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ANTH 314/414: Cultures of the United States

This course considers the rich ethnic diversity of the U.S. from the perspective of social/cultural anthropology. Conquest, immigration, problems of conflicts and accommodation, and the character of the diverse regional and ethnic cultures are considered as are forms of racism, discrimination, and their consequences. Groups of interest include various Latina/o and Native peoples, African-American groups, and specific ethnic groups of Pacific, Mediterranean, European, Asian, and Caribbean origin. Offered as ANTH 314, ETHS 314, and ANTH 414.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWTh 9:30a-12:30p

Instructor: Atwood Gaines

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ARTH 241: Medieval Art

This course will introduce students to the pivotal works of art created between approximately 250 and 1500. We will discuss painting, sculpture, architecture, manuscript illumination, and graphic arts. Medieval visual and material culture will be considered within the framework of socio-political developments, rapid urban growth, the flowering of monastic culture, the rise of universities, and changes in devotional practices. While the course will primarily focus on western part of the medieval Christendom, we will also discuss Jewish, Byzantine, and Islamic art. Visits to the CMA will form an integral part of the course. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 10:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Aimee Caya

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, New 2017 Summer

ARTS 220: Photography Studio I

Camera, film, and darkroom techniques. Development of basic black and white perceptual and photographic skills. Darkroom and photographic field and lab work. 35mm camera required.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuTh 6:00-9:00 p.m.

Instructor: Alexander Aitken

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Art Studio

ARTS 286: Introduction to Video Games

Game design creates meaningful play through interactive experiences. This introductory studio based course, explores games through the development and creation of 2D video games. The course aims to provide a critical vocabulary and historical context for analyzing games and gaming theory and focuses on the skills and techniques necessary to develop 2D video games.

Dates: June 19-July 31, 2017

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MW 4:00-7:00p

Instructor: Jared Bendis

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art Studio, New 2017 Summer

ARTS 305/405: Study Abroad: Architecture, Design & Culture (New Zealand)

This 3-week intensive Wellington, New Zealand summer course immerses students into a culture that solves architectural problems through a sophisticated appreciation for design, aesthetics and conceptualization. The program introduces students to critical inquiry through shared principles and theories of art, architecture and design, as experienced in New Zealand’s cultural capital. Using the city as our classroom, students will visit well-known sites, museums and monuments as well as hidden gems that reinforce concepts presented in readings, lectures and class discussions.

For more information, please visit the course website

View course flyer

 

Dates: July 10-30, 2017

Time: Course meets in Wellington, New Zealand

Instructor: Sally Levine

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art Studio, New 2017 Summer, Study Abroad

ARTS 399: Independent Study in Art Studio

Independent Study in Art Studio; by permit of Director only. Contact Tim Shuckerow.

Class meets at Squire Valleevue Farm, lower farm.

Dates: June 5-June 30, 2017

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTuWThF 10:30a-3:00p

Instructor: Tim Shuckerow

Credits: 1-3 credits

Department: Art Studio

ARTS 497: Summer Workshop in Art Education

A current art education issue is covered in depth.

Class meets at Squire Valleevue Farm, lower farm.

Dates: June 5-June 30, 2017

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTuWThF 10:30a-3:00p

Instructor: Tim Shuckerow

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Art Studio

ASTR 201: The Sun and Its Planets

An overview of the solar system; the planets and other objects that orbit about the Sun and the Sun itself as the dominant mass and the most important source of energy in the solar system. Concepts and the development of our knowledge will be emphasized. Not available for credit to astronomy majors.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 10:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Jeffrey Kriessler

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Astronomy

BIOL 114: Principles of Biology

A one-semester course in biology designed for the non-major. A primary objective of this course is to demonstrate how biological principles impact an individual’s daily life. BIOL 114 introduces students to the molecules of life, cell structure and function, respiration and photosynthesis, molecular genetics, heredity and human genetics, evolution, diversity of life, and ecology. Minimal background is required; however, some exposure to biology and chemistry at the high school level is helpful. This course is not open to students with credit for BIOL 214 or BIOL 250. This course does not count toward any Biology degree.

THIS COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELLED FOR 2017.

 

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 214: Genes, Evolution and Ecology

First in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on DNA and RNA); mitotic and meiotic cell cycles, gene expression, genetics, population genetics, evolution, biological diversity and ecology. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 111.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 214L: Genes, Evolution and Ecology Laboratory

First in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (with a focus on DNA and RNA); basics of cell structure (with a focus on malaria research); molecular genetics, biotechnology; population genetics and evolution, ecology. Assignments will be in the form of a scientific journal submission. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 214.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: TuTh 1:00-4:00p; MW 1:00-2:00p

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 215: Cells and Proteins

Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on membranes, energy conversion organelles and cytoskeleton); protein structure-function; enzyme kinetics, cellular energetics, and cell communication and motility strategies. Prereq: BIOL 214 and (CHEM 105 or CHEM 111). Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 106 or ENGR 145.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Valerie Haywood

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 215: Cells and Proteins

Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on membranes, energy conversion organelles and cytoskeleton); protein structure-function; enzyme kinetics, cellular energetics, and cell communication and motility strategies. Prereq: BIOL 214 and (CHEM 105 or CHEM 111). Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 106 or ENGR 145.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 10:00-11:45 a.m.

Instructor: Dianne Kube

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 215L: Cells and Proteins Laboratory

Second in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics to include: protein structure-function, enzymes kinetics; cell structure; cellular energetics, respiration and photosynthesis. In addition, membrane structure and transport will be covered. Laboratory and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. This course is not available for students who have taken BIOL 215 as a 4-credit course. Prereq: BIOL 214L and Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 215.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MW 1:00-2:00p; TTh 1:00-4:00p

Instructor: Deborah Harris

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 216: Development and Physiology

This is the final class in the series of three courses required of the Biology major. As with the two previous courses, BIOL 214 and 215, this course is designed to provide an overview of fundamental biological processes. It will examine the complexity of interactions controlling reproduction, development and physiological function in animals. The Developmental Biology section will review topics such as gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, the genetic control of development, stem cells and cloning. Main topics included in the Physiology portion consist of: homeostasis, the function of neurons and nervous systems; the major organ systems and processes involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, temperature regulation, endocrine function and the immunologic response.  Prereq: BIOL 214.

