serves as an enabler of financial literacy, FinLit. While technology is not a substitute for literacy, Fintech complements literacy. Technology has created a level playing field and has advanced the access to credit and investments.
This course will cover four areas:
1. Comparing banking services and costs
2. Digital banking: Using mobile apps and financial technologies for financial management and decision making
3. Personal finance and digital money
4. Risks in the digital era: Identity protection

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-June 26, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MWF 2:00-3:00

Instructor: Lakshmi Balasubramanyan

Credits: 1 credit

Departments: Finance, Management, New 2020 Summer

MUTH 103: Music Theory I

Music theory for the nonmusic major. Intervals, scales, rhythmic drill, sight singing, eartraining, keyboard work, and harmony through inversions of triads and seventh chords. Not open to music majors.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 15-July 27, 2020

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MWF 1:00-2:30

Instructor: Allen Yueh

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Music, New 2020 Summer

MUTH 312: Eighteenth Century Counterpoint

Analysis and writing of inventions in two parts, and fugues in three and four parts. Recommended preparation: MUTH 202 or MUTH 206.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 15-July 27, 2020

Session: 6 Week Session

Instructor: Timothy Cutler

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Music, New 2020 Summer

MUTH 320: Form and Analysis

Aural and visual analysis of structural and stylistic features of 16th through 20th century music.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 15-July 27, 2020

Session: 6 Week Session

Instructor: Marshall Griffith

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Music, New 2020 Summer

PHIL 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-June 26, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MWF 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, Philosophy

PHIL 225: Evolution

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Patricia Princehouse

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, Philosophy

PHIL 270 – Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: May 11-May 29, 2020

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, Philosophy

PHIL 310: Philosophy of Medicine

The current pandemic has brought into public view a broad range of philosophical questions raised connected with the practice of medicine. In this course, we will grapple with metaphysical, epistemological, ethical, social, and political questions that confront health workers, researchers, and policy makers in their efforts to maintain and improve human health on an individual and group level. Metaphysical: Are viruses alive? Can groups be infected? To what extent are groups of humans ‘superorganisms’ like ant colonies? What is a disease? Epistemological: How do we manage risk under uncertainty? At what point does research on COVID-19 become knowledge? Who decides? At what point do preventative measures need to be taken? When the disease is identified, or only until it is nearby? How do we determine a reasonable trade-off between (a) deepening our knowledge of a virus, and (b) developing a safe and effective treatment for it? Ethical/Sociopolitical: How do we weigh the costs to individual freedoms against the benefits to society when we take top-down measures to slow the spread of the disease? How ought we to weigh our social need to slow the spread of the disease against the social costs of shutting down large sectors of the economy?

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:30-3:45

Instructor: Christopher Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, Philosophy

PHIL 410: Philosophy of Medicine

The current pandemic has brought into public view a broad range of philosophical questions connected with the practice of medicine. In this course, we will grapple with metaphysical, epistemological, ethical, social, and political questions that confront health workers, researchers, and policy makers in their efforts to maintain and improve human health on an individual and group level. Metaphysical: Are viruses alive? Can groups be infected? To what extent are groups of humans ‘superorganisms’ like ant colonies? What is a disease? Epistemological: How do we manage risk under uncertainty? At what point does research on COVID-19 become knowledge? Who decides? At what point do preventative measures need to be taken? When the disease is identified, or only until it is nearby? How do we determine a reasonable trade-off between (a) deepening our knowledge of a virus, and (b) developing a safe and effective treatment for it? Ethical/Sociopolitical: How do we weigh the costs to individual freedoms against the benefits to society when we take top-down measures to slow the spread of the disease? How ought we to weigh our social need to slow the spread of the disease against the social costs of shutting down large sectors of the economy?
Offered as PHIL 310 and PHIL 410.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: July 6-July 31, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:30-3:45

Instructor: Christopher Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, Philosophy

