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ANTH 102: Being Human: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

The nature of culture and humans as culture-bearing animals. The range of cultural phenomena including language, social organization, religion, and culture change, and the relevance of anthropology for contemporary social, economic, and ecological problems.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Jing Wang

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2018 Summer

ANTH 335: Illegal Drugs and Society

This course provides perspectives on illegal drug use informed by the social, political and economic dimensions of the issues. Framed by the history, epidemiology, and medical consequences of drug use, students will confront the complex challenges posed by addiction. Anthropological research conducted in the U.S. and cross-culturally will demonstrate, elaborate and juxtapose various clinical, public health, and law enforcement policies and perspectives. Topics examined will include: why exclusively using a bio-medical model of addiction is inadequate; how effective is the war on drugs; what prevention, intervention and treatment efforts work; and various ideological/moral perspectives on illegal drug use.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MW 10:30a-1:30p

Instructor: Allison Schlosser

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2018 Summer

ARTH 241: Medieval Art

This course will introduce students to the pivotal works of art created between approximately 250 and 1500. We will discuss painting, sculpture, architecture, manuscript illumination, and graphic arts. Medieval visual and material culture will be considered within the framework of socio-political developments, rapid urban growth, the flowering of monastic culture, the rise of universities, and changes in devotional practices. While the course will primarily focus on western part of the medieval Christendom, we will also discuss Jewish, Byzantine, and Islamic art. Course will be held at the Cleveland Museum of Art.  Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 10:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Gilbert Jones

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Art History and Art

ARTS 220: Photo I

Camera, film, and darkroom techniques. Development of basic black and white perceptual and photographic skills. Darkroom and photographic field and lab work. 35mm camera required.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuTh 6:00-9:00p

Instructor: Alexander Aitken

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

ARTS 286: Introduction to Video Games

Game design creates meaningful play through interactive experiences. This introductory studio based course, explores games through the development and creation of 2D video games. The course aims to provide a critical vocabulary and historical context for analyzing games and gaming theory and focuses on the skills and techniques necessary to develop 2D video games.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MW 4:00-6:55p

Instructor: Jared Bendis

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

ARTS 305/405: Pre-architecture Study Abroad

This 3-week intensive Wellington, New Zealand summer course immerses students into a culture that solves architectural problems through a sophisticated appreciation for design, aesthetics and conceptualization. The program introduces students to critical inquiry through shared principles and theories of art, architecture and design, as experienced in New Zealand’s cultural capital. Using the city as our classroom, students will visit well-known sites, museums and monuments as well as hidden gems that reinforce concepts presented in readings, lectures and class discussions.

For more information, please visit the course website

View course flyer

 

Dates: July 2-July 22, 2018

Session: Study Abroad

Time: Course meets in Wellington, New Zealand

Instructor: Sally Levine

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio, Study Abroad

ARTS 399: Independent Study in Art Studio

Independent Study in Art Studio; by permit of Director only. Contact Tim Shuckerow.

Class meets at Squire Valleevue Farm, lower farm.

Dates: June 4-June 29, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTuWThF 10:00a-3:30p

Instructor: Tim Shuckerow

Credits: 1-3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

ARTS 399: Independent Study Photo

Independent Study Photo; by permit of Director only. Contact Tim Shuckerow at txs10@case.edu.

Class meets at Squire Valleevue Farm, lower farm.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuTh 6:00-9:00p

Instructor: Alexander Aitken

Credits: 1-3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

ARTS 497: Summer Workshop in Art Education

A current art education issue is covered in depth.

Class meets at Squire Valleevue Farm, lower farm.

Dates: June 4-June 29, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTuWThF 10:00a-3:30p

Instructor: Tim Shuckerow

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

ASTR 201: The Sun and Its Planets

An overview of the solar system; the planets and other objects that orbit about the Sun and the Sun itself as the dominant mass and the most important source of energy in the solar system. Concepts and the development of our knowledge will be emphasized. Not available for credit to astronomy majors.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 10:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Jeffrey Kriessler

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Astronomy

BIOL 214: Genes, Ecology and Evolution

First in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on DNA and RNA); mitotic and meiotic cell cycles, gene expression, genetics, population genetics, evolution, biological diversity and ecology. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 111.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 10:000a-12:30p

Instructor: Deborah Harris

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 214L: Genes, Ecology and Evolution Laboratory

First in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (with a focus on DNA and RNA); basics of cell structure (with a focus on malaria research); molecular genetics, biotechnology; population genetics and evolution, ecology. Assignments will be in the form of a scientific journal submission. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 214.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: Lab: TuTh 1:00-4:00p; Discussion: MW 1:00-2:00p

Instructor: Deborah Harris

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 215: Cells and Proteins

Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on membranes, energy conversion organelles and cytoskeleton); protein structure-function; enzyme kinetics, cellular energetics, and cell communication and motility strategies. Prereq: BIOL 214 and (CHEM 105 or CHEM 111). Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 106 or ENGR 145.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Dianne Kube

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 215L: Cells and Proteins Laboratory

Second in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics to include: protein structure-function, enzymes kinetics; cell structure; cellular energetics, respiration and photosynthesis. In addition, membrane structure and transport will be covered. Laboratory and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. This course is not available for students who have taken BIOL 215 as a 4-credit course. Prereq: BIOL 214L and Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 215.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: Lab: TuTh 1:00-4:00p; Discussion: MW 1:00-2:00p

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 216: Development and Physiology

This is the final class in the series of three courses required of the Biology major. As with the two previous courses, BIOL 214 and 215, this course is designed to provide an overview of fundamental biological processes. It will examine the complexity of interactions controlling reproduction, development and physiological function in animals. The Developmental Biology section will review topics such as gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, the genetic control of development, stem cells and cloning. Main topics included in the Physiology portion consist of: homeostasis, the function of neurons and nervous systems; the major organ systems and processes involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, temperature regulation, endocrine function and the immunologic response.  Prereq: BIOL 214.

 

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:00-11:30a

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 216: Development and Physiology – Hybrid

This is the final class in the series of three courses required of the Biology major. As with the two previous courses, BIOL 214 and 215, this course is designed to provide an overview of fundamental biological processes. It will examine the complexity of interactions controlling reproduction, development and physiological function in animals. The Developmental Biology section will review topics such as gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, the genetic control of development, stem cells and cloning. Main topics included in the Physiology portion consist of: homeostasis, the function of neurons and nervous systems; the major organ systems and processes involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, temperature regulation, endocrine function and the immunologic response. There are two instructional modes for this course: lecture mode and hybrid mode. In the lecture mode students attend class for their instruction. In the hybrid mode students watch online lectures from the course instructor and attend discussion sections with the course instructor. The online content prepares students for the discussions.  The total student effort and course content is identical for both instructional modes. Either instructional mode fulfills the BIOL 216 requirement for the BA and BS in Biology. Prereq: BIOL 214.