 

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:00-11:30a

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 216: Development and Physiology (Hybrid)

This is the final class in the series of three courses required of the Biology major. As with the two previous courses, BIOL 214 and 215, this course is designed to provide an overview of fundamental biological processes. It will examine the complexity of interactions controlling reproduction, development and physiological function in animals. The Developmental Biology section will review topics such as gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, the genetic control of development, stem cells and cloning. Main topics included in the Physiology portion consist of: homeostasis, the function of neurons and nervous systems; the major organ systems and processes involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, temperature regulation, endocrine function and the immunologic response. There are two instructional modes for this course: lecture mode and hybrid mode. In the lecture mode students attend class for their instruction. In the hybrid mode students watch online lectures from the course instructor and attend discussion sections with the course instructor. The online content prepares students for the discussions.  The total student effort and course content is identical for both instructional modes. Either instructional mode fulfills the BIOL 216 requirement for the BA and BS in Biology. Prereq: BIOL 214.

*This section of BIOL 216 will be taught in the hybrid model. Due to the accelerated nature of the 5-week summer term, students are required to attend class every day (M-Th).*

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 10:00-11:45a

Instructor: Rebecca Benard

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 216L: Development and Physiology Laboratory

Third in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Students will conduct laboratory experiments designed to provide hands-on, empirical laboratory experience in order to better understand the complex interactions governing the basic physiology and development of organisms. Laboratories and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. Prereq: BIOL 214L. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 216.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: TuTh 12:30-3:30p, MW 12:30-1:30p

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 302: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does the human brain learn?” Through assigned readings, extensive class discussions, and a major paper, each student will explore personal perspectives on learning. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: the brain’s cycle of learning; neocortex structure and function; emotion and limbic brain; synapse dynamics and changes in learning; images in cognition; symbolic brain (language, mathematics, music); memory formation; and creative thought and brain mechanisms. The major paper will be added to each student’s SAGES writing portfolio. In addition, near the end of the semester, each student will make an oral presentation on a chosen topic. Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 9:00-11:30a

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 333: Human Microbiome

This departmental seminar is designed to reveal how the abundant community of human-associated microorganisms influence human development, physiology, immunity and nutrition. Using a survey of current literature, this discussion-based course will emphasize an understanding of the complexity and dynamics of human/microbiome interactions and the influence of environment, genetics and individual life histories on the microbiome and human health. Grades will be based on participation, written assignments, exams, an oral presentation and a final paper. Prerequisites are completion of BIOL 214 and BIOL 216. This class is offered as a SAGES Departmental Seminar and fulfills an Organismal breadth requirement of the BA and BS in Biology. Currently the class is not open to graduate students. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Prereq: BIOL 214 and BIOL 216.

Dates: July 10-August 4, 2017

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 10:30a-12:45p

Instructor: Dianne Kube

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 336/436: Aquatic Biology

Physical, chemical, and biological dynamics of lake ecosystems. Factors governing the distribution, abundance, and diversity of freshwater organisms. Offered as BIOL 336 and BIOL 436. Prereq: BIOL 214 or BIOL 251. Physical, chemical, and biological dynamics of lake ecosystems. Factors governing the distribution, abundance, and diversity of freshwater organisms. Offered as BIOL 336 and BIOL 436. Prereq: BIOL 214 or BIOL 251.

 

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 12:15-2:00p

Instructor: Deborah Harris

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 339: Aquatic Biology Laboratory

The physical, chemical, and biological limnology of freshwater ecosystems will be investigated. Emphasis will be on identification of the organisms inhabiting these systems and their ecological interactions with each other. This course will combine both field and laboratory analysis to characterize and compare the major components of these ponds. Students will have the opportunity to design and conduct individual projects. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 336.

Held at Squire Valleevue Farm.  Transportation will be provided.  Allow one half-hour of travel each way.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: TuTh 3:00-6:00p

Instructor: Deborah Harris

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 343/443: Microbiology

The physiology, genetics, biochemistry, and diversity of microorganisms. The subject will be approached both as a basic biological science that studies the molecular and biochemical processes of cells and viruses, and as an applied science that examines the involvement of microorganisms in human disease as well as in workings of ecosystems, plant symbioses, and industrial processes. The course is divided into four major areas: bacteria, viruses, medical microbiology, and environmental and applied microbiology. Offered as BIOL 343 and BIOL 443. Prereq: BIOL 215 or BIOL 250.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 1:00-2:45p

Instructor: Dianne Kube

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 346: Human Anatomy

Gross anatomy of the human body. Two lectures and one laboratory demonstration per week. Prereq: BIOL 216 or BIOL 251.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Ronald Oldfield

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2017 Summer

CHEM 105: Principles of Chemistry I

Atomic structure; thermochemistry; periodicity, bonding and molecular structure; intermolecular forces; properties of solids; liquids, gases and solutions. Recommended preparation: One year of high school chemistry.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 10:30a-12:20p

Instructor: Drew Meyer

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 106: Principles of Chemistry II

Thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium; acid/base chemistry; oxidation and reduction; kinetics; spectroscopy; introduction to nuclear, organic, inorganic, and polymer chemistry. Prereq: CHEM 105 or equivalent.

Dates: July 10-August 4, 2017

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 10:30a-12:40p

Instructor: Drew Meyer

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 113: Principles of Chemistry Laboratory

A one semester laboratory based on quantitative chemical measurements. Experiments include analysis, synthesis and characterization, thermochemistry and chemical kinetics. Computer analysis of data is a key part of all experiments. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or ENGR 145. A one semester laboratory based on quantitative chemical measurements. Experiments include analysis, synthesis and characterization, thermochemistry and chemical kinetics. Computer analysis of data is a key part of all experiments. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or ENGR 145.

Dates: July 10-August 4, 2017

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 1:00-5:00 p.m.