PHYS 333: Science and Technology in France

The course is an exploration of the development of science and technology in France, its rise in the 18th and 19th century, its subsequent decline until the mid-20th century, and its more recent renaissance–from both a scientific and humanities perspective. A significant component will focus on the contributions of women to science in France. Students will visit historical sites such as Marie Curie’s laboratory and the Foucault pendulum, as well as current research facilities such as the Soleil Synchrotron outside of Paris and the Large Hadron Collider in France/Switzerland. To supplement these site visits, readings will come from the fields of science and technology (e.g., popular journals such as Scientific American), history, and French literature–either in French or English translation as appropriate for the student and the enrollment choice.
Offered as FRCH 328, FRCH 428, PHYS 333, WGST 333, WLIT 353 and WLIT 453.

For more information, please visit the course website.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2020. 

Dates: May 10-May 29, 2020

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: Cheryl Toman and Charles Rosenblatt

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, Physics, Study Abroad

POSC 334/434: Comparative Political Violence

This is a non-standard, simulation based course analyzing the causes and processes of political violence in comparative perspective. The course begins by engaging some classic philosophical work on power, conflict, and violence. It then moves to specific cases drawn at different historical periods and from across the world (North America, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East). For each case, students are organized into groups representing actual political actors. Collaborative research and written assignments serve to prepare each group for an in-class simulation exercise. Simulations vary in format and goals but each comprises a group grade and an individual written project.
Offered as POSC 334 and POSC 434.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: May 11-May 29, 2020

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Pete Moore

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, Political Science

RLGN 243: Bollywood and Social Justice: Contemporary Bollywood Movies with a Social Message

India, where over-the-top, melodramatic films dominate, produces more than 1,000 films a year. With lavish action sequences punctuated by periodic songs in picturesque locales, these films, popularly referred to as Bollywood, traditionally have been known for depicting imaginary worlds, very far from reality. Among these are movies that are deeply immersed in issues of religion, religious conflict, caste, and social injustice. These issues range from ones concerning purity and the class system and Hindu-Muslim conflict, to women’s rights and human trafficking. This class will be looking at a number of Bollywood films with focal points of matters pertaining to social justice. Students will learn about the foundations of these inequalities and intolerances so that they can more completely understand the themes addressed in the movies.
Offered as ETHS 243 and RLGN 243.

 

This course has been canceled for Summer 2020. 

Dates: June 1-June 26, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWR 12:00-2:15

Instructor: Deepak Sarma

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, Religious Studies

RLGN 270 – Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: May 11-May 29, 2020

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, Religious Studies

SOCI 201 – Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: May 11-May 29, 2020

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, Sociology

SPAN 101M: Elementary Medical Spanish

A study of Spanish related to health professions. Students will gain familiarity with basic written and oral vocabulary and basic grammatical structures for the assessment and communication of Spanish-speaking patients in a variety of settings. Students will also learn vocabulary used in the regular Spanish 101 class. No previous experience with the Spanish language is required. No prerequisites needed or medical background. This course is for students that have not taken Spanish before or have minimum knowledge of the language. Student who successfully completes this course is eligible to take Span 102.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-June 26, 2020

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWRF 9:00-10:45

Instructor: Elena Fernandez

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2020 Summer

STAT 201: Basic Statistics for Social and Life Sciences

Designed for undergraduates in the social sciences and life sciences who need to use statistical techniques in their fields. Descriptive statistics, probability models, sampling distributions. Point and confidence interval estimation, hypothesis testing. Elementary regression and analysis of variance. Not for credit toward major or minor in Statistics.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

 

Dates: May 11-May 29, 2020

Session: May Term

Instructor: Paula Fitzgibbon

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics, New 2020 Summer

USNA 287T: Conflicts and Controversies in American Science and Technology

How do changes in science and technology affect American life? How do cultural ideas shape scientific practice? Is technological progress inevitable, or do we get to decide what changes we want and which ones we don’t? How do we make ethical choices about science and technology in a world with inherent power imbalances?