*This section of BIOL 216 will be taught in the hybrid model. Due to the accelerated nature of the 5-week summer term, students are required to attend class every day (M-Th).*

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 10:00-11:45a

Instructor: Rebecca Benard

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 216L: Development and Physiology Laboratory

Third in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Students will conduct laboratory experiments designed to provide hands-on, empirical laboratory experience in order to better understand the complex interactions governing the basic physiology and development of organisms. Laboratories and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. Prereq: BIOL 214L. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 216.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: TuTh 12:30-3:30p, MW 12:30-1:30p

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 302: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does the human brain learn?” Through assigned readings, extensive class discussions, and a major paper, each student will explore personal perspectives on learning. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: the brain’s cycle of learning; neocortex structure and function; emotion and limbic brain; synapse dynamics and changes in learning; images in cognition; symbolic brain (language, mathematics, music); memory formation; and creative thought and brain mechanisms. The major paper will be added to each student’s SAGES writing portfolio. In addition, near the end of the semester, each student will make an oral presentation on a chosen topic. Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 9:00-11:30a

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 309/409: Field Studies in Biology

Spend Summer Session 2018 conducting scientific research on an island in Lake Erie. For two weeks, the course will be based at Kelley’s Island Field Station, located on Kelley’s Island in Lake Erie, 3.5 miles north of Marblehead, Ohio. Kelley’s Island has more than 15 miles of shoreline, over 150 acres of natural protected land and is home to unique geologic features including the Glacial Grooves and the North Shore Alvar. Class meetings in Cleveland will cover logistics, biodiversity, and current ecological, environmental, and social issues associated with Lake Erie. Time at the field site will be spent listening to resident lecturers, receiving guided tours, observing and identifying wild organisms in their natural habitat, and conducting a research project. Students will design a field-based research experiment, perform the experiment in the field, and then report their results in the form of a term paper and oral presentation. Instructor consent required to register. Course satisfies a laboratory requirement of the B.A. and B.S. in Biology. Course may be repeated for credit up to two times if traveling to a new destination. *Note: *Course requires students to be physically fit and in good health. Activities will include hiking and long periods spent outdoors. Students will be exposed to hot weather and biting/stinging insects.  Offered as BIOL 309 and BIOL 409. Prereq: BIOL 216. The course fee will be $500 for housing, transportation, and equipment. Food not included.

Week 1: 6/4-6/9, MWF, 10:00-10:50, on campus; Weeks 2-3: 6/11-6/22, Kelley’s Island; Week 4: 6/25-6/29, MWF, 10:00-10:50, on campus

Dates: Week 1: 6/4-6/9, MWF, 10:00-10:50, on campus; Weeks 2-3: 6/11-6/22, Kelley's Island; Week 4: 6/25-6/29, MWF, 10:00-10:50, on campus

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TBA

Instructor: Ronald Oldfield

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2018 Summer

BIOL 312: Introductory Plant Biology

This course will provide an overview of plant biology. Topics covered will include: (1) Plant structure, function and development from the cellular level to the whole plant (2) plant diversity, evolution of the bacteria, fungi, algae, bryophytes and vascular plants; (3) adaptations to their environment, plant-animal interactions, and human uses of plants. Prerequisite for this course: undergraduate student and [Biol 215]; or [Requisites not met Permission].

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2018 Summer

BIOL 330: Human Genetics: Diseases and Mechanisms

This course is a survey of human inherited diseases as examples of the molecular basis of genetic disease, developmental genetics, testing for inherited genetic disease, ethical dilemmas in human genetics, genetic diseases as drivers for drug development, and orphan inherited disorders. A combination of current and classic literature will be used to provide background on specific inherited human disorders, while a case-based approach will be used in the classroom to promote discussion. Classes will be in the format of a mixture of short lectures, student-led discussions, and formal presentations made by students. This course fulfills the cell and molecular breadth requirement for the BA and BS in Biology.  Prerequisite for this course: undergraduate student and [BIOL 326] or [Requisites not met Permission].

Dates: June 4-June 29, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTuWTh 3:00pm - 5:15pm

Instructor: Audrey Lynn

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2018 Summer

BIOL 343/443: Microbiology

The physiology, genetics, biochemistry, and diversity of microorganisms. The subject will be approached both as a basic biological science that studies the molecular and biochemical processes of cells and viruses, and as an applied science that examines the involvement of microorganisms in human disease as well as in workings of ecosystems, plant symbioses, and industrial processes. The course is divided into four major areas: bacteria, viruses, medical microbiology, and environmental and applied microbiology. Offered as BIOL 343 and BIOL 443. Prereq: BIOL 215 or BIOL 250.

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 10:00-11:45a

Instructor: Dianne Kube

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

CHEM 105: Principles of Chemistry I

Atomic structure; thermochemistry; periodicity, bonding and molecular structure; intermolecular forces; properties of solids; liquids, gases and solutions. Recommended preparation: One year of high school chemistry.

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 10:30a-12:20p

Instructor: Drew Meyer

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 106: Principles of Chemistry II

Thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium; acid/base chemistry; oxidation and reduction; kinetics; spectroscopy; introduction to nuclear, organic, inorganic, and polymer chemistry. Prereq: CHEM 105 or equivalent.

Dates: July 9-August 3, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 10:30a-12:40p

Instructor: Rekha Srinivasan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 113: Principles of Chemistry Laboratory

A one semester laboratory based on quantitative chemical measurements. Experiments include analysis, synthesis and characterization, thermochemistry and chemical kinetics. Computer analysis of data is a key part of all experiments. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or ENGR 145. A one semester laboratory based on quantitative chemical measurements. Experiments include analysis, synthesis and characterization, thermochemistry and chemical kinetics. Computer analysis of data is a key part of all experiments. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or ENGR 145.

Dates: July 9-August 3, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 1:00p-5:00p

Instructor: Drew Meyer

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 223: Introductory Organic Chemistry I

Introductory course for science majors and engineering students. Develops themes of structure and bonding along with elementary reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers as well as an introduction to spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111.

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWThF 10:30a-12:20p

Instructor: Raul E. Juarez Hernandez

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 224: Introductory Organic Chemistry II

Continues and extends themes of structure and bonding from CHEM 223 and continues spectroscopy and more complex reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of aromatic rings, carbonyl compounds, amines, and selected special topics. Prereq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

Dates: July 9-August 3, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWThF 10:30a-12:20p

Instructor: Krista Cunningham

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 233: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 and CHEM 113 or equivalent. Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323. An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 and CHEM 113 or equivalent. Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 1:00p-5:00p

Instructor: Krista Cunningham

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 234: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

A continuation of CHEM 233, involving multi-step organic synthesis, peptide synthesis, product purification and analysis using sophisticated analytical techniques such as chromatography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 233. Coreq: CHEM 224

Dates: July 9-August 3, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 1:00-5:00p

Instructor: Gregory Tochtrop

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 328/428: Introductory Biochemistry I

A survey of biochemistry with a strong emphasis on the chemical logic underlying metabolic pathways and the evolution of biomolecules. Cellular architecture. Amino acids and protein structure, purification, analysis, and synthesis. DNA, RNA, the flow of genetic information, and molecular biological technology. Enzyme kinetics, catalytic, and regulatory strategies. Sugars, complex carbohydrates, and glycoproteins. Lipids and cell membranes. Glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, carbon fixation through the “dark reactions” of photosynthesis, aerobic catabolism through the citric acid cycle, and glycogen metabolism. Biosynthesis and degradation of fatty acids, amino acids, and proteins. Offered as CHEM 328 and CHEM 428. Prereq: CHEM 224 or CHEM 324.