Instructor: Gregory Tochtrop

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 223: Introductory Organic Chemistry I

Introductory course for science majors and engineering students. Develops themes of structure and bonding along with elementary reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers as well as an introduction to spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWThF 10:30a-12:20p

Instructor: Raul E. Juarez Hernandez

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 224: Introductory Organic Chemistry II

Continues and extends themes of structure and bonding from CHEM 223 and continues spectroscopy and more complex reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of aromatic rings, carbonyl compounds, amines, and selected special topics. Prereq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

Dates: July 10-August 4, 2017

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWThF 10:30a-12:20p

Instructor: Raul E. Juarez Hernandez

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 233: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 and CHEM 113 or equivalent. Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323. An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 and CHEM 113 or equivalent. Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 1:30-4:30p

Instructor: Kenneth Adair

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 234: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

A continuation of CHEM 233, involving multi-step organic synthesis, peptide synthesis, product purification and analysis using sophisticated analytical techniques such as chromatography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 233. Coreq: CHEM 224

Dates: July 10-August 4, 2017

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 1:30-4:30p

Instructor: Rajesh Viswanathan

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 328/428: Introductory Biochemistry

A survey of biochemistry with a strong emphasis on the chemical logic underlying metabolic pathways and the evolution of biomolecules. Cellular architecture. Amino acids and protein structure, purification, analysis, and synthesis. DNA, RNA, the flow of genetic information, and molecular biological technology. Enzyme kinetics, catalytic, and regulatory strategies. Sugars, complex carbohydrates, and glycoproteins. Lipids and cell membranes. Glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, carbon fixation through the “dark reactions” of photosynthesis, aerobic catabolism through the citric acid cycle, and glycogen metabolism. Biosynthesis and degradation of fatty acids, amino acids, and proteins. Offered as CHEM 328 and CHEM 428. Prereq: CHEM 224 or CHEM 324.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 10:30a-12:20p

Instructor: Rekha Srinivasan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CLSC 318/418: Archaeological & Epigraphical Field School (Greece)

This interdisciplinary course takes place in situ in the Mediterranean and will be attached to an active archaeological project. Students will learn the methodological principles of archaeological and epigraphical fieldwork by participating in activities such as surveying, excavation, museum work, geophysical survey, artifact analysis, and other scientific techniques. In addition to work in the field and museum, students will receive an introduction to the history Greco-Roman culture through visits to major archaeological sites in the region. Examples of active archaeological projects may vary, depending on the year. Offered as CLSC 318 and CLSC 418.

Dates: June 11-July 7, 2017

Time: Course meets in Corinth, Greece

Instructor: Paul Iversen

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Classics, New 2017 Summer, Study Abroad

COGS 322: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does the human brain learn?” Through assigned readings, extensive class discussions, and a major paper, each student will explore personal perspectives on learning. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: the brain’s cycle of learning; neocortex structure and function; emotion and limbic brain; synapse dynamics and changes in learning; images in cognition; symbolic brain (language, mathematics, music); memory formation; and creative thought and brain mechanisms. The major paper will be added to each student’s SAGES writing portfolio. In addition, near the end of the semester, each student will make an oral presentation on a chosen topic. Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 9:00-11:30a

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Cognitive Science

COSI 431: Medical Aspects of Developmental Disabilities: Theory and Practice

The practicum provides structured training activities to help the student become proficient in birth to three assessment and intervention and infant and toddler development. This intensive training experience will provide skills that students need when working in early intervention settings. Guided observation of children and developmental domains, parent-child interaction, and family based assessment will be included.

Dates: June 19-July 31, 2017

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 9:00a-12:00p

Instructor: Kathryn McNeal

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

COSI 452B: Graduate Clinical Practicum II: Professional Issues

COSI 452B Addresses professional issues in speech-language pathology including case management, managed health care, ethics and interviewing. Four to ten hours of clinic contact per week at the Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center. (Maximum of 2 credits.) Recommended preparation: COSI 352, COSI 413, COSI 452A, and COSI 453.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TBD

Instructor: Jean Nisenboum

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Psychological Sciences

COSI 452C. Graduate Clinical Practicum III: Special Populations

Addresses professional issues in speech-language pathology including case management, special clinical populations, collaborating with other professionals, teaming, leadership, and use of technology. Fifteen to thirty hours of clinic contact per week at area skilled nursing facilities, hospitals, rehab centers, early intervention centers, centers for developmentally disabled, private practices, etc. (Maximum of 2 credits.) Recommended preparation: COSI 352, COSI 452A, COSI 452B, COSI 453, and COSI 456.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TBD

Instructor: Jean Nisenboum

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Psychological Sciences

COSI 452E: Graduate Clinical Practicum V: Medical Speech Pathology

Addresses professional issues in speech-language pathology including case management, special clinical populations, collaborating with other professionals, documentation, managed health care, and use of technology. Fifteen to thirty hours of clinic contact per week at area skilled nursing facilities, hospitals. (Maximum of 2 credits.) Recommended preparation: COSI 352, COSI 452A, COSI 452B, COSI 452C, COSI 453, and COSI 456.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TBD

Instructor: Jean Nisenboum

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Psychological Sciences

EBME 370: Principles of Biomedical Engineering Design

Students learn and implement the design process to produce working prototypes of medical devices with potential commercial value to meet significant clinical needs. Critical examination of contemporary medical problems is used to develop a specific problem statement. The class is divided into teams of 3 to 4 students. Each team integrates their knowledge and skills to design a device to meet their clinical need. Project planning and management, including resource allocation, milestones, and documentation, are required to ensure successful completion of projects within the allotted time and budget. Formal design reviews by a panel of advisors and outside medical device experts are required every four weeks. Every student is required to give oral presentations at each formal review and is responsible for formal documentation of the design process, resulting in an executive summary and complete design history file of the project. The course culminates with a public presentation of the team’s device to a panel of experts. This course is expected to provide the student with a real-world, capstone design experience. Recommended preparation: EBME 310

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Colin Drummond

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Biomedical Engineering

ECHE 362D: Chemical Engineering Laboratory in Denmark

Chemical Engineering Laboratory in Denmark. A version of ECHE 362 taught during the summer at Technical University of Denmark (DTU) in Lyngby, Denmark. Prereq: ECHE 260 and ECHE 360 and ECHE 361 and ECHE 363 and ECHE 364.

View course flyer

Dates: June 30-July 28, 2017

Time: Course meets in Lyngby, Denmark

Instructor: Mohan Sankaran

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Chemical Engineering, Study Abroad

EECS 233: Introduction to Data Structures

The programming language Java; pointers, files, and recursion. Representation and manipulation of data: one way and circular linked lists, doubly linked lists; the available space list. Different representations of stacks and queues. Representation of binary trees, trees and graphs. Hashing; searching and sorting.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuW 9:30-11:30am

Instructor: Richard Kolacinski

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS 246: Signals and Systems

Mathematical representation, characterization, and analysis of continuous-time signals and systems. Development of elementary mathematical models of continuous-time dynamic systems. Time domain and frequency domain analysis of linear time-invariant systems. Fourier series, Fourier transforms, and Laplace transforms. Sampling theorem. Filter design. Introduction to feedback control systems and feedback controller design. Prereq: ENGR 210. Prereq or Coreq: MATH 224.

