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New 2021 Summer Courses


ANTH 308: Child Policy Externship

Externships offered through CHST 398/ANTH 308 give students an opportunity to work directly with professionals who design and implement policies that impact the lives of children and their families. Agencies involved are active in areas such as public health, including behavioral health, education. juvenile justice, childcare and/or child welfare. Students apply for the externships, and selected students are placed in local public or nonprofit agencies with a policy focus. Each student develops an individualized learning plan in consultation with the Childhood Studies Program faculty and the supervisor in the agency. CHST 398/ANTH 308 is a 3 credit-hour course and may be taken twice for a total of 6 credit hours.
Offered as CHST 398 and ANTH 308.

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Instructor: Gabriella Celeste

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2021 Summer

ANTH 328: Medical Anthropology and Public Health

Anthropology has a longstanding relationship with the field of public health, which dates back to before the flourishing of medical anthropology as a subfield. Direct participation of medical anthropologists in public health research and practice continues to grow. This course explores the intersection of medical anthropology and public health from the perspective of anthropological history, theory, and methods. Course topics include: the history of anthropological work in public health, medical anthropology theory as a guide to anthropological public health research, and anthropological methods and approaches to public health work. Case studies from around the world will be employed throughout the course.
Offered as ANTH 328 and ANTH 428.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWR 1:00-3:15

Instructor: Maureen Floriano

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2021 Summer

ARTH 102: Art History II: Michelangelo to Maya Lin

The second half of a two-semester survey of world art highlighting the major monuments of art made in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe from 1400 to the present. Special emphasis on visual analysis, historical and sociocultural contexts, and objects in the Cleveland Museum of Art.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 9:00-10:20

Instructor: Angelica Verduci

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, New 2021 Summer

ARTS 106: Creative Drawing I

Development of graphic fluency in black and white through direct observation of nature and the model. Drawing as a means of enlarging visual sensitivity using a wide range of media and subject matter. Work from nude model.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered in-person. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TWR 9:00-11:55

Instructor: George Kozmon

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio, New 2021 Summer

ARTS 214: Ceramics I

The techniques of hand building in pinch, coil and slab methods. Development of sensitivity to design and form. Basic work in stoneware, earthenware, and glazing.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - July 2, 2021

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: TR 1:00-4:30

Instructor: Martha Lois

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio, New 2021 Summer

ARTS 216: Painting I

The creative, conceptual, visual, and technical aspects of painting. Style ranging from naturalism to abstraction. Work in acrylic and mixed media.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered blended (both in-person and remote). For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWR 9:00-11:55

Instructor: David King

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio, New 2021 Summer

ARTS 306: Architecture for our Time

Architecture has a major impact on the earth’s environment and on those who inhabit the earth. Decisions made during the architectural design process have a profound impact on the environmental performance of buildings and human beings ability to navigate the built environment. In this architectural design studio, students will look at architecture through a holistic lens to understand the connections among various elements and systems, and design projects will challenge students to incorporate these lessons into Innovative, well-designed, sustainable, resilient, human-centered works of architecture. This vertical summer studio is open to students at all levels of architectural experience and can be taken up to two times for credit.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - July 2, 2021

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: TR 4:00-7:30

Instructor: Sally Levine

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio, New 2021 Summer

ASTR 101 – Introduction to the Sun and Its Planets

This introductory astronomy course describes our solar system of planets and how astronomers develop our physical understanding about the universe. Topics include the properties of the Sun and planets; the formation of the solar system and how the planets have evolved over time; asteroids, comets, and dwarf planets; and a comparison of our solar system with new planetary systems being found around other stars. This course has no pre-requisites.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 10:30-12:00

Instructor: Jeffrey Kriessler

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Astronomy, New 2021 Summer

BIOL 112: Biology’s Survival Guide to College: How stress impacts a student’s ability to thrive

Stress can test the limit of an individual’s ability to maintain balance, thrive and survive. This non-majors biology course explores how cells, organs and organ systems work together to maintain homeostasis. Equipped with knowledge of how the body functions, students will explore how common stressors experienced by college students (sleep deprivation, lack of relaxation, poor diet, and others) can test the limits of maintaining homeostasis. Understanding the body’s stress response and how stress impacts well-being will enable students to make informed decisions about how to promote balance in their own life.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-asynchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - July 2, 2021