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 10:30a-12:20p

Instructor: Rekha Srinivasan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 348/448: Chemistry of Fermentation and Brewing

To discern the molecular basis of fermentation and beer brewing, this course includes in-depth discussions of the chemistry underlying either an aspect of the brewing process or a style of beer (alt, kolsch, porter, bock, mead, ale, etc.).  The biochemistry of yeast fermentation, as well as mashing, lautering, boiling, conditioning, filtering, and packaging will be discussed.  There is no lab component (such as brewing beer), although field trips to the Jolly-Scholar pub (located on campus) will be part of the course, as well as invited speakers who have set up local microbreweries.  Each student will be expected to have basic background knowledge of chemistry, such as material taught in standard first year General Chemistry courses (CHEM 105, 106, and 111).  Lastly, the teacher of this course is a seasoned chemistry professor who has extensive experience with brewing beer!

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Michael Zagorski

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Chemistry, New 2018 Summer

CLSC 202: Classical Mythology

The myths of Classical Greece and Rome, their interpretation and influence. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TuTh 9:00a-12:00p

Instructor: Rachel Sternberg

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Classics, New 2018 Summer

CLSC 318/418: Archaeological & Epigraphical Field School

This interdisciplinary course takes place in situ in the Mediterranean and will be attached to an active archaeological project. Students will learn the methodological principles of archaeological and epigraphical fieldwork by participating in activities such as surveying, excavation, museum work, geophysical survey, artifact analysis, and other scientific techniques. In addition to work in the field and museum, students will receive an introduction to the history Greco-Roman culture through visits to major archaeological sites in the region. Examples of active archaeological projects may vary, depending on the year. Offered as CLSC 318 and CLSC 418.

For more information, please visit the course website

Dates: June 13-July 7, 2018

Session: Study Abroad

Time: Course meets in Corinth, Greece

Instructor: Paul Iversen

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Classics, Study Abroad

COSI 406: Academic English Proficiency Speech Production

Students will work in small groups with the instructor/s to develop new speech habits and patterns to improve production of spoken English for academic and professional success. Following successful completion of the course the student will demonstrate an improvement of 50% from baseline speech production scores, and demonstrate the ability to practice sound production independently to assure continued refinement over time.

The course includes 90 minutes of small group instructions per week and a minimum of 50-60 minutes of daily practice. The student will be required to submit a minimum of 2 practice recordings per week for feedback.

Students who successfully complete this course will demonstrate 50% improvement from baseline speech production scores.

Permission of instructor required.  To register please contact Kurt Koenigsberger.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MF 8:30-10:00a

Instructor: Angela Ciccia

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, Psychological Sciences

DSCI 352: Applied Data Science Research

This is a project based data science research class, in which project teams identify a research project under the guidance of a domain expert professor. The research is structured as a data analysis project including the 6 steps of developing a reproducible data science project, including 1: Define the ADS question, 2: Identify, locate, and/or generate the data 3: Exploratory data analysis 4: Statistical modeling and prediction 5: Synthesizing the results in the domain context 6: Creation of reproducible research, Including code, datasets, documentation and reports.  During the course special topic lectures will include Ethics, Privacy, Openness, Security, Ethics. Value.  Offered as DSCI 352 and DSCI 452.  Prereq: (DSCI 133 or DSCI 134 or ENGR 131 or EECS 132) and (STAT 312R or STAT 201R or SYBB 310 or PQHS/EPBI 431 or OPRE 207) and (DSCI 351 or (SYBB 311A and SYBB 311B and SYBB 311C and SYBB 311D) or SYBB 321 or MKMR 201).

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 12:30-2:00p

Instructor: Laura Bruckman

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Data Science, New 2018 Summer

EBME 328: Biomedical Engineering R&D Training

This course will provide research and development in the laboratory of a mentoring faculty member.  Varied R&D experiences will include activities in biomedical instrumentation, tissue engineering, imaging, drug delivery, and neural engineering.  Each Student must identify a faculty mentor, and together they will create description of the training experience prior to the first class.  Prereq: EBME 201 and EBME 202.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TBA

Instructor: Anirban Sen Gupta

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biomedical Engineering

EBME 370: Principles of Biomedical Engineering Design

Students learn and implement the design process to produce working prototypes of medical devices with potential commercial value to meet significant clinical needs.  Critical examination of contemporary medical problems is used to develop a specific problem statement.  The class is divided into teams of 3 to 4 students.  Each team integrates their knowledge and skills to design a device to meet their clinical need.  Project planning and management, including resource allocation, milestones, and documentation, are required to ensure successful completion of projects within the allotted time and budget.  Formal design reviews by a panel of advisors and outside medical device experts are required every four weeks.  Every student is required to give oral presentations at each formal review and is responsible for formal documentation of the design process, resulting in an executive summary and complete design history file of the project.  The course culminates with a public presentation of the team’s device to a panel of experts.  This course is expected to provide the student with a real-world, capstone design experience.team’s device to a panel of experts.  This course is expected to provide the student with a real-world, capstone design experience.  Recommended preparation: EBME 310

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Colin Drummond

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Biomedical Engineering

ECHE 305: Topics in Chemical Engineering

Topics in chemical engineering will be covered in an independent study mode. Readings and homework assignments will be assigned. Students are graded on the basis of homework assignments and a final exam.

 

 

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TBA

Instructor: Daniel Lacks

Department: Chemical Engineering

EECS 233: Introduction to Data Structures

The programming language Java; pointers, files, and recursion. Representation and manipulation of data: one way and circular linked lists, doubly linked lists; the available space list. Different representations of stacks and queues. Representation of binary trees, trees and graphs. Hashing; searching and sorting.  Prereq: EECS 132.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuW 9:30-11:30am

Instructor: Staff

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS 246: Signals and Systems

Mathematical representation, characterization, and analysis of continuous-time signals and systems.  Development of elementary mathematical models of continuous-time dynamic systems.  Time domain and frequency domain analysis of linear time-invariant systems.  Fourier series, Fourier transforms, and Laplace transforms.  Sampling theorem.  Filter design.  Introduction to feedback control systems and feedback controller design.  Prereq: ENGR 210. Prereq or Coreq: MATH 224.

This course is co-taught by Vira Chankong and Roberto Fernandez Galan

 

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 2:45-4:45p

Instructor: Vira Chankong and Roberto Fernandez Galan

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS 398: Engineering Projects I

Capstone course for electrical, computer and systems and control engineering seniors.  Material from previous and concurrent courses used to solve engineering design problems.  Professional engineering topics such as project management, engineering design, communications, and professional ethics.  Requirements include periodic reporting of progress, plus a final oral presentation and written report.  Scheduled formal project presentations during last week of classes.  Prereq or Coreq: ENGR 398 and ENGL 398.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: Tu 11:00a-12:00p

Instructor: Sree Sreenath

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS 399: Engineering Projects II

Continuation of EECS 398.  Material from previous and concurrent courses applied to engineering design and research.  Requirements include periodic reporting of progress, plus a final oral presentation and written report.  Prereq: Senior Standing.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: Tu 11:00a-12:00p

Instructor: Sree Sreenath

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EEPS 215: Climate Crises in Earth History

The past century has seen three great revolutions in our understanding of how the earth works: a revolution our understanding of geologic time, construction of the tectonic cycle that creates continents and oceans, and most recently, the ability to trace using isotopes global geochemical cycles. One of these, the carbon cycle, is intimately tied to climate change. We now know there have been a handful of climate crises in earth history–at least five–during which the planet experienced large scale changes in a short time, and we live now in the midst of another. We will examine the large-scale workings of the earth system, how the carbon cycle interacts with climate on time scales from millions of years to millennia to decades, and get an accessible overview of what we know about ongoing climate change and its current and future impacts. No prior knowledge of geology is assumed, and the course is suitable for non-majors, though we will encounter a few equations, some graphs, and some very simple computer models.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MWF 2:30-4:30p

Instructor: Peter McCall

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

EMAE 181: Dynamics

Elements of classical dynamics: particle kinematics and dynamics, including concepts of force, mass, acceleration, work, energy, impulse, momentum. Kinetics of systems of particles and of rigid bodies, including concepts of mass center, momentum, mass moment of inertia, dynamic equilibrium. Elementary vibrations. Recommended preparation: MATH 122 and PHYS 121 and ENGR 200.