This course is co-taught by Vira Chankong and Roberto Fernandez Galan

 

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 2:45-4:45p

Instructor: Vira Chankong

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS 281: Logic Design and Computer Organization

Fundamentals of digital systems in terms of both computer organization and logic level design. Organization of digital computers; information representation; boolean algebra; analysis and synthesis of combinational and sequential circuits; datapaths and register transfers; instruction sets and assembly language; input/output and communication; memory.  Prereq ENGR 131:  or EECS 132.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuTh 1:00-3:10pm; W 1:00-3:10pm

Instructor: Evren Gurkan Cavusoglu

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, New 2017 Summer

EECS 301: Digital Logic Laboratory

This course is an introductory experimental laboratory for digital networks. The course introduces students to the process of design, analysis, synthesis and implementation of digital networks. The course covers the design of combinational circuits, sequential networks, registers, counters, synchronous/asynchronous Finite State Machines, register based design, and arithmetic computational blocks. Prereq: EECS 281.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: W 11:00a-12:00p

Instructor: John Gibbons

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS 398: Engineering Projects I

Capstone course for electrical, computer and systems and control engineering seniors. Material from previous and concurrent courses used to solve engineering design problems. Professional engineering topics such as project management, engineering design, communications, and professional ethics. Requirements include periodic reporting of progress, plus a final oral presentation and written report. Scheduled formal project presentations during last week of classes. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone. Prereq: Senior Standing. Prereq or Coreq: ENGR 398 and ENGL 398.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: Tu 11:00a-12:00p

Instructor: Gregory Lee

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS 399: Engineering Projects II

Continuation of EECS 398. Material from previous and concurrent courses applied to engineering design and research. Requirements include periodic reporting of progress, plus a final oral presentation and written report. Prereq: Senior Standing.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: Tu 11:00a-12:00p

Instructor: Gregory Lee

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EMAE 181: Dynamics

Elements of classical dynamics: particle kinematics and dynamics, including concepts of force, mass, acceleration, work, energy, impulse, momentum. Kinetics of systems of particles and of rigid bodies, including concepts of mass center, momentum, mass moment of inertia, dynamic equilibrium. Elementary vibrations. Recommended preparation: MATH 122 and PHYS 121 and ENGR 200.

 

Distance Learning Section (ITN) also offered.  Please see Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWThF 9:00-10:20a

Instructor: Richard Bachmann

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

EMAE 250: Computers in Mechanical Engineering

Numerical methods including analysis and control of error and its propagation, solutions of systems of linear algebraic equations, solutions of nonlinear algebraic equations, curve fitting, interpolation, and numerical integration and differentiation. Recommended preparation: ENGR 131 and MATH 122.

 

Distance Learning Section (ITN) also offered.  Please see Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWThF 11:00a-12:20p

Instructor: Richard Bachmann

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

ENGL 180: Writing Tutorial

Substantial scheduled tutorial work in writing.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: Individual appointments

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 1 credit

Department: English

ENGL 203: Introduction to Creative Writing

A course exploring basic issues and techniques of writing narrative prose and verse through exercises, analysis, and experiment. For students who wish to try their abilities across a spectrum of genres.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuTh 6:00-8:15p

Instructor: Blakeslee, Erin

Credits: 3 credits

Department: English

ENGR 131: Elementary Computer Programming

Students will learn the fundamentals of computer programming and algorithmic problem solving. Concepts are illustrated using a wide range of examples from engineering, science, and other disciplines. Students learn how to create, debug, and test computer programs, and how to develop algorithmic solution to problems and write programs that implement those solutions. Matlab is the primary programming language used in this course, but other languages may be introduced or used throughout. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 10:30-11:50a

Instructor: Chris Fietkiewicz

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 145: Chemistry of Materials

Application of fundamental chemistry principles to materials. Emphasis is on bonding and how this relates to the structure and properties in metals, ceramics, polymers and electronic materials. Application of chemistry principles to develop an understanding of how to synthesize materials.  Prereq: CHEM 111 or equivalent.

 

Distance learning section (ITN) available. Check Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuW 1:30-3:30p; REC Th 1:30-2:30p

Instructor: Peter Lagerlof

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 200: Statics and Strength of Materials

An introduction to the analysis, behavior and design of mechanical/structural systems. Course topics include: concepts of equilibrium; geometric properties and distributed forces; stress, strain and mechanical properties of materials; and, linear elastic behavior of elements. Prereq: PHYS 121.

 

Distance Learning Section (ITN) also offered.  Check Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

 

Dates: July 10-August 4, 2017

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 10:30a-1:20p

Instructor: Xiangwu Zeng

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 200T: Statics and Strength of Materials: Tianjin, China

An introduction to the analysis, behavior and design of mechanical/structural systems. Course topics include: concepts of equilibrium; geometric properties and distributed forces; stress, strain and mechanical properties of materials; and, linear elastic behavior of elements.  Prereq: PHYS 121.

For more information, please visit the course website.

Dates: May 28-June 13, 2017

Time: Course meets in Tianjin, China

Instructor: Xiangwu Zeng

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Engineering, Study Abroad

ENGR 210: Introduction to Circuits and Instrumentation

Modeling and circuit analysis of analog and digital circuits. Fundamental concepts in circuit analysis: voltage and current sources, Kirchhoff’s Laws, Thevenin, and Norton equivalent circuits, inductors capacitors, and transformers. Modeling sensors and amplifiers and measuring DC device characteristics. Characterization and measurement of time dependent waveforms. Transient behavior of circuits. Frequency dependent behavior of devices and amplifiers, frequency measurements. AC power and power measurements. Electronic devices as switches.  Prereq: MATH 122. Prereq or Coreq: PHYS 122.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuW 2:30-4:30p

Instructor: Richard Kolacinski

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 225: Thermodynamics, Fluid Dynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer

Elementary thermodynamic concepts: first and second laws, and equilibrium. Basic fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and mass transfer: microscopic and macroscopic perspectives.  Prereq: CHEM 111, ENGR 145, and PHYS 121. Coreq: MATH 223.

 

Distance Learning Section (ITN) also offered.  Check Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 4:00-6:00p; REC: M 4:00-5:55p

Instructor: Paul Barnhart

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 225B: Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, Heat and Mass Transfer: Botswana

Elementary thermodynamic concepts: first and second laws, and equilibrium. Basic fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and mass transfer: microscopic and macroscopic perspectives. The course will be taught at the University of Botswana, and engineering applications will be discussed in the context of regional issues specific to Botswana.  Prereq: CHEM 111, ENGR 145, and PHYS 121. Coreq: MATH 223.

This course is co-taught by Daniel Lacks and Ramanathan Sankaran

For more information, please visit the course website.