Session: 5 Week Session

Instructor: Rebecca Benard

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2021 Summer, Online

BIOL/HSTY 277: Pandemics, Past and Present: Integrative Approaches

This course is an interdisciplinary course to further student’s understanding of pandemics, by integrating different approaches to comprehend the impacts and challenges of civilizations dealing with major outbreaks of disease. This course is taught at an intermediate level that will be accessible to students from a breadth of academic focus. There are no explicit prerequisites, but the course instructors will review past coursework to ensure readiness for the course. Pandemics have impacted humans throughout history. Two current global pandemics are circulating; caused by the recurrent yearly influenza virus, and the novel SARS CoV-2. Throughout this course, students will gain perspective on how we study and view pandemics both historically and currently. The course integrates the significance, challenges and consequences of living in times where deep biological and epidemiological understanding of viruses and technological advances have become part of the tools humans need to live with modern pandemics, and predict future outbreaks. Each week of the course is taught by a different instructor, to cover 4 themes: the historical perspective, the spread of disease in populations, the life cycle/molecular biology of the influenza virus and SARS CoV-2, and the technology of testing, therapeutics and vaccinations.
Offered as BIOL 277 and HSTY 277.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:00-3:15

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty, Dianne Kube, Jonathan Sadowsky, Sarah Markt

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, History, Interdisciplinary, New 2021 Summer

CHST 398: Child Policy Externship

Externships offered through CHST 398/ANTH 308 give students an opportunity to work directly with professionals who design and implement policies that impact the lives of children and their families. Agencies involved are active in areas such as public health, including behavioral health, education. juvenile justice, childcare and/or child welfare. Students apply for the externships, and selected students are placed in local public or nonprofit agencies with a policy focus. Each student develops an individualized learning plan in consultation with the Childhood Studies Program faculty and the supervisor in the agency. CHST 398/ANTH 308 is a 3 credit-hour course and may be taken twice for a total of 6 credit hours.
Offered as CHST 398 and ANTH 308.

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Instructor: Gabriella Celeste

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2021 Summer

COGS 312/412: Second Language Acquisition I

This course is an introduction to the growing field of second language acquisition (SLA). SLA seeks to understand the linguistic, psychological and social processes that underlie the learning and use of second language(s). The goal of research is to identify the principles and processes that govern second language learning and use. SLA is approached from three perspectives in the course: 1) as linguistic knowledge;2) as a cognitive skill; and 3) as a socially and personality-meditated process. Important factors in second language learning will be identified and discussed. These include: age-related differences, the influence of the first language, the role played by innate (universal) principles, the role of memory processes, attitudes, motivation, personality and cognitive styles, and formal versus naturalistic learning contexts. The objective of this course is to survey the principal research in second language acquisition. Students will become familiar with the major research issues through their reading of both primary and secondary sources, as well as through lectures and class discussions.
Offered as COGS 312, COGS 412, LING 301 and LING 401.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MW 1:00-3:15

Instructor: Joseph Casal

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Cognitive Science, New 2021 Summer

CSDS 101: Introduction to Computer and Data Sciences

For students who want to explore the history, the current state, and future challenges of computer and data sciences. Topics include how computers work, computational thinking, how software development differs from traditional manufacturing, the Internet and World Wide Web, social networks, data collection, search engines and data mining, machine learning, trends in computer crime, security, and privacy, how technology is changing our laws and culture. The class includes a lab component where students will learn the Python programming language and other technologies and applications in order to further explore these topics. The recommended prerequisite is comfort with high school algebra.

Please reach out to the instructor of this course to confirm modality, or check the course list in SIS

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MR 9:00-11:50; TF 9:00-11:00

Instructor: Harold Connamacher

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Computer and Data Sciences, New 2021 Summer

CSDS 233: Introduction to Data Structures

Different representations of data: lists, stacks and queues, trees, graphs, and files. Manipulation of data: searching and sorting, hashing, recursion and higher order functions. Abstract data types, templating, and the separation of interface and implementation. Introduction to asymptotic analysis. The Java language is used to illustrate the concepts and as an implementation vehicle throughout the course.
Offered as CSDS 233 and ECSE 233.