This course provides an introduction to thinking through these questions by presenting works by historians, anthropologists, political scientists, philosophers, journalists, and others to explore a range of social issues in modern science and technology. After two weeks of introduction, the course is divided into four sections: (a) Biology, Biotech, and Biomedicine; (b) Science Policy and the Politics of Science; (c) Problems in Social Science; and (d) Computers and Other Thinking Machines. While the course’s content is arranged around these topics, its main purposes are to develop critical thinking skills around ubiquitous and contentious subjects of science, technology, power, culture, and values as well as to hone skills in reading, speaking, research, and essay writing.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 4:00-5:30

Instructor: Peter Shulman

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, SAGES

USNA 288W: Medieval Sciences and Human Difference: How Did Medieval Peoples Define Humanity?

Since the beginning of recorded history, humans have employed different approaches to defining themselves in relation to the natural world. Along with folklore, religion and philosophy, science has been an important means to define concepts we now refer to as race/ethnicity, dis/ability, sexuality, and gender. However, what constituted science and scientific inquiry varied widely based on culture and historical context. Most recently, our advancing understanding of genetics has produced ever more nuanced definitions of human difference, even as we have come to recognize that such explanations often compete with theories that are grounded in social and cultural values, rather than scientific observation. How did people explain human diversity in the 1000 years before the Scientific Revolution unfolded in Europe?
In this seminar, we will investigate how different medieval cultures explained humanity and human diversity by sampling examples of medical observation, philosophy, theories about the natural world, cultural prejudice, and religious belief. In particular, we will consider how Greek, Roman, Chinese, Indian, Islamicate, and early European theories of human difference shaped justifications for conquest as, gender roles and sexuality, often in surprising ways. Questions we will ask include: How did medieval people differentiate humans from animals? Did they use the same categories of race, gender, and sexuality that we use? How did scientific thinking evolve to construct these taxonomies of difference? How were ideas shared cross-culturally? To explore these questions, we will read primary texts in translation from the medieval period. Through our discussions, we will consider not only what other approaches to defining human differences can teach us, but how they provide historical insight into frameworks and assumptions about diversity today.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTW 2:00-3:30

Instructor: Lisa Nielson

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, SAGES

USNA 289W: Epidemics in History

The history of epidemics and pandemics, with particular focus on: the Black Death, cholera and influenza in the 19th and 20th centuries, AIDS, and COVID19. Topics will include social origins of epidemics, the evolution of scientific responses, stigma and blame, the comparative study of political responses, and long-term social and cultural effects of outbreaks. Students cannot earn credit for USNA 289W and HSTY 396 (Topic: Epidemics in History).

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 2, 2020

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 10:30-1:00

Instructor: Jonathan Sadowsky

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, SAGES

USSO 285T: Why We Believe Weird Things

How, in such a skeptical age, can people maintain questionable beliefs regarding urban legends, alternative medicine, superstitions, and paranormal phenomena? How do cults manage to attract and maintain large memberships? How can so many seemingly normal people come to the conclusion that they have been abducted by aliens? We will explore the idea that these behaviors are not examples of pathological thought processes, but rather natural consequences of the biases that characterize everyday reasoning. Emphasis will be placed on critical examination of questionable phenomena with a goal of understanding why people might want to hold such beliefs.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWR 5:00-6:30

Instructor: Jennifer Butler

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, SAGES

USSO 293B: Epidemics and American Identity

Where does American identity come from? While some have argued that it is the product of the rugged American landscape, or the ideals of individual liberty and free enterprise, or the amalgamation of cultures brought together by diverse population, this seminar proposes a radically different possibility. What if American identity has been crucially shaped by epidemics and infectious disease? In this seminar, we will examine three of the most devastating epidemics in American history: Yellow Fever in the 1790s, Spanish Flu in 1918, and HIV/AIDS in the early 1980s. Using historical accounts as well and fictional representations, we will consider how individuals experienced these outbreaks, as well as various social and governmental responses. We will focus especially on how these diseases affected personal and national identity. When epidemics such as these happen, what has been the reaction of the medical system and the government? How does the experience of disease shape our sense of self? How do deadly epidemics shape a sense of communal and national identity? At the same time, how can they provoke the construction of “otherness,” of identities that are not considered to be part of an American “us?” How do the answers to these questions shape our thinking about the meaning of American identity, or about our potential reactions to future epidemics?