 

 

Dates: May 30-June 17, 2017

Time: Course meets in Botswana

Instructor: Daniel Lacks

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Engineering, Study Abroad

ETHS 306: The Cuban Experience: an immersion in its culture and society

This is a three week study-abroad intensive course that takes place at Editorial Vigía, in Matanzas, Cuba. The course combines the unique advantages of a total immersion environment in Spanish with a classroom curriculum that includes conversation practice and study of relevant cultural, literary and historical issues. Students complete three hours of classroom instruction and an hour and a half of publishing workshop four days per week. In this workshop, they work in the edition of a bilingual book. In addition, they participate in organized visits to historic sites and museums connected to the culture curriculum. The focus of the culture curriculum is the study of Cuban history and culture through its literature, visual arts, films, and music. After applying and being accepted in the program, students meet for personal advising with the program director and attend four different one hour orientation-information meetings in the spring semester. After successful completion of the study-abroad program, students receive 3 upper-level credits in Spanish. The course is interdisciplinary in approach and provides students with the tools they need to analyze and understand the complexities of modern Cuba. Students will have formal classes taught by their professor and talks and meetings with specialists on Cuban literature, art, architecture, history and other aspects of culture and society. In addition, they will attend lectures, participate in discussions, and take field trips that will expose them to many aspects of Cuban culture, such as art, architecture, music, dance, film, literature, artisan work, folklore, history and urban growth. Offered as SPAN 306, SPAN 406, and ETHS 306. Prereq: SPAN 202.

 

For more information, please visit the course website.

Dates: May 13-June 4, 2017

Time: Course meets in Cuba

Instructor: Damaris Punales-Alpizar

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Ethnic Studies, Study Abroad

FRCH 308/408: The Paris Experience

Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Paris. The focus of the course is the literature and culture of the African, Arab, and Asian communities of Paris. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural centers and museums and interviewing authors and students about the immigrant experience. Assigned readings complement course activities. Students enrolled in FRCH 308/408 do coursework in French. WLIT 308/408 students have the option of completing coursework in English. Graduate students have additional course requirements. Offered as FRCH 308, WLIT 308, FRCH 408, and WLIT 408. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: FRCH 202.

Dates: May 14 - June 4, 2017

Time: Course meets in Paris, France

Instructor: Cheryl Toman

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, Study Abroad

FRCH 313/413: Medical French

Medical French is an upper-level course with a focus on health care in France and other Francophone countries. Students gain knowledge of the health care structures of various Francophone countries, as well as the vocabulary used in professional medical communication. Special emphasis on Doctors without Borders (Medecins sans frontieres). There will be visits to local hospitals and health care sites. Press articles, media reports, films, videos, and short literary texts are used as resources. Offered as FRCH 313 and FRCH 413. Prereq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Marie Lathers

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

HSTY 113: Introduction to Modern World History

The history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in global context. Emphasis on the forces that have created or shaped the modern world: industrialization and technological change; political ideas and movements such as nationalism; European imperialism and decolonization; and the interplay of cultural values. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

Dates: June 19-July 31, 2017

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TuTh 9:30a-12:30p

Instructor: Nathan Delaney

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

HSTY 219: Berlin in the Tumultuous 20th Century (Germany)

This course has been cancelled.

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

HSTY 306/406: History Museums: Theory and Reality

This course is an intensive summer internship (10 hours per week) at the Western Reserve Historical Society, complemented by extensive readings in museum/archival theory and public historical perception. It is designed both to introduce students to museum/archival work and to compare theoretical concepts with actual museum situations. Interns will be assigned a specific project within one of the Society’s curatorial or administrative divisions, but will have the opportunity to work on ancillary tasks throughout the Historical Society’s headquarters in University Circle. Offered as HSTY 306 and HSTY 406.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TBD

Instructor: John Grabowski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

MATH 121: Calculus for Science and Engineering I

Functions, analytic geometry of lines and polynomials, limits, derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Definite integral, antiderivatives, fundamental theorem of calculus, change of variables. Recommended preparation: Three and one half years of high school mathematics. Credit for at most one of MATH 121, MATH 123 and MATH 125 can be applied to hours required for graduation. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 8:45-10:15a

Instructor: Jessica Redmon

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 122: Calculus for Science and Engineering II

Continuation of MATH 121. Exponentials and logarithms, growth and decay, inverse trigonometric functions, related rates, basic techniques of integration, area and volume, polar coordinates, parametric equations. Taylor polynomials and Taylor’s theorem.  Prereq: MATH 121, MATH 123 or MATH 126.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 8:45-10:15a

Instructor: Robert Volkin

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 125: Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci I

Discrete and continuous probability; differential and integral calculus of one variable; graphing, related rates, maxima and minima. Integration techniques, numerical methods, volumes, areas. Applications to the physical, life, and social sciences. Students planning to take more than two semesters of introductory mathematics should take MATH 121. Prereq: Three and one half years of high school mathematics. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 8:45-10:15a

Instructor: Isaac Oduro

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 126: Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci II

Continuation of MATH 125 covering differential equations, multivariable calculus, discrete methods. Partial derivatives, maxima and minima for functions of two variables, linear regression. Differential equations; first and second order equations, systems, Taylor series methods; Newton’s method; difference equations. Prereq: MATH 121, MATH 123 or MATH 125.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 8:45-10:15a

Instructor: Vincent Graziano

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 201: Introduction to Linear Algebra

Matrix operations, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, subspaces, bases and linear independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization of matrices, linear transformations, determinants. Less theoretical than MATH 308. May not be taken for credit by mathematics majors. Only one of MATH 201 or MATH 308 may be taken for credit. Prereq: MATH 122, MATH 124 or MATH 126.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 10:45a-12:00p

Instructor: Carrie Winterer

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 223: Calculus for Science and Engineering III

Introduction to vector algebra; lines and planes. Functions of several variables: partial derivatives, gradients, chain rule, directional derivative, maxima/minima. Multiple integrals, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Derivatives of vector valued functions, velocity and acceleration. Vector fields, line integrals, Green’s theorem. Prereq: MATH 122 or MATH 124.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 9:00-10:15a

Instructor: Christopher Butler

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 224: Elementary Differential Equations

A first course in ordinary differential equations. First order equations and applications, linear equations with constant coefficients, linear systems, Laplace transforms, numerical methods of solution. Prereq: MATH 223 or MATH 227.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 9:00-10:15a

Instructor: Ulises Fidalgo

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

NTRN 362/462: Exercise Physiology and Macronutrient Metabolism

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge of theoretical and applied concepts of exercise physiology. Students will gain an understanding of the acute and chronic physiological responses and adaptations of the cardiovascular, metabolic, hormonal, and neuromuscular systems in response to exercise.  Additional topics include factors effecting performance, assessing cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness, designing exercise programs for health and wellness, special populations, and athletes, environmental considerations and nutrition’s role in sport and exercise performance.