Please reach out to the instructor of this course to confirm modality, or check the course list in SIS

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 9:30-12:25

Instructor: Erman Ayday

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Computer and Data Sciences, New 2021 Summer

CSDS 440: Machine Learning

Machine learning is a subfield of Artificial Intelligence that is concerned with the design and analysis of algorithms that “learn” and improve with experience, While the broad aim behind research in this area is to build systems that can simulate or even improve on certain aspects of human intelligence, algorithms developed in this area have become very useful in analyzing and predicting the behavior of complex systems. Machine learning algorithms have been used to guide diagnostic systems in medicine, recommend interesting products to customers in e-commerce, play games at human championship levels, and solve many other very complex problems. This course is focused on algorithms for machine learning: their design, analysis and implementation. We will study different learning settings, including supervised, semi-supervised and unsupervised learning. We will study different ways of representing the learning problem, using propositional, multiple-instance and relational representations. We will study the different algorithms that have been developed for these settings, such as decision trees, neural networks, support vector machines, k-means, harmonic functions and Bayesian methods. We will learn about the theoretical tradeoffs in the design of these algorithms, and how to evaluate their behavior in practice. At the end of the course, you should be able to:
–Recognize situations where machine learning algorithms are applicable;
–Understand, represent and formulate the learning problem;
–Apply the appropriate algorithm(s), or if necessary, design your own, with an understanding of the tradeoffs involved;
–Correctly evaluate the behavior of the algorithm when solving the problem.

Prereq: EECS 391 or EECS 491

 

Please reach out to the instructor of this course to confirm modality, or check the course list in SIS

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MW 10:00-12:15

Instructor: Soumya Ray

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Computer and Data Sciences, New 2021 Summer

DANC 122: Dance in Culture – Theatrical Forms

Introduction to an historical and cultural overview of many different theatrical forms of dance from various cultures specifically selected to encompass geographic diversity and represent different periods in history. Basic craft elements of the structures of theatrical dance will be introduced to provide a foundation for viewing dance and developing a personal aesthetic.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 10:30-12:00

Instructor: Danielle Dowler

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Dance, New 2021 Summer

ECON 313: Experiential Entrepreneurship

Experiential entrepreneurship places students in a startup (founded by the student or someone else) for a semester, while simultaneously teaching students key concepts for startup success in a classroom setting. Each session covers tools and concepts that every entrepreneur should understand, and students should be able to apply these tools and concepts to their host companies. Prereq: ECON 102.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered online. For more information, please reach out to the instructor.

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWRF 5:30-7:15

Instructor: Scott Shane

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Economics, New 2021 Summer

ECSE 233: Introduction to Data Structures

Different representations of data: lists, stacks and queues, trees, graphs, and files. Manipulation of data: searching and sorting, hashing, recursion and higher order functions. Abstract data types, templating, and the separation of interface and implementation. Introduction to asymptotic analysis. The Java language is used to illustrate the concepts and as an implementation vehicle throughout the course.
Offered as CSDS 233 and ECSE 233.

Please reach out to the instructor of this course to confirm modality, or check the course list in SIS

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 9:30-12:25

Instructor: Erman Ayday

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Computer and Data Sciences, New 2021 Summer

ECSE 281: Logic Design and Computer Organization

Fundamentals of digital systems in terms of both computer organization and logic level design. Organization of digital computers; information representation; boolean algebra; analysis and synthesis of combinational and sequential circuits; datapaths and register transfers; instruction sets and assembly language; input/output and communication; memory.
Offered as CSDS 281 and ECSE 281. Prereq: ENGR 131 or EECS 132.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor.