Distance Learning Section (ITN) also offered.  Please see Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWThF 9:00-10:20a

Instructor: Richard Bachmann

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

EMAE 250: Computers in Mechanical Engineering

Numerical methods including analysis and control of error and its propagation, solutions of systems of linear algebraic equations, solutions of nonlinear algebraic equations, curve fitting, interpolation, and numerical integration and differentiation. Recommended preparation: ENGR 131 and MATH 122.

 

Distance Learning Section (ITN) also offered.  Please see Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWThF 11:00a-12:20p

Instructor: Richard Bachmann

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

ENGL 180: Writing Tutorial

English 180 is a one-credit writing tutorial class designed to develop students’ expository writing skills through weekly scheduled conferences with a Writing Resource Center Instructor. Goals are to produce clear, well-organized, and mechanically-acceptable prose, and to demonstrate learned writing skills throughout the term. Course content is highly individualized based on the instructor’s initial assessment of the student’s writing, and the student’s individual concerns. All students must produce a minimum of 12 pages of finished writing, and complete other assignments as designated by the instructor.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: Individual appointments

Instructor: Megan Jewell

Credits: 1 credit

Department: English

ENGL 203: Introduction to Creative Writing

A course exploring basic issues and techniques of writing narrative prose and verse through exercises, analysis, and experiment. For students who wish to try their abilities across a spectrum of genres.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuTh 6:00-8:15p

Instructor: Melissa Pompili

Credits: 3 credits

Department: English

ENGL 414: Advanced Academic Communication and Presentation

In this course, graduate students develop the interactive speaking skills needed to participate effectively in seminar-style discussions and other formal group situations. In addition, the class focuses on the skills international graduate students need to organize and deliver presentations for academic and professional audiences. This class will reinforce and expand on oral communication strategies students learned in the previous semester.

Permission of Instructor is required.  To register please contact Kurt Koenigsberger

Dates: June 18-August 3, 2018

Time: MTuWTh 1:30-2:50p

Instructor: Ana Codita

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, New 2018 Summer

ENGL 415: Academic Research and Writing

The course focuses on the skills graduate students need to write research papers. This class will reinforce reading strategies students learned in the previous semester and graduate students will learn to organize ideas, synthesize material from written and other sources, and develop organizational and rhetorical skills appropriate to their discipline. Students will also learn to use reflection and self-assessment to become more independent and competent writers. This class will reinforce and expand on writing strategies students learned in the previous semester. Activities include small group work, analysis of academic texts, writing in a variety of academic genres, revising and editing, and tutorial sessions.

Permission of Instructor is required.  To register please contact Kurt Koenigsberger.

 

Dates: June 18-August 3, 2018

Time: MTuWTh 10:30-11:50a

Instructor: Ana Codita

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, New 2018 Summer

ENGR 131: Elementary Computer Programming

Students will learn the fundamentals of computer programming and algorithmic problem solving.  Concepts are illustrated using a wide range of examples from engineering, science, and other disciplines.  Students learn how to create, debug, and test computer programs, and how to develop algorithmic solution to problems and write programs that implement those solutions.  Matlab is the primary programming language used in this course, but other languages may be introduced or used throughout.   Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 10:30-11:50a

Instructor: Chris Fietkiewicz

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 145: Chemistry of Materials

Application of fundamental chemistry principles to materials. Emphasis is on bonding and how this relates to the structure and properties in metals, ceramics, polymers and electronic materials. Application of chemistry principles to develop an understanding of how to synthesize materials.   Prereq: CHEM 111 or equivalent.

 

Distance learning section (ITN) available. Check Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuW 1:30-3:30p; REC Th 1:30-2:30p

Instructor: Peter Lagerlof

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 200: Statics and Strength of Materials

An introduction to the analysis, behavior and design of mechanical/structural systems.  Course topics include: concepts of equilibrium; geometric properties and distributed forces; stress, strain and mechanical properties of materials; and, linear elastic behavior of elements.  Prereq: PHYS 121.

 

Distance Learning Section (ITN) also offered.  Check Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

 

Dates: July 9-August 3, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 10:30a-1:20p

Instructor: Xiangwu Zeng

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 200T: Statics and Strength of Materials

An introduction to the analysis, behavior and design of mechanical/structural systems.  Course topics include: concepts of equilibrium; geometric properties and distributed forces; stress, strain and mechanical properties of materials; and, linear elastic behavior of elements. Prereq: PHYS 121.

For more information, please visit the course website.

Dates: May 28-June 12, 2018

Session: Study Abroad

Time: MTuWTh 9:00-11:55a

Instructor: Xiangwu Zeng

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Engineering, Study Abroad

ENGR 210: Introduction to Circuits and Instrumentation

Modeling and circuit analysis of analog and digital circuits.  Fundamental concepts in circuit analysis: voltage and current sources, Kirchhoff’s Laws, Thevenin, and Norton equivalent circuits, inductors capacitors, and transformers.  Modeling sensors and amplifiers and measuring DC device characteristics.  Characterization and measurement of time dependent waveforms.  Transient behavior of circuits.  Frequency dependent behavior of devices and amplifiers, frequency measurements.  AC power and power measurements.  Electronic devices as switches.  Prereq: MATH 122. Prereq or Coreq: PHYS 122.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuW 2:30-4:30p; Lab TBD

Instructor: Christian Zorman

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 225: Thermodynamics, Fluid Dynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer

Elementary thermodynamic concepts: first and second laws, and equilibrium. Basic fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and mass transfer: microscopic and macroscopic perspectives.  Prereq: CHEM 111, ENGR 145, and PHYS 121. Coreq: MATH 223.

 

Distance Learning Section (ITN) also offered.  Check Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 4:00-6:00p; REC: M 4:00-5:55p

Instructor: Paul Barnhart

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 225B: Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, Heat and Mass Transfer

Elementary thermodynamic concepts: first and second laws, and equilibrium.  Basic fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and mass transfer: microscopic and macroscopic perspectives.  The course is taught as a faculty-led study abroad course, and engineering applications are discussed in the context of regional issues specific to the host country.  Prereq: CHEM 111, ENGR 145, and PHYS 121. Coreq: MATH 223.