Offered as NTRN 362 and NTRN 462.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWTh 4:00-5:15p

Instructor: Lynn Kam

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Nutrition

PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy

Basic problems of philosophy and methods of philosophical thinking. Problems raised by science, morality, religion, politics, and art. Readings from classical and contemporary philosophers. Normally given in multiple sections with different instructors and possibly with different texts. All sections share core materials in theory of knowledge, metaphysics, and ethics despite differences that may exist in emphasis.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Chris Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHIL 201: Introduction to Logic

Presentation, application, and evaluation of formal methods for determining the validity of arguments. Discussion of the relationship between logic and other disciplines. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Colin McLarty

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHYS 115: Introductory Physics I

First part of a two-semester sequence directed primarily towards students working towards a B.A. in science, with an emphasis on the life sciences. Kinematics; Newton’s laws; gravitation; simple harmonic motion; mechanical waves; fluids; ideal gas law; heat and the first and second laws of thermodynamics. This course has a laboratory component.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 9:30-11:20a; Lab: MW 12:30-3:30p

Instructor: Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 116: Introductory Physics II

Electrostatics, Coulomb’s law, Gauss’s law; capacitance and resistance; DC circuits; magnetic fields; electromagnetic induction; RC and RL circuits; light; geometrical optics; interference and diffraction; special relativity; introduction to quantum mechanics; elements of atomic, nuclear and particle physics. This course has a laboratory component. Prereq: PHYS 115.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: July 10-August 4, 2017

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWThF 9:30-11:20a; Lab: MW 12:30-3:30p

Instructor: Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 121: General Physics I – Mechanics

Particle dynamics, Newton’s laws of motion, energy and momentum conservation, rotational motion, and angular momentum conservation. This course has a laboratory component. Recommended preparation: MATH 121 or MATH 123 or MATH 125 or one year of high school calculus.

 

This course is co-taught by Harsh Mathur and Corbin Covault.  The laboratory is taught by Diana Driscoll.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 9:30-11:20a; Lab: TuTh 12:30-3:30p

Instructor: Corbin Covault and Harsh Mathur

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 122: General Physics II – Electricity and Magnetism

Electricity and magnetism, emphasizing the basic electromagnetic laws of Gauss, Ampere, and Faraday. Maxwell’s equations and electromagnetic waves, interference, and diffraction. This course has a laboratory component. Prereq: PHYS 121 or PHYS 123. Prereq or Coreq: MATH 122 or MATH 124 or MATH 126.

 

This course is co-taught by Harsh Mathur and Corbin Covault.  The laboratory is taught by Diana Driscoll.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: July 10-August 4, 2017

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWThF 9:30-11:20a; Lab: TuTh 12:30-3:30p

Instructor: Corbin Covault and Harsh Mathur

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

POSC 389/489: Special Topics in American Politics and Policy: The Battle of the Budget

Specific topic will vary but will consist of an in-depth investigation of a particular policy area or political phenomenon. Topics will involve policy controversies of some current interest. Offered as POSC 389 and POSC 489.

THIS COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELLED FOR SUMMER 2017.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2017 Summer, Political Science

PSCL 101: General Psychology I

Methods, research, and theories of psychology. Basic research from such areas as psychophysiology, sensation, perception, development, memory, learning, psychopathology, and social psychology.

Dates: June 19-July 31, 2017

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 10:30a-12:35p

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 282: Quantitative Methods in Psychology

The theory and application of basic methods used in the analysis of psychological data. Not available for credit to students who have completed STAT 201 or ANTH 319. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWThF 9:00-10:45a

Instructor: Arin Connell

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 313: Psychology of Personality

The development and organization of personality; theories of personality and methods for assessing the person; problems of personal adjustment.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuTh 10:30a-1:00p

Instructor: Heath Demaree

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 321: Abnormal Psychology

Major syndromes of mental disorders, their principal symptoms, dynamics, etiology, and treatment. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 19-July 31, 2017

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MoTuW 1:00-3:05p

Instructor: Amy Przeworski

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2017 Summer, Psychological Sciences

PSCL 353: Psychology of Learning

The basic methods in the study of learning. The major theories proposed to account for the learning process. Development of the fundamental concepts and principles governing the learning process in both humans and lower animal. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 19-July 31, 2017

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 4:30-6:35p

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2017 Summer, Psychological Sciences

PSCL 375: Research Design and Analysis

Conceptual and methodological issues confronted by the behavioral scientist conducting research. Major experimental designs and statistical procedures. Intuitive understanding of the mathematical operations. Recommended preparation: PSCL 282. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MW 9:00a-12:30p

Instructor: Amy Przeworski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 453: Seminars in Psychology: Child Development

A Special Problem or Topic Seminar. Content varies with student and faculty interest. This summer the Child development class will be designed to address the needs of students from Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center and MSASS who are enrolled in the Early Intervention Program. Biological, cognitive, psychosocial, and emotion foundations in infancy, childhood and adolescence will be discussed.

Dates: May 15-25, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWTh 9:00a-11:55a

Instructor: Elizabeth Short

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

RLGN 215: Religion in America

This course is an introduction to American religions, with a particular focus on religious diversity in the United States. As we examine the myriad beliefs and practices of America’s religious communities, we will pay close attention to how religion and culture have shaped each other from the 1600s to today.

To explore the theme of religious diversity, we will take advantage of Cleveland’s rich religious history with visits to local religious institutions and historical sites, including churches, mosques, new religious communities, and Hindu and Buddhist temples. Along the way we will consider the role of religious spaces and institutions in shaping identity and community in our region and beyond.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Justine Howe

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2017 Summer, Religious Studies

SOCI 113: Critical Problems in Modern Society

Focus is on major social problems present in large, complex, industrial societies. Topics include environmental problems, poverty, drug addiction, social deviance, and alienation.

Dates: June 5-June 30, 2017

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TuWTh 1:00-4:00p

Instructor: Jessica Kelley-Moore

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SOCI 208: Dating, Marriage and Family

What is the family today? How has it changed over the last century? How will it change in the future? This course aims to answer these questions as it explores the influences of work, education, government, health and religion on today’s changing families. The course considers the factors that affect mate selection. It also examines parenting, roles of husbands and wives, and family dysfunction, and divorce.