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TR 1:00-3:30; W 1:30-3:30 lab

Instructor: Evren Gurkan Cavusoglu

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, New 2021 Summer

ENGL 146: Tools, Not Rules: English Grammar for Writers

This course provides an introduction to English grammar in context for academic writers. It focuses on the study of language in use, including parts of speech, sentence grammar, paragraph structure, and text cohesion. This course is specifically designed for multilingual students, but native speakers of English may take the course with the approval of the instructor.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MW 9:00-11:15

Instructor: Ana Codita

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, New 2021 Summer

ENGL 147: Writing Across Disciplines

In this course, students will develop their genre knowledge and metacognitive skills to prepare for the advanced writing, reading, and research tasks required in upper-level writing and disciplinary courses across the university. Through individual and group inquiry, students will analyze and discuss the conventions of academic genres to understand the textual and linguistic features and disciplinary expectations of each form of writing. Then, students will apply these generic conventions through the production and revision of writing within each genre. Throughout the semester, students will engage in workshops and discussions that foster skills in the areas of seminar participation, collaboration, rhetorical awareness, and critical thinking. This course is specifically designed for non-native speakers of English, but native speakers may take the course with the approval of the instructor.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TR 9:00-11:15

Instructor: Mary Assad

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, New 2021 Summer

HSTY/ENGL 145: Utopia, Dystopia, and Scientific Modernity Sixteenth-Century to the Present

A utopia is a dream of a better world; a dystopia is a nightmare of a worse one. Both are fantasies. Yet both respond to the very real technological, political and cultural conditions in which they are written. This multidisciplinary course uses utopian and dystopian literature from the sixteenth century to the present to investigate the rise of scientific modernity and the responses it provoked. Starting with Thomas More’s Utopia, and ending with Octavia Butler’s The Parable of the Sower and a contemporary film, students will read important utopian and dystopian works of fiction and connect them to themes that run through the history of science: the relationship between knowledge and power; the impact of new technologies; voyages of exploration and exploitation; industrialization and forms of production; ideas of gender, race, and class; nuclear power; genetics; and climate change. We encourage students to ask what led to these specific critiques or ideas, and why? What limits or determines the boundaries of the possible or the desirable to each author? And how might these still be relevant today?
Offered as ENGL 145 and HSTY 145.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 14 - July 26, 2021

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MWR 10:30-12:30

Instructor: Aviva Rothman & Magdalena Vinter

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, History, Interdisciplinary, New 2021 Summer

ITAL 370: Special Topics in Italian Literature: Italian Regions Top to Toe

Special topics in Italian literature, literary criticism, and culture. Prereq: ITAL 202 or equivalent.

 

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: May 21 - June 11, 2021

Session: May Session

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Denise Caterinacci

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2021 Summer

JAPN 306: Extensive Reading through Manga

This course aims to enhance students, Reading skills in Japanese as well as skills in the rest of the four main areas of language learning (speaking, listening, and writing) through the use of the extensive reading (a.k.a. Graded reading) method with manga in Japanese.

In this course, the emphasis is put on acquiring the skill to enjoy reading content without translation. Students will review and learn Japanese structures and expressions, and have the opportunity to explore colloquialisms, speech styles, onomatopoeia, contractions, interjections, and other elements of speech. The class also will incorporate individual reading activities such as oral reading sessions, timed reading, speed reading and book discussion groups. We will also explore how Japanese scripts such Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji as well as Roman alphabets are integrated in manga. Our primary textbooks will be manga in Japanese; however, some additional readings in English will be given to students as a point of reference for the course lectures. The classes will primarily be conducted in Japanese. Prereq: JAPN 202 with a C or higher.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:00-3:20

Instructor: Yukiko Nishida

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2021 Summer

LATN 101: Elementary Latin I

An introduction to the elements of Latin: pronunciation, forms, syntax, vocabulary, and reading.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Instructor: Paul Hay