For more information, please visit the course website

Dates: TBA

Session: Study Abroad

Time: MTuWThF 8:30-11:00a; REC: MTuWThF 1:00p-2:15p

Instructor: Daniel Lacks

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Engineering, Study Abroad

ETHS 306: The Cuban Experience

This is a three week study-abroad intensive course that takes place at Editorial Vigía, in Matanzas, Cuba. The course combines the unique advantages of a total immersion environment in Spanish with a classroom curriculum that includes conversation practice and study of relevant cultural, literary and historical issues. Students complete three hours of classroom instruction and an hour and a half of publishing workshop four days per week. In this workshop, they work in the edition of a bilingual book. In addition, they participate in organized visits to historic sites and museums connected to the culture curriculum. The focus of the culture curriculum is the study of Cuban history and culture through its literature, visual arts, films, and music. After applying and being accepted in the program, students meet for personal advising with the program director and attend four different one hour orientation-information meetings in the spring semester. After successful completion of the study-abroad program, students receive 3 upper-level credits in Spanish. The course is interdisciplinary in approach and provides students with the tools they need to analyze and understand the complexities of modern Cuba. Students will have formal classes taught by their professor and talks and meetings with specialists on Cuban literature, art, architecture, history and other aspects of culture and society. In addition, they will attend lectures, participate in discussions, and take field trips that will expose them to many aspects of Cuban culture, such as art, architecture, music, dance, film, literature, artisan work, folklore, history and urban growth. Offered as SPAN 306SPAN 406, and ETHS 306. Prereq: SPAN 202.

For more information, please visit the course website

Dates: July 8-July 29, 2018

Session: Study Abroad

Time: TBA

Instructor: Damaris Punales-Alpizar

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, Study Abroad

ETHS 338: The Cameroonian Experience

Immersion learning experience living and studying in Cameroon. The focus of the course is the culture, literature, and language of Francophone Cameroon, with some emphasis on Anglophone Cameroon. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural sites and attending arranged courses at the University of Buea. Students will prepare a research paper. Coursework is in French. To do coursework in English, students should enroll in WLIT 338 or ETHS 338. Offered as ETHS 338, FRCH 338, and WLIT 338.  Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: FRCH 202

For more information, please visit the course website

 

Dates: May 26-June 6, 2018

Session: May Term

Session: Study Abroad

Time: TBA

Instructor: Gilbert Doho

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Ethnic Studies, Study Abroad

FRCH 101: Elementary French I

Emphasizes conversational skills. Students are expected to achieve control of sound system and basic sentence structures of French. Students must complete assignments at the Online Language Learning Center in addition to attending scheduled class meetings.

Dates: June 4-June 29, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTuWThF 9:00-10:45a

Instructor: Charlotte Sanpere

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

FRCH 308/408: The Paris Experience

Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Paris. The focus of the course is the literature and culture of the African, Arab, and Asian communities of Paris. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural centers and museums and interviewing authors and students about the immigrant experience. Assigned readings complement course activities. Students enrolled in FRCH 308/408 do coursework in French. WLIT 308/408 students have the option of completing coursework in English. Graduate students have additional course requirements. Offered as FRCH 308, WLIT 308, FRCH 408, and WLIT 408. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: FRCH 202.

For more information, please visit the course website

The first 10 undergraduate students who enroll in The Paris Experience (FRCH 308) will receive a $1000 scholarship from the the Eirik Borve Fund for Foreign Language Instruction to go towards their study abroad language program. To be eligible, students must be CWRU undergraduates who have completed the initial study abroad application and submitted their deposit to the Office of Education Abroad. Only students enrolled in the language version of the course where the study abroad program is cross-listed are scholarship eligible. For additional questions, contact the Office of Education Abroad at studyabroad@case.edu.

Dates: May 13-June 2, 2018

Session: May Term

Session: Study Abroad

Time: Course meets in Paris, France

Instructor: Cheryl Toman

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, Study Abroad

FRCH 338: The Cameroonian Experience

Immersion learning experience living and studying in Cameroon. The focus of the course is the culture, literature, and language of Francophone Cameroon, with some emphasis on Anglophone Cameroon. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural sites and attending arranged courses at the University of Buea. Students will prepare a research paper. Coursework is in French. To do coursework in English, students should enroll in WLIT 338 or ETHS 338. Offered as ETHS 338, FRCH 338, and WLIT 338.  Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: FRCH 202.

For more information, please visit the course website

The first 10 undergraduate students who enroll in The Cameroonian Experience (FRCH 338) will receive a $1000 scholarship from the the Eirik Borve Fund for Foreign Language Instruction to go towards their study abroad language program. To be eligible, students must be CWRU undergraduates who have completed the initial study abroad application and submitted their deposit to the Office of Education Abroad. Only students enrolled in the language version of the course where the study abroad program is cross-listed are scholarship eligible. For additional questions, contact the Office of Education Abroad at studyabroad@case.edu

Dates: May 26-June 6, 2018

Session: May Term

Session: Study Abroad

Time: TBA

Instructor: Gilbert Doho

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, Study Abroad

HSTY 124: Sex and the City: Gender & Urban History

Gender is an identity and an experience written onto the spaces of the city. The urban landscape – with its streets, buildings, bridges, parks and squares – shapes and reflects gender identities and sexual relations. This course examines the relationship between gender and urban space from the 19th century to the present, giving special attention to the city of Cleveland. Using Cleveland as our case study, this course will explore some of the many ways in which cities and the inhabitants of cities have been historically sexed, gendered, and sexualized. We will explore the ways in which gender was reflected and constructed by the built environment, as well as how urban space and urban life shaped gender and sexual identities. The course is organized thematically and explores different aspects of city life such as prostitution, urban crime, labor, politics, urban renewal and decay, consumption and leisure and the ways in which sex and gender intersects with these issues. In addition to reading and analyzing secondary and primary sources, we will also experience ourselves how gender is being written onto the urban landscape by walking in the city and going to its museums.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Einav Rabinovitch-Fox

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2018 Summer

HSTY 306/406: History Museums: Theory and Reality

This course is an intensive summer internship (10 hours per week) at the Western Reserve Historical Society, complemented by extensive readings in museum/archival theory and public historical perception. It is designed both to introduce students to museum/archival work and to compare theoretical concepts with actual museum situations. Interns will be assigned a specific project within one of the Society’s curatorial or administrative divisions, but will have the opportunity to work on ancillary tasks throughout the Historical Society’s headquarters in University Circle. Offered as HSTY 306 and HSTY 406.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: Individually arranged

Instructor: John Grabowski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

ITAL 308: The Italian Experience

A three-week summer study abroad course spent at a university in an Italian city well-known for its cultural and linguistic heritage and at other important sites during travel. Focus: Language immersion and processing of cultural experience. Main features: 1. Intense collaboration with an Italian university. Students interact with Italian peers; seminars are co-taught by Italian faculty. 2. Creation of an individual journal that synthesizes students’ perception of and reflections on their experience, records the progress of their final project, and documents their improvement in language proficiency. 3. Final project. Students meet M-F in a formal setting for advanced language study designed to improve proficiency in speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. They attend seminars on varied topics in literature, history, and civilization. Visits to museums, galleries, and attendance at cultural events are included.