 

 

Dates: July 10-August 4, 2017

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 10:30a-12:45p

Instructor: Karie Feldman

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SOCI 250: Law and Society: Law, Rights and Policy

How does the U.S. legal system “work”? How does a judge make a decision? Do rights matter? Do human rights work the same way? Class participants will examine how rights, including human rights, fit in the legal system and society. We will ask how legal actors, like judges and lawyers, think about rights compared to non-lawyers. Class participants will observe court hearings in a Federal District Court, an Ohio Appellate Court, as well as local small claims court. We will benefit from hearing experts, local, national, and international, discuss how “law” works and whether rights are useful to making change.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Brian Gran

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SPAN 306/406: The Cuban Experience: an immersion in its culture and society

This is a three week study-abroad intensive course that takes place at Editorial Vigía, in Matanzas, Cuba. The course combines the unique advantages of a total immersion environment in Spanish with a classroom curriculum that includes conversation practice and study of relevant cultural, literary and historical issues. Students complete three hours of classroom instruction and an hour and a half of publishing workshop four days per week. In this workshop, they work in the edition of a bilingual book. In addition, they participate in organized visits to historic sites and museums connected to the culture curriculum. The focus of the culture curriculum is the study of Cuban history and culture through its literature, visual arts, films, and music. After applying and being accepted in the program, students meet for personal advising with the program director and attend four different one hour orientation-information meetings in the spring semester. After successful completion of the study-abroad program, students receive 3 upper-level credits in Spanish. The course is interdisciplinary in approach and provides students with the tools they need to analyze and understand the complexities of modern Cuba. Students will have formal classes taught by their professor and talks and meetings with specialists on Cuban literature, art, architecture, history and other aspects of culture and society. In addition, they will attend lectures, participate in discussions, and take field trips that will expose them to many aspects of Cuban culture, such as art, architecture, music, dance, film, literature, artisan work, folklore, history and urban growth. Offered as SPAN 306, SPAN 406, and ETHS 306. Prereq: SPAN 202.

For more information, please visit the course website.

Dates: May 13-June 4, 2017

Time: Course meets in Cuba

Instructor: Damaris Punales-Alpizar

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, Study Abroad

STAT 312: Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science

For advanced undergraduate students in engineering, physical sciences, life sciences. Comprehensive introduction to probability models and statistical methods of analyzing data with the object of formulating statistical models and choosing appropriate methods for inference from experimental and observational data and for testing the model’s validity. Balanced approach with equal emphasis on probability, fundamental concepts of statistics, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, design of experiments, and regression modeling. Note: Credit given for only one (1) of STAT 312, STAT 313, STAT 333, STAT 433. Prereq: MATH 122 or equivalent.

Dates: June 19-July 31, 2017

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MTuW 4:00-6:00p

Instructor: Wojbor Woyczynski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

THTR 100: Introduction to Acting

A course designed to provide the non-major or undeclared liberal arts major experience with a basic understanding of acting and performance. Fundamentals in improvisation, vocabulary, and scene study are stressed. This course fulfills THTR 101 or THTR 102 should the undeclared student select theater as his or her major or minor. Students may receive credit for only one of THTR 100, THTR 101, or THTR 102.

Dates: June 5-July 7, 2017

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuW 6:00-8:20p

Instructor: Christopher Bohan

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2017 Summer, Theater

THTR 206: Mr. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang: James Bond and Popular Culture

The twenty-one films of James Bond have become part of popular culture, and the figure of the superspy has become mythic in proportion. This series, from its first installment in 1963 to the latest reinvention of James Bond in 2006, not only depicts one dashing man’s efforts to save the world from disaster again and again, but also traces the development of our popular culture. Issues of violence, sex, the presentation and treatment of women, racial stereotypes, and spectacle among other topics can be discussed after viewing each film, providing an opportunity to explore the changing expectations of American audiences and the developing form of contemporary cinema. Students who have taken USSO 286D may not receive credit for this class.

Dates: May 15-June 2, 2017

Session: May Term

Time: MW 9:30a-1:00p; TuThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Jeffrey Ullom

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Theater

USNA 285: The Science of Madness: An Historical Investigation of Mental Illness

Since antiquity the western world’s understanding of mental illness has continued to evolve. This course will examine the trajectory of that evolution, looking at the medical theories that have influenced assumptions about the causes and treatments of mental illness from the early modern era through the twenty-first century. Examples of questions we will investigate include: How we have defined the normal and the pathological in human mental behavior over time? How do we explain the centuries-old correlation that medicine has made between creativity and mental illness? Which past and present psychiatric treatments have been beneficial and which harmful? How did Darwin’s theory of evolution affect theories of mental illness (and how does it continue to do so with the advent of evolutionary psychology)? How have changing philosophies of science affected the research and practice of psychology? How and why do the sciences of the mind–psychiatry, psychoanalysis, clinical psychology, psychopharmacology, the cognitive neurosciences–claim so much scientific authority and exert influence over our lives today? As a frame work for this inquiry, the class will use the concept of paradigm shifts as Thomas Kuhn defines in his classic work, the Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Prereq: Passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSNA, FSCC, FSSO, FSSY or FSCS. Prereq or Coreq: FSTS 100.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 4:00-5:30p

Instructor: Barbara Burgess-Van Aken

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USNA 288W: Medieval Science

Humans have always had ways to distinguish themselves from one another, employing different approaches to defining concepts we now refer to as race/ethnicity, dis/ability, sexuality, and gender. Science has always been an important component to these constructs, although what constituted science and scientific inquiry varied widely based on culture and historical context. Most recently, our advancing understanding of genetics has produced ever more nuanced definitions of human difference, even as we have come to recognize that such explanations often compete with theories that are grounded in social and cultural values, rather than scientific observation. Yet how did people explain human diversity in the 1000 years before the Scientific Revolution unfolded in Europe?