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Classics, New 2021 Summer

LING 301/401: Second Language Acquisition I

This course is an introduction to the growing field of second language acquisition (SLA). SLA seeks to understand the linguistic, psychological and social processes that underlie the learning and use of second language(s). The goal of research is to identify the principles and processes that govern second language learning and use. SLA is approached from three perspectives in the course: 1) as linguistic knowledge;2) as a cognitive skill; and 3) as a socially and personality-meditated process. Important factors in second language learning will be identified and discussed. These include: age-related differences, the influence of the first language, the role played by innate (universal) principles, the role of memory processes, attitudes, motivation, personality and cognitive styles, and formal versus naturalistic learning contexts. The objective of this course is to survey the principal research in second language acquisition. Students will become familiar with the major research issues through their reading of both primary and secondary sources, as well as through lectures and class discussions.
Offered as COGS 312, COGS 412, LING 301 and LING 401.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MW 1:00-3:15

Instructor: Joseph Casal

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Cognitive Science, New 2021 Summer

ORBH 251: Leading Organizations (LEAD II)

The principal goal of this course is to help students enhance their leadership skills by understanding how organizations function through the lenses of structure, culture, and power/politics. The course enables students to discern how leaders function effectively as they integrate goals, resources and people within these constraints. Students learn about these organizational lenses while developing their own leadership and professional skills. Prereq: ORBH 250 or ORBH 396 and at least Sophomore standing.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered online. For more information, please reach out to the instructor.

Dates: June 14 - July 26, 2021

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MW 1:00-4:00

Instructor: Karlygash Assylkhan

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, Organizational Behavior

PHYS/PHIL 261: Our Knowledge of Climate Change: What do we know and how do we know it?

Traditional theories of knowledge have concentrated on the actions and beliefs of individuals, and how they marshal evidence from the world to support or refute their scientific hypotheses. This traditional epistemological framework has been challenged by the developments of the modern era of Big Science, resulting in the development of new approaches to a social epistemology of science. Reflective of how science is done, this epistemological framework in turn can provide guidance for the robust prosecution of the scientific enterprise. Perhaps nowhere is this more important than in climate science, where on the one hand the underlying dynamics of climate change pose an existential threat to our civilization, and on the other, there are active and well organized efforts to derail the scientific process and to denigrate the scientists.

This course will first develop classical notions of the epistemology of science, including the role of models and issues of uncertainty (statistical, systematic, and gross) as well as the challenges of developing a robust scientific process resistant to fraud. These issues will be illustrated by consideration of various classical experiments. The course will then expand the epistemological framework to the collaborative context of modern big science, illustrating the issues by examples from the field of high energy physics (which saw the development of the World Wide Web by CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, to allow physicists from around the world to share and collectively analyze data). With this in hand the course will explore the history and current state of climate science in the framework of a social epistemology of big science. Students will develop a good understanding of the role of hierarchical models of climate science, the empirical basis for our current understanding of anthropogenic climate change, the role and development of international coordination of climate science and its implications for policy, and the challenges posed by hostile, well-organized efforts to disrupt the scientific process, the public understanding of the science, and ultimately the processes necessary for addressing the challenges of climate change.

Offered as PHIL 261 and PHYS 261.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWR 1:30-3:45

Instructor: Cyrus Taylor & Chris Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Interdisciplinary, New 2021 Summer, Philosophy, Physics

PSCL 385: Science of Emotion and Aging

In this course we will examine the multi-faceted nature of emotion with an emphasis on the development of emotion in adulthood. We will consider the history, theories, and most recent research and thinking in the science of emotion and aging. We will also be considering how we know what we know about emotions. So, one goal will be to increase our awareness of the assumptions underlying theorists¿ claims, researchers¿ findings, and our own belief structures. We will also work to strengthen our general thinking and communicative abilities as we study the psychology of emotion. Specifically, our goals will be to state theories and ideas clearly and concisely, to identify different parts of arguments and analyze the logic of these parts, to integrate the different aspects of emotion, and to generate new ideas based on the theories and research. My shorthand terms for these processes are: “summarizing”, “analyzing”, “integrating”, and “generating”.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-asynchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - July 2, 2021

Session: 5 Week Session

Instructor: Jennifer Ramsey

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, Psychological Sciences

RLGN 101: Religion and Culture

This course introduces students to the study of religion by examining religious practices within a variety of cultural and historical contexts around the world. The course invites students to think comparatively and critically about the role of religion within broader cultural discourses (e.g., gender, politics, and the environment).