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 2:00-3:30

Instructor: Carli Leone

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, SAGES

USSY 291B: Science (Fiction) Dystopias

In 1927 the German science fiction classic Metropolis showed filmgoers a mechanized dystopian nightmare in which humans took on the roles of cogs and levers in a giant machine. Years later, George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four depicted a totalitarian regime reshaping post-war England in a similar way, using surveillance and repetitive activities to turn the population into something less than human. Appropriating science fiction motifs, dystopian narratives have forced us to reconsider how science and technology are used to complicate and at times augment our notion of what it means to be a social animal. In this class, we will consider a range of texts, including novels, short stories, films, and comic books, to explore the interaction between people and the things that they invent. The first half of the course will emphasize traditional utopian texts and readings will include selections from works like Margaret Cavendish’s Blazing World (biological utopia), Yevgeny Zamyatin’s We (mathematical dystopia), and George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four (technological dystopia). During the second half of the semester we will discuss utopian and dystopian worlds in popular fiction and film, such as science fiction short stories by Harlan Ellison, Alan Moore’s V for Vendetta, and Wall-E, to consider how the utopia/dystopia changed in the latter half of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st century.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 3:00-4:30

Instructor: Gabrielle Parkin

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, SAGES

USSY 293O: Monsters and Disability

Why are monsters everywhere in literature, film, and art? How does disability, mental illness, and medicine find their way into cultural fantasies and anxieties? Who or what are the monsters of our own cultural moment? In what ways do monsters represent and reinforce prejudices related to mental illness, disability, race, gender, religion, or nationality? What are the ethical conflicts and demands made by the monster? In this seminar, we will explore the history, art, and ethics of monsters in western culture. Using selections from disability studies, trauma theory, gender studies, critical race studies, and post-colonial studies, we will examine monsters not merely as super-natural creatures, but as figures that stand in for a wide range of “undesirables” and “others.” Readings and films for this class will be drawn from the distant medieval past up to modern horror and fantasy films, and will feature the monsters said to live on the edge of the known world, mystical visionaries, sideshow freaks, hallucinatory apparitions, witches, and even a few vampires and werewolves.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 3:00-4:30

Instructor: Gabrielle Bychowski

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, SAGES

USSY 294N: Climate Change and Pandemics: Seeking Hope in the Dark

This seminar explores the shared terrain between climate change films and writing (Cli-Fi) and cultural expressions that dramatize pandemics. While the common fare of Cli-Fi centers on dystopian and speculative fiction, this course also attends substantially to narratives addressing what Rebecca Solnit has framed as “hope in the dark” as she writes of “extraordinary communities that arise in disaster.” Among other things, we will address the overlapping challenges of writing about pandemics and climate change, which both dramatize threats to human communities and environments that unfold incrementally–and frequently at great distance in space and time from contemporary North American audiences. Further, without minimizing the magnitude of either threat, we will trace how responses to COVID-19 and Climate Change might mutually inform our efforts to mitigate both crises. More than just a recipe for gloomy summer reading and viewing, this course invites participants to consider how we define our humanity–individually and collectively–as we envision consequential cultural, environmental, economic, and political paths to navigate through global health crises.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: June 1-July 27, 2020

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TR 2:30-4:45

Instructor: Matt Burkhart

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, SAGES

WGST 201: Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women’s and gender studies major.
Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

 

This course will be delivered remotely. Students should plan to be available during the scheduled time in the Eastern Standard Time zone. Contact the instructor with questions.

Dates: May 11-May 29, 2020

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2020 Summer, Women's and Gender Studies

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