In this seminar, we will investigate how medieval thinkers differentiated humans using a mix of medical observation, philosophy, theories about the natural world, cultural prejudice, and religious belief. We will examine how Greek, Roman, Chinese, Indian, Arab, and early European theories of human difference shaped a medieval view of humanity that is occasionally strikingly different from our own and often quite familiar. How did people living in this period differentiate humans from the rest of the natural world? Did they use the same categories of race, gender, and sexuality that we use? How did scientific thinking evolve to construct these taxonomies of difference? How did historical movements and events such as global commerce, the slave trade, and the Crusades influence the development of these ways of thinking? To explore these questions, we will read a variety of primary texts from the medieval period, in the hopes that by discussing these other approaches to defining human differences, we will gain greater insight into our own frameworks and assumptions.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWTh 2:30-4:00p

Instructor: Lisa Nielson

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2017 Summer, SAGES

USNA 288Y: The Survival of Humans

Although people use the words “natural” or “Mother Nature” to suggest that the natural world is kind and considerate to humans, human survival could just as easily be viewed as occurring despite nature, rather than being facilitated by it. At the moment, humans are the dominant species on Earth, but past geological records suggest that human dominance is only temporary.  Indeed, there have been five clearly identified mass extinctions in the history of the Earth, and it is likely that another mass extinction will occur, through “natural” or human-driven causes.  The course will cover how any species survives to pass on genetic material, with a particular emphasis on ways that humans are at risk. In order to explore this topic, students will learn about physical and biological phenomena that affect the physiology and evolution of a species.  We will discuss the risk factors for different types of mass extinctions, how a threat to one species might provide opportunities for other species, and how humans might prepare to withstand a threat to their survival. Students will debate questions such as how humans react to a gradual threat such as climate change as compared to a catastrophic event such as a meteor strike; what people would do if they knew the end of Earth was approaching; and what technology might aid human survival.  We will draw from biology, chemistry, epidemiology, physiology, and astronomy to understand how humans are fighting a battle for survival with the natural world.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWTh 10:45a-12:15p

Instructor: Jennifer Butler

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2017 Summer, SAGES

USSO 288C: Green Transformation and Globalization

This seminar introduces students to the recent major green transformation in China and elsewhere in the world, focusing on the way the green changes took place in relation to globalization, environment and climate protection, technology innovation, income redistribution, domestic consumption, and education, to meet the challenges of financial crisis, climate change, energy insecurity, and international competition. The seminar will also assess the impacts of various aspects of green transformation and globalization on today’s and future world and vice versa. This seminar promotes broad knowledge of-and increased appreciation of the importance of diversity in China’s cultural past, social frameworks, economic conditions, and natural environment. In a close connection to the primary readings, which include several recent relevant works, the students will be exposed to a variety of related primary and secondary materials (such as texts, photos, film clips, music, songs, and websites). In addition to receiving informative yet concise instruction, the student will also be involved in practice in critical reading and thinking, in writing and orally presenting research papers. In these activities, the students will be introduced to basic methods and concepts critical to the understanding of important economic, social, and cultural developments and changes as products of movements rather than isolated incidents. Prereq: Passing letter grade in a first year seminar in FSCC, FSNA, FSSY or FSCS. Prereq or Coreq: FSTS 100. Requisites not met permission required if previous course completion in this subject group.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuTh 2:00-4:20p

Instructor: Peter Yang

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSO 291J: Narratives of Immigration

As one of the most pressing issues of the twenty-first century, immigration has captured the imagination of politicians and authors alike. In this class, we will explore the stories of those who have migrated to the United States. We will analyze how various writers create autobiographical and fictional narratives of migration, addressing issues such as adjusting to different cultures, learning new languages, and adapting to new environments. Through these stories and histories, we will ask broader questions about immigration, including: is migration a basic human right? Is it ethical to define someone as being “illegal” for peacefully working and living in a different country from where they were born? What are the gendered, ethnic, cultural, and racial barriers that exist when migrating between countries? What are the cost(s) of citizenship and embracing a new country as one’s home? As the United States is largely seen as a nation of immigrants, how have immigrants’ stories perpetuated or undermined this reputation?

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuTh 6:00-8:30p

Instructor: Cara Byrne

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2017 Summer, SAGES

USSY 291W: World War I in Literature and Culture

As cities around the globe mark the centennial of World War I (1914–1918), this seminar will explore the relationship between that watershed moment and the varieties of literature and art it inspired. In what ways did “the Great War” shape the direction of twentieth-century culture? How was language itself altered, as new vocabularies emerged (e.g., “shell-shock,” “the home front”) and previously venerable terms such as “honor” and “sacrifice” acquired radically different connotations? What strategies did writers and artists evolve in order to contend with the magnitude of the conflict and its unprecedented human cost? Assessing the war’s impact on Western thought, the poet Philip Larkin famously wrote, “Never such innocence again”—yet this loss of innocence also coincided with the birth of new forms of literary and artistic expression. In this course we’ll discuss and write about such innovations as they occurred in the visual arts—painting, sculpture, film—and in literary works by Ernest Hemingway, Virginia Woolf, and other writers who used the resources of imaginative literature to grapple with the Great War and its consequences.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWR 12:00-1:30p

Instructor: Steven Pinkerton

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2017 Summer, SAGES

USSY 292X: Internal Medicine: Memoir, Medical Education, and the Making of a Physician

Approximately 18,000 people graduate from medical school in the United States every year, and increasingly, many of them are writing about their experience of medical school in blog posts, essay collections, and memoirs. But why would a medical doctor, who has limited free time, choose to write about their experience of medical school at all? In this class, we will investigate how we understand the figure of the physician in our cultural imagination; how/why do memoirs and autobiographies help the public construct that image; and how does writing a memoir help physicians construct and maintain their own sense of self? In our search of answers to these questions, we will analyze several memoirs, essays, and edited collections written by medical students and physicians that focus on the experience of medical school, and what it actually means to become a doctor. We will gain insight into the ways that gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality have an impact on, and further complicate, this becoming. Finally, and most importantly, we will learn how physicians employ what renowned surgeon and author Dr. Richard Selzer thought of as the ultimate coping strategy: writing.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2017

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MW 6:00-8:30p

Instructor: Melissa Pompili

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2017 Summer, SAGES

WLIT 308/408: The Paris Experience

Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Paris. The focus of the course is the literature and culture of the African, Arab, and Asian communities of Paris. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural centers and museums and interviewing authors and students about the immigrant experience. Assigned readings complement course activities. Students enrolled in FRCH 308/408 do coursework in French. WLIT 308/408 students have the option of completing coursework in English. Graduate students have additional course requirements. Offered as FRCH 308, WLIT 308, FRCH 408, and WLIT 408. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

WLIT 308/408 does not have a language requirement.

 

For more information, please visit the course website.

Dates: May 14 - June 4, 2017

Time: Course meets in Paris, France

Instructor: Cheryl Toman

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Study Abroad, World Literature

Page last modified: March 9, 2017