Instead of surveying what were formerly called the “world’s great religions,” this course builds religious literacy by examining religious practices within particular geographical and thematic areas. Through comparative case studies drawn from a diverse range of “non-western” cultures, students will learn about religions and spiritualities across the globe. These cultural touchstones will build core literacy in other cultures, positioning students to engage more fully in the religious and cultural diversity that they will encounter in their own lives and careers.

Alongside these geographic case studies, the course will also examine key themes in the study of religion, such as diasporic transnationalism, liberation theology, and ritual practice. We will use these themes to tease out and debate some of the core theoretical and methodological challenges in the study of religion, including postcolonial critiques of the origin and history of the field of religious studies itself.

To be clear, religion is our subject, not our approach. Although students will find opportunities to reflect on their own spirituality/disbelief, the course does not presume any particular religious or non-religious perspective. Indeed, the study of religion is itself concerned not only with the world’s religious traditions, but also with contemporary questions of skepticism, science, disbelief, and secularity.
Evaluation will be based on class preparation and participation, regular short papers, a midterm exam, and a final take-home essay exam.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 9:30-12:25

Instructor: Brian Clites

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, Religious Studies

RUSN 101: Elementary Russian I

Introductory course emphasizing conversational skills. Students achieve control of alphabet, sound system, and basic sentence structures in spoken and written Russian. Students must use the course material offered by the Online Language Learning Center in addition to class meetings.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWRF 10:30-12:15

Instructor: Tatiana Zilotina

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2021 Summer

RUSN 102: Elementary Russian II

Continuation of RUSN 101, emphasizing audiolingual practice. Recommended preparation: RUSN 101.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWRF 10:30-12:15

Instructor: Tatiana Zilotina

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2021 Summer

SOCI 202: Race and Ethnic Minorities in The United States

This is a survey course that looks at the relations between racial and ethnic relations in the United States from an historical and contemporary perspective. This course will look at relations between: European colonists and native Americans; whites and blacks during the period of slavery, Jim Crow, the civil rights era and contemporary period; immigrants at the turn of the 20th and 21st century; Mexicans and Puerto Ricans; and the pan-ethnic groups such as Latinos, Asian Americans, and Arab Americans. We examine the origins of racial/ethnic hierarchies, the social construction of identities, and stratification of racial and ethnic groups. This course will take a macro perspective that examines larger structural forces (e.g., colonization, industrialization, and immigration) to explain inter-group relations, and a constructionist perspective to understand how power manufactures and maintains the social meaning of identities (looking at stereotypes and hegemonic discourse). Students who have received credit for SOCI 302 may not receive credit for SOCI 202.
Offered as AFST 202 and SOCI 202.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 10:00-12:15

Instructor: Donald Hutcherson

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, Sociology

SOCI 203: Human Development: Medical and Social

Social influences on health and illness across the lifespan. Social determinants of health and health behavior, and delivery of health care. Guest lecturers from the medical school and other health care providers address professional practice issues across the lifespan. Issues include: new approaches to birthing; adolescent substance abuse: myths and realities of AIDS; risk factors of diseases in middle age; menopause, cognition and aging-Alzheimer’s disease; problems in care of elderly; medical ethic of death and dying.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: May 21 - June 11, 2021

Session: May Session

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Polina Ermoshkina

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, Sociology

SPAN 101: Elementary Spanish I

Introductory course. Students achieve control of the sound system and basic sentence structures of spoken and written Spanish. Students must use the course material offered by the Online Language Learning Center in addition to class meetings.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - June 28, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MWF 12:00-2:55

Instructor: Elena Fernandez

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2021 Summer

SPAN 102: Elementary Spanish II

Continuation of SPAN 101, emphasizing conversational skills. Recommended preparation: SPAN 101.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 12:00-2:55