For more information, please visit the course website

The first 10 undergraduate students who enroll in Italian Experience (ITAL 308) will receive a $1000 scholarship from the the Eirik Borve Fund for Foreign Language Instruction to go towards their study abroad language program. To be eligible, students must be CWRU undergraduates who have completed the initial study abroad application and submitted their deposit to the Office of Education Abroad. Only students enrolled in the language version of the course where the study abroad program is cross-listed are scholarship eligible. For additional questions, contact the Office of Education Abroad at studyabroad@case.edu.

 

Dates: May 14-18 on Campus; May 22-31 in Italy

Session: May Term

Session: Study Abroad

Time: TBA

Instructor: Denise Caterinacci

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2018 Summer, Study Abroad

MATH 122: Calculus for Science and Engineering II

Continuation of MATH 121. Exponentials and logarithms, growth and decay, inverse trigonometric functions, related rates, basic techniques of integration, area and volume, polar coordinates, parametric equations. Taylor polynomials and Taylor’s theorem.  Prereq: MATH 121, MATH 123 or MATH 126.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 8:45-10:15a

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 125: Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci I

Discrete and continuous probability; differential and integral calculus of one variable; graphing, related rates, maxima and minima. Integration techniques, numerical methods, volumes, areas. Applications to the physical, life, and social sciences. Students planning to take more than two semesters of introductory mathematics should take MATH 121. Recommended preparation: Three and one half years of high school mathematics. Credit for at most one of MATH 121, MATH 123, and MATH 125 can be applied to hours required for graduation. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement. Prereq: MATH 120 or a score of 25 or above on the mathematics diagnostic exam.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 8:45-10:15a

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 126: Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci II

Continuation of MATH 125 covering differential equations, multivariable calculus, discrete methods. Partial derivatives, maxima and minima for functions of two variables, linear regression. Differential equations; first and second order equations, systems, Taylor series methods; Newton’s method; difference equations. Prereq: MATH 121, MATH 123 or MATH 125.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 8:45-10:15a

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 201: Introduction to Linear Algebra for Applications

Matrix operations, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, subspaces, bases and linear independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization of matrices, linear transformations, determinants. Less theoretical than MATH 308. May not be taken for credit by mathematics majors. Only one of MATH 201 or MATH 308 may be taken for credit. Prereq: MATH 122, MATH 124 or MATH 126.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 10:30-11:45a

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 223: Calculus for Science and Engineering III

Introduction to vector algebra; lines and planes. Functions of several variables: partial derivatives, gradients, chain rule, directional derivative, maxima/minima. Multiple integrals, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Derivatives of vector valued functions, velocity and acceleration. Vector fields, line integrals, Green’s theorem. Prereq: MATH 122 or MATH 124.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 9:00-10:15a

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 224: Elementary Differential Equations

A first course in ordinary differential equations. First order equations and applications, linear equations with constant coefficients, linear systems, Laplace transforms, numerical methods of solution. Prereq: MATH 223 or MATH 227.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 9:00-10:15a

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy

Basic problems of philosophy and methods of philosophical thinking. Problems raised by science, morality, religion, politics, and art. Readings from classical and contemporary philosophers. Normally given in multiple sections with different instructors and possibly with different texts. All sections share core materials in theory of knowledge, metaphysics, and ethics despite differences that may exist in emphasis.

Dates: June 4-June 29, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTuWTh 9:30-11:45a

Instructor: Christopher Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHIL 201: Introduction to Logic

Presentation, application, and evaluation of formal methods for determining the validity of arguments. Discussion of the relationship between logic and other disciplines. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Christopher Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHYS 115: Introductory Physics I

First part of a two-semester sequence directed primarily towards students working towards a B.A. in science, with an emphasis on the life sciences. Kinematics; Newton’s laws; gravitation; simple harmonic motion; mechanical waves; fluids; ideal gas law; heat and the first and second laws of thermodynamics. This course has a laboratory component.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 9:30-11:20a; Lab: MW 12:30-3:30p

Instructor: Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 116: Introductory Physics II

Electrostatics, Coulomb’s law, Gauss’s law; capacitance and resistance; DC circuits; magnetic fields; electromagnetic induction; RC and RL circuits; light; geometrical optics; interference and diffraction; special relativity; introduction to quantum mechanics; elements of atomic, nuclear and particle physics. This course has a laboratory component. Prereq: PHYS 115.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: July 9-August 3, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWThF 9:30-11:20a; Lab: MW 12:30-3:30p

Instructor: Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 121: General Physics I – Mechanics

Particle dynamics, Newton’s laws of motion, energy and momentum conservation, rotational motion, and angular momentum conservation. This course has a laboratory component. Recommended preparation: MATH 121 or MATH 123 or MATH 125 or one year of high school calculus.

 

This course is co-taught by Harsh Mathur and Corbin Covault.  The laboratory is taught by Diana Driscoll.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 9:30-11:20a; Lab: TuTh 12:30-3:30p

Instructor: Corbin Covault and Harsh Mathur

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 122: General Physics II – Electricity and Magnetism

Electricity and magnetism, emphasizing the basic electromagnetic laws of Gauss, Ampere, and Faraday. Maxwell’s equations and electromagnetic waves, interference, and diffraction. This course has a laboratory component. Prereq: PHYS 121 or PHYS 123. Prereq or Coreq: MATH 122 or MATH 124 or MATH 126.

 

This course is co-taught by Harsh Mathur and Corbin Covault.  The laboratory is taught by Diana Driscoll.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: July 9-August 3, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWThF 9:30-11:20a; Lab: TuTh 12:30-3:30p

Instructor: Corbin Covault and Harsh Mathur

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PSCL 101: General Psychology

Methods, research, and theories of psychology. Basic research from such areas as psychophysiology, sensation, perception, development, memory, learning, psychopathology, and social psychology.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 10:30a-12:35p

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 282: Quantitative Methods in Psychology

The theory and application of basic methods used in the analysis of psychological data. Not available for credit to students who have completed STAT 201 or ANTH 319. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuTh 1:00-3:30p

Instructor: Arin Connell

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 313: Psychology of Personality

The development and organization of personality; theories of personality and methods for assessing the person; problems of personal adjustment.

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuTh 9:00-11:30a

Instructor: Heath Demaree

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 321: Abnormal Psychology

Major syndromes of mental disorders, their principal symptoms, dynamics, etiology, and treatment. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuW 9:00-11:30a

Instructor: Amy Przeworski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 357: Cognitive Psychology

How individuals encode, store, organize, and use information. Pattern recognition, attention, memory, and problem solving. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 4:30-6:35p

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, Psychological Sciences

PSCL 375: Research Design and Analysis

Conceptual and methodological issues confronted by the behavioral scientist conducting research. Major experimental designs and statistical procedures. Intuitive understanding of the mathematical operations. Recommended preparation: PSCL 282. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuW 1:00-3:30p

Instructor: Amy Przeworski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

RLGN 215: Religion in America

This course is an introduction to American religions, with a particular focus on religious diversity in the United States. As we examine the myriad beliefs and practices of America’s religious communities, we will pay close attention to how religion and culture have shaped each other from the 1600s to today.

To explore the theme of religious diversity, we will take advantage of Cleveland’s rich religious history with visits to local religious institutions and historical sites, including churches, mosques, new religious communities, and Hindu and Buddhist temples. Along the way we will consider the role of religious spaces and institutions in shaping identity and community in our region and beyond.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Brian Clites

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Religious Studies

SOCI 113: Critical Problems in Modern Society

Focus is on major social problems present in large, complex, industrial societies. Topics include environmental problems, poverty, drug addiction, social deviance, and alienation.