Instructor: Elena Fernandez

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2021 Summer

THTR 110: Introduction to Theater

THTR 110 is a fundamental study of theatre from the standpoint of developing the critical acumen of a potential audience. It covers each ingredient of the theatrical experience–audience, playwriting, acting, directing, theatre architecture, design and technology–and attempts to help students define a reasonable set of standards to judge that part of the experience as an audience member and to clearly communicate their feelings and thoughts regarding that experience. The primary textbook is Edward Wilson’s The Theatre Experience, former theatre critic for The Wall Street Journal. Readings in this text are augmented by the reading of specific plays that represent different periods, genres, conventions, and dramatic styles. Representative plays (typically six each semester) include Oedipus Rex (Sophocles), Hamlet (Shakespeare), Tartuffe (Molliere), Uncle Vanya (Chekhov), Waiting for Godot (Beckett), and Angels in America (Kushner). Many of these plays are supplemented by short films prepared by Films for the Humanities so that students can see examples of various dramatic and theatrical styles in performance. In addition to class discussions, lectures, and readings, students are also required to attend two live theatre productions offered by Case Western Reserve University’s Department of Theater each semester. The students write critical essays about their experience as an audience member in relation to a particular aspect of the performance. Students also have an opportunity to complete in-class projects in which they gain experience functioning as a theatre practitioner. These projects and the accompanying written assignment are designed to increase the student’s understanding of the function and interdependence of various theatre artists.

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: July 6 - August 2, 2021

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWRF 11:00-12:00

Instructor: Jeffrey Ullom

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, Online, Theater

THTR 207: Our Heroes, Ourselves: Superheroes and Popular Culture

Since the beginning of cinema, audiences have flocked to see larger-than-life superheroes conquer the unconquerable while also teaching us about ourselves and confirming (or challenging) our world view. Beginning with cinematic serials in the 1920s and continuing to the recent Marvel production machine, these films not only depict a hero’s efforts to save the world from disaster again and again, but also trace the development of our popular culture. Issues of violence, nationalism, the presentation and treatment of women, racial stereotypes, and spectacle among other topics can be discussed after viewing each film, providing an opportunity to explore the changing expectations of American audiences and the developing form of contemporary cinema.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: May 21 - June 11, 2021

Session: May Session

Time: MTWRF 11:00-12:00

Instructor: Jeffrey Ullom

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, Theater

USSO 289J: Treasure or Trash: Examining Theatrical Credibility

This seminar is a fundamental study of theatre from the standpoint of developing the critical acumen of a potential audience. It covers each ingredient of the theatrical experience-audience, playwriting, acting, directing, theatre architecture, design and technology-and attempts to help students define a reasonable set of standards to judge that part of the experience as an audience member and to clearly communicate their feelings and thoughts regarding that experience.

In addition to class discussions, lectures, and readings, students are also required to attend four live performances-two theater productions offered by Case Western Reserve University’s Department of Theater and two productions at the Cleveland Play House. The students will write critical essays about their experience as an audience member in relation to a particular aspect of the performance.

 

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 9:00-10:30

Instructor: Jeffrey Ullom

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, SAGES

USSO 292V: Mapping Music Through the Digital Humanities: A Cleveland Atlas

For all its celebrated preoccupation with rock, Cleveland is home to a wide variety of musical genres: jazz, blues, classical, polka, hip hop, gospel, among many others. Cleveland is also a home on the move, a city of immigration and outmigration, a city of waterways, bridges and commuter rails. Then again, Cleveland is a city of enclaves, borders and barricades, social distance despite geographic nearness. In this seminar, we will ask a fundamental question: is music like a bridge that connects different people in the city or is it a border that structures divisions? To answer this question, we will put digital mapping tools to use in better understanding the musical patterns that shape city life over time. We will examine the links between dominant and subcultural music; analyze music’s relationship to socio-economic forces such as segregation, urban decline, suburban flight, and revitalization; and reflect on how music defines Cleveland’s place in the national imagination. In the process, students will contribute to a digital atlas of Cleveland’s shifting musical soundscape. Music, at once rooted in identity and as rootless as radio waves, presents an alternate lens for understanding the routes and rifts shaping urban life.

 

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWR 4:00-5:30

Instructor: George Blake

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, SAGES

USSO 293E: Gender and War in the U.S.