Dates: June 4-June 29, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TuWTh 1:00-4:00p

Instructor: Jessica Kelley

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SOCI 208: Dating, Marriage and Family

What is the family today? How has it changed over the last century? How will it change in the future? This course aims to answer these questions as it explores the influences of work, education, government, health and religion on today’s changing families. The course considers the factors that affect mate selection. It also examines parenting, roles of husbands and wives, and family dysfunction, and divorce.

 

 

Dates: July 9-August 3, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 10:30a-12:45p

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SOCI 250: Law and Society: Law, Rights and Policy

How does the U.S. legal system “work”? How does a judge make a decision? Do rights matter? Do human rights work the same way? Class participants will examine how rights, including human rights, fit in the legal system and society. We will ask how legal actors, like judges and lawyers, think about rights compared to non-lawyers. Class participants will observe court hearings in a Federal District Court, an Ohio Appellate Court, as well as local small claims court. We will benefit from hearing experts, local, national, and international, discuss how “law” works and whether rights are useful to making change.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Brian Gran

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SPAN 306/406: The Cuban Experience

This is a three week study-abroad intensive course that takes place at Editorial Vigía, in Matanzas, Cuba. The course combines the unique advantages of a total immersion environment in Spanish with a classroom curriculum that includes conversation practice and study of relevant cultural, literary and historical issues. Students complete three hours of classroom instruction and an hour and a half of publishing workshop four days per week. In this workshop, they work in the edition of a bilingual book. In addition, they participate in organized visits to historic sites and museums connected to the culture curriculum. The focus of the culture curriculum is the study of Cuban history and culture through its literature, visual arts, films, and music. After applying and being accepted in the program, students meet for personal advising with the program director and attend four different one hour orientation-information meetings in the spring semester. After successful completion of the study-abroad program, students receive 3 upper-level credits in Spanish. The course is interdisciplinary in approach and provides students with the tools they need to analyze and understand the complexities of modern Cuba. Students will have formal classes taught by their professor and talks and meetings with specialists on Cuban literature, art, architecture, history and other aspects of culture and society. In addition, they will attend lectures, participate in discussions, and take field trips that will expose them to many aspects of Cuban culture, such as art, architecture, music, dance, film, literature, artisan work, folklore, history and urban growth. Offered as SPAN 306SPAN 406, and ETHS 306. Prereq: SPAN 202.

For more information, please visit the course website

The first 10 undergraduate students who enroll in The Cuban Experience (SPAN 306) will receive a $1000 scholarship from the the Eirik Borve Fund for Foreign Language Instruction to go towards their study abroad language program. To be eligible, students must be CWRU undergraduates who have completed the initial study abroad application and submitted their deposit to the Office of Education Abroad. Only students enrolled in the language version of the course where the study abroad program is cross-listed are scholarship eligible. For additional questions, contact the Office of Education Abroad at studyabroad@case.edu.

Dates: July 8-July 29, 2018

Session: Study Abroad

Time: TBA

Instructor: Damaris Punales-Alpizar

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, Study Abroad

STAT 312: Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science

For advanced undergraduate students in engineering, physical sciences, life sciences. Comprehensive introduction to probability models and statistical methods of analyzing data with the object of formulating statistical models and choosing appropriate methods for inference from experimental and observational data and for testing the model’s validity. Balanced approach with equal emphasis on probability, fundamental concepts of statistics, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, design of experiments, and regression modeling. Note: Credit given for only one (1) of STAT 312, STAT 313, STAT 333, STAT 433. Prereq: MATH 122 or equivalent.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MTuW 4:00-6:00p

Instructor: Wojbor Woyczynski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

THTR 100: Introduction to Acting

A course designed to provide the non-major or undeclared liberal arts major experience with a basic understanding of acting and performance. Fundamentals in improvisation, vocabulary, and scene study are stressed. This course fulfills THTR 101 or THTR 102 should the undeclared student select theater as his or her major or minor. Students may receive credit for only one of THTR 100, THTR 101, or THTR 102.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MW 6:00-9:00p

Instructor: Christopher Bohan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Theater

THTR 206: Mr. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang: James Bond and Popular Culture

The twenty-one films of James Bond have become part of popular culture, and the figure of the superspy has become mythic in proportion. This series, from its first installment in 1963 to the latest reinvention of James Bond in 2006, not only depicts one dashing man’s efforts to save the world from disaster again and again, but also traces the development of our popular culture. Issues of violence, sex, the presentation and treatment of women, racial stereotypes, and spectacle among other topics can be discussed after viewing each film, providing an opportunity to explore the changing expectations of American audiences and the developing form of contemporary cinema. Students who have taken USSO 286D may not receive credit for this class.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MW 9:30a-1:00p; TuThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Jeffrey Ullom

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Theater

UNIV 300: Premedical Concepts and Review: MCAT Preparation

This course is designed to comprehensively review all Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) content areas, as well as testing methods, and hone the skills students need to improve performance on the MCAT. This course will be team taught to include faculty expertise in biochemistry, biology, chemistry, English, mathematics, physics, psychological sciences, and sociology. Critical analysis and reasoning skills will be emphasized. Students will gain practice working on MCAT questions that test knowledge and critical thinking. Faculty will provide directed feedback to students to assist them in their test taking strategies.  Completion of introductory courses in all subject areas above is strongly recommended before taking this review course.

The MCAT is administered by the AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges). Course materials include sample questions, two practice exams, and other materials from the AAMC.

May Term: 5/14 – 6/1, MTWRF, 9:30am – 1:00pm

View this course in the Schedule of Classes here.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-1:00p

Instructor: Rebecca Benard, Susan Burden-Gulley, Greg Tochtrop, T. Kenney Fountain, Diana Driscoll, Arin Connell, Jessica Kelly, Jill Korbin

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, Chemistry, English, New 2018 Summer, Physics, Psychological Sciences, Sociology

USNA 285: The Science of Madness: An Historical Investigation of Mental Illness

Since antiquity the western world’s understanding of mental illness has continued to evolve. This course will examine the trajectory of that evolution, looking at the medical theories that have influenced assumptions about the causes and treatments of mental illness from the early modern era through the twenty-first century. Examples of questions we will investigate include: How we have defined the normal and the pathological in human mental behavior over time? How do we explain the centuries-old correlation that medicine has made between creativity and mental illness? Which past and present psychiatric treatments have been beneficial and which harmful? How did Darwin’s theory of evolution affect theories of mental illness (and how does it continue to do so with the advent of evolutionary psychology)? How have changing philosophies of science affected the research and practice of psychology? How and why do the sciences of the mind–psychiatry, psychoanalysis, clinical psychology, psychopharmacology, the cognitive neurosciences–claim so much scientific authority and exert influence over our lives today? As a frame work for this inquiry, the class will use the concept of paradigm shifts as Thomas Kuhn defines in his classic work, the Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Prereq: Passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSNA, FSCC, FSSO, FSSY or FSCS. Prereq or Coreq: FSTS 100.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 4:00-5:30p

Instructor: Barbara Burgess-Van Aken

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USNA 287S: Society and Natural Resource

The relationship between humans and the natural world can be defined in large part by how societies manage natural resources. In this seminar, students will analyze how society-environment interactions have undergone substantial shifts over time…from John Locke’s Labor Theory of Value and the rise of utilitarian conservation to more recent approaches based on ecosystem management that emphasize ecological integrity and stakeholder collaboration. Course readings will challenge students to think critically about how humans conceptualize and impact the environment. Class time will be spent discussing the evolution of effective human-ecological systems interactions as outlined in the readings, as well as reviewing student reflection papers that connect course concepts to real word scenarios. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TR 6:00-8:30p

Instructor: Scott Hardy

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, SAGES

USSO 288C: Green Transformation and Globalization

This seminar introduces students to the recent major green transformation in China and elsewhere in the world, focusing on the way the green changes took place in relation to globalization, environment and climate protection, technology innovation, income redistribution, domestic consumption, and education, to meet the challenges of financial crisis, climate change, energy insecurity, and international competition. The seminar will also assess the impacts of various aspects of green transformation and globalization on today’s and future world and vice versa. This seminar promotes broad knowledge of-and increased appreciation of the importance of diversity in China’s cultural past, social frameworks, economic conditions, and natural environment. In a close connection to the primary readings, which include several recent relevant works, the students will be exposed to a variety of related primary and secondary materials (such as texts, photos, film clips, music, songs, and websites). In addition to receiving informative yet concise instruction, the student will also be involved in practice in critical reading and thinking, in writing and orally presenting research papers. In these activities, the students will be introduced to basic methods and concepts critical to the understanding of important economic, social, and cultural developments and changes as products of movements rather than isolated incidents. Prereq: Passing letter grade in a first year seminar in FSCC, FSNA, FSSY or FSCS. Prereq or Coreq: FSTS 100. Requisites not met permission required if previous course completion in this subject group.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuTh 2:00-4:20p

Instructor: Peter Yang

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSO 291J: Narratives of Immigration

As one of the most pressing issues of the twenty-first century, immigration has captured the imagination of politicians and authors alike. In this class, we will explore the stories of those who have migrated to the United States. We will analyze how various writers create autobiographical and fictional narratives of migration, addressing issues such as adjusting to different cultures, learning new languages, and adapting to new environments. Through these stories and histories, we will ask broader questions about immigration, including: is migration a basic human right? Is it ethical to define someone as being “illegal” for peacefully working and living in a different country from where they were born? What are the gendered, ethnic, cultural, and racial barriers that exist when migrating between countries? What are the cost(s) of citizenship and embracing a new country as one’s home? As the United States is largely seen as a nation of immigrants, how have immigrants’ stories perpetuated or undermined this reputation?

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MW 6:00-8:30p

Instructor: Cara Byrne

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSY 288I: Diversions: Experimental Stories and New Media

In this course, students will study works in which the authors and artists have experimented with traditional linear forms and created stories that are, for instance, labyrinthine, framed, collaged, geometrical, digressive, and even networked. While both print-based and digital texts offer spaces for diverse and deeply engaging written or visual performances, they also require further critical inquiry into the ways in which they create, reflect, or resist social and cultural values. Our focus in this course will be exploring how stories (and other texts) – in print, on screen, on canvas, in digital formats – that don’t follow or that play with conventional rules of order encourage us to participate in making sense of our contemporary world. The goals of the course include: exploring the relationship between form and content in written and visual productions, developing a critical perspective from which to enjoy, assess, and respond creatively to traditional print and multimedia presentations, and making excellent use of research resources at CWRU and cultural resources at University Circle. In addition, students will work to develop their writing and presentation skills and to innovate novel models of research writing. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWTh 10:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Kristine Kelly

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, SAGES

USSY 289G: The American West on Film

Few geographical areas in the United States contain as many tall tales and mythological figures as the American frontier. From an extreme point of view, the West is the only American myth because no other nation can claim the cowboy, the Native American, or the immigrant worker on the transcontinental railroad. And yet, each of these figures remains spectacularly diverse. We celebrate their variety and lionize their individuality in film, popular novels, and cultural criticism. From the visions of the New World to the conquest of the frontier, the color of the American West proliferates and transforms, defining our culture. In this course, we will investigate how critics have understood our fascination with the Western frontier. The class will broadly explore version of the frontier in novels, films, and historical accounts. Reading about the history of the actual west, the course will then examine how the films of the twentieth century alter history in order to express the fantasies and anxieties of their own time. By studying both history and film, we will be able to interrogate manifest destiny and the myth of American exceptionalism. What makes the West such an integral part of our understanding of America? How has its actual history become myth? What does the American fascination with the cowboy, the Native American, or the outlaw imply about our nation? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuTh 1:00-3:30p

Instructor: Joshua Hoeynck

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSY 293R: Representing the AIDS Crisis

In this course, we will examine how the AIDS Crisis of the 1980s and 1990s was represented in American literature, film, and art, and how authors and artists engaged imaginatively with the Crisis. As we examine a number of works that represent the AIDS Crisis, our inquiry will focus on the following questions: How do activists use literary and artistic works for political and social change? How do artists and writers use and represent activism in their works? More specifically, what role does metaphor play in how HIV/AIDS is understood? What are the ethics of representing the AIDS Crisis? Is it unethical for writers and artists to use tragic events imaginatively?

To answer these questions, we will examine a variety of representations of the Crisis across a number of genres, notably novels, short stories, zines, films, and conceptual art. The texts under examination represent a variety of perspectives on the topic of HIV/AIDS, from activists and artists, members of the LGBTQ community, racial and ethnic minorities, and differing socioeconomic classes. By comparing these genres, we trace the often-conflicting strategies used by authors and artists for representing the AIDS Crisis. Theoretical texts will introduce students to queer perspectives, concepts of testimonial writing and bearing witness to tragic events, the uses of the imagination in creating art and literature, and the functioning of metaphor in art and society.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWTh 2:30-4:00p

Instructor: Michael Chiappini

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, SAGES

WLIT 308/408: The Paris Experience

Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Paris. The focus of the course is the literature and culture of the African, Arab, and Asian communities of Paris. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural centers and museums and interviewing authors and students about the immigrant experience. Assigned readings complement course activities. Students enrolled in FRCH 308/408 do coursework in French. WLIT 308/408 students have the option of completing coursework in English. Graduate students have additional course requirements. Offered as FRCH 308, WLIT 308, FRCH 408, and WLIT 408. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

For more information, please visit the course website

Dates: May 13-June 2, 2018

Session: May Term

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: Cheryl Toman

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Study Abroad, World Literature

WLIT 338: The Cameroonian Experience

Immersion learning experience living and studying in Cameroon. The focus of the course is the culture, literature, and language of Francophone Cameroon, with some emphasis on Anglophone Cameroon. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural sites and attending arranged courses at the University of Buea. Students will prepare a research paper. Coursework is in French. To do coursework in English, students should enroll in WLIT 338 or ETHS 338. Offered as ETHS 338, FRCH 338, and WLIT 338.  Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: FRCH 202

For more information, please visit the course website

Dates: May 26-June 6, 2018

Session: May Term

Session: Study Abroad

Time: TBA

Instructor: Gilbert Doho

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Study Abroad, World Literature

Page last modified: September 11, 2018