Major wars disrupt and permanently alter power relations and social systems. This seminar looks specifically at the American Revolution, Civil War, and World War II to examine how gender ideologies and signifiers (and points of intersection with race, ethnicity, and class) were experienced, perpetuated, reconfigured and remembered.
Students will discuss historical articles that analyze the norms of gender dynamics and how they change over the course of war alongside primary materials by Americans experiencing those norms and changes. We will also analyze two feature films and one documentary to examine how Americans use cultural expression to grapple with gender changes wrought by war.

 

This course has been canceled for Summer 2021. 

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 10:00-11:30

Instructor: Renee Sentilles

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, SAGES

USSY 292N: Cli-Fi: Addressing Climate Change in Fact, Fiction, and Film

This seminar examines the emerging literary genre of Cli-Fi, or climate fiction, which bridges genres such as science fiction and apocalyptic literature as it depicts imagined responses to the damage wrought by global climate change. In the early 1960s, well in advance of compelling scientific evidence of anthropogenic climate change, novelists were already speculating about the effects of global warming. Focusing on fiction, films, and non-fiction writing from the past three decades, we will consider how authors envision the effects of climate change. Specifically, we will read works by historians, journalists, philosophers, scientists, and cultural critics as a foundation for our analysis of several works of fiction. Further, we will consider how visual media, like feature and documentary films, depict the impacts of climate change. Centrally, we will evaluate how climate fiction complements existing popular and academic conversations about our transforming world. Ultimately, responding to the broadening field of narratives about human-generated transformations of the world, we will address climate fiction’s potential to influence ethical paths shaped by those who seek to alter the disastrous trajectory that the genre imagines.

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTR 4:00-5:30

Instructor: Matt Burkhart

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, SAGES

USSY 294Y: Language of the Suffering Body

“Pounding headache.” “Burning fever.” “Pins and needles.” Such phrases rely on figurative or metaphorical language to convey pain or general not-right-ness in the body. But they are also clichés, or overused metaphors that over time have become worn out and meaningless. What happens when people lack the language to communicate to others what is happening in their bodies? How do they begin to find the words to express what they feel?
In this seminar, we will explore the relationship between language and pain, and the extent to which words have (or lack) the capacity to give meaningful expression to bodily pain experienced. To do this, we will closely read how literary works from a variety of genres use language in new, striking, and even baffling ways. Our analysis will be guided by theoretical and philosophical texts about pain and bodily sensation, as well as linguistics and metaphor. In making this investigation, students will be invited to research and formulate their own claims about how the language of literature gives–or does not give–meaningful expression to bodily pain.

 

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 12:00-1:30

Instructor: Camila Ring

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, SAGES

USSY 294Z: The American Musical on Film

While the musical represents a quintessentially American art form, it is film that has amplified and popularized it around the world, entertaining audiences as well as inspiring performers, writers and composers to put their own stamp on the form.

From the very beginning of “talking pictures,” the American musical has enthralled its audience and became the ultimate form to articulate what the “dream factories” represented. The film musical allowed moviegoers to step out of a world of realism as characters danced and sang their way through experiences that were too large to remain earthbound. At the same time, the musical not only provided escapist entertainment: song and dance revealed character, furthering the story and were not merely seen as an “interruption” or “divertissement”. Serious subject matters could be tackled and the popularity of musical films were central to the financial survival of Hollywood during the Great Depression.

While the popularity of the film musical has seen highs and lows, the form remains durable. It’s influence makes it an essential component in the study of film. This seminar will cover a range of film musicals from from the dawn of the sound era to the present day. We will encounter them not only as works of art or popular entertainment but as time capsules that help us to understand the issues of the time. All films will be ones that are easily accessible to the class and the expectation is that the assigned movies will be viewed outside of class time unless we are looking at specific excerpts. Discussion will be central to this class as we share our observation and critical evaluations of these films with respect to performance, art direction, music, direction and themes.

 

For summer 2021, this course will be offered remote-synchronous. For more information, please reach out to the instructor. 

Dates: June 1 - July 27, 2021

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 1:00-2:30

Instructor: Donald Carrier

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2021 Summer, SAGES

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