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ANTH 102: Being Human: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

The nature of culture and humans as culture-bearing animals. The range of cultural phenomena including language, social organization, religion, and culture change, and the relevance of anthropology for contemporary social, economic, and ecological problems.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Jing Wang

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2018 Summer

ANTH 335: Illegal Drugs and Society

This course provides perspectives on illegal drug use informed by the social, political and economic dimensions of the issues. Framed by the history, epidemiology, and medical consequences of drug use, students will confront the complex challenges posed by addiction. Anthropological research conducted in the U.S. and cross-culturally will demonstrate, elaborate and juxtapose various clinical, public health, and law enforcement policies and perspectives. Topics examined will include: why exclusively using a bio-medical model of addiction is inadequate; how effective is the war on drugs; what prevention, intervention and treatment efforts work; and various ideological/moral perspectives on illegal drug use.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MW 10:30a-1:30p

Instructor: Allison Schlosser

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2018 Summer

ARTH 241: Medieval Art

This course will introduce students to the pivotal works of art created between approximately 250 and 1500. We will discuss painting, sculpture, architecture, manuscript illumination, and graphic arts. Medieval visual and material culture will be considered within the framework of socio-political developments, rapid urban growth, the flowering of monastic culture, the rise of universities, and changes in devotional practices. While the course will primarily focus on western part of the medieval Christendom, we will also discuss Jewish, Byzantine, and Islamic art. Course will be held at the Cleveland Museum of Art.  Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 10:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Gilbert Jones

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Art History and Art

ARTS 399: Independent Study in Art Studio

Independent Study in Art Studio; by permit of Director only. Contact Tim Shuckerow.

Class meets at Squire Valleevue Farm, lower farm.

Dates: June 4-June 29, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTuWThF 10:30a-3:00p

Instructor: Tim Shuckerow

Credits: 1-3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

ARTS 399: Independent Study Photo

Independent Study Photo; by permit of Director only. Contact Tim Shuckerow.

Class meets at Squire Valleevue Farm, lower farm.

Dates: June 5-July 31, 2018

Time: TuTh 6:00-9:00p

Instructor: Tim Shuckerow

Credits: 1-3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

ARTS 497: Summer Workshop in Art Education

A current art education issue is covered in depth.

Class meets at Squire Valleevue Farm, lower farm.

Dates: June 4-June 29, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTuWThF 10:30a-3:00p

Instructor: Tim Shuckerow

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

BIOL 214: Genes, Ecology and Evolution

First in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on DNA and RNA); mitotic and meiotic cell cycles, gene expression, genetics, population genetics, evolution, biological diversity and ecology. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 111.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Deborah Harris

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 214L: Genes, Ecology and Evolution Laboratory

First in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (with a focus on DNA and RNA); basics of cell structure (with a focus on malaria research); molecular genetics, biotechnology; population genetics and evolution, ecology. Assignments will be in the form of a scientific journal submission. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 214.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Deborah Harris

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 215: Cells and Proteins

Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on membranes, energy conversion organelles and cytoskeleton); protein structure-function; enzyme kinetics, cellular energetics, and cell communication and motility strategies. Prereq: BIOL 214 and (CHEM 105 or CHEM 111). Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 106 or ENGR 145.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Dianne Kube

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 215L: Cells and Proteins Laboratory

Second in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics to include: protein structure-function, enzymes kinetics; cell structure; cellular energetics, respiration and photosynthesis. In addition, membrane structure and transport will be covered. Laboratory and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. This course is not available for students who have taken BIOL 215 as a 4-credit course. Prereq: BIOL 214L and Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 215.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 216: Development and Physiology

This is the final class in the series of three courses required of the Biology major. As with the two previous courses, BIOL 214 and 215, this course is designed to provide an overview of fundamental biological processes. It will examine the complexity of interactions controlling reproduction, development and physiological function in animals. The Developmental Biology section will review topics such as gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, the genetic control of development, stem cells and cloning. Main topics included in the Physiology portion consist of: homeostasis, the function of neurons and nervous systems; the major organ systems and processes involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, temperature regulation, endocrine function and the immunologic response.  Prereq: BIOL 214.

 

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 216L: Development and Physiology Laboratory

Third in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Students will conduct laboratory experiments designed to provide hands-on, empirical laboratory experience in order to better understand the complex interactions governing the basic physiology and development of organisms. Laboratories and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. Prereq: BIOL 214L. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 216.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

CHEM 106: Principles of Chemistry II

Thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium; acid/base chemistry; oxidation and reduction; kinetics; spectroscopy; introduction to nuclear, organic, inorganic, and polymer chemistry. Prereq: CHEM 105 or equivalent.

Dates: July 9-August 3, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 10:30a-12:40p

Instructor: Rekha Srinivasan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 113: Principles of Chemistry Laboratory

A one semester laboratory based on quantitative chemical measurements. Experiments include analysis, synthesis and characterization, thermochemistry and chemical kinetics. Computer analysis of data is a key part of all experiments. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or ENGR 145. A one semester laboratory based on quantitative chemical measurements. Experiments include analysis, synthesis and characterization, thermochemistry and chemical kinetics. Computer analysis of data is a key part of all experiments. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or ENGR 145.

Dates: July 9-August 3, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 1:00p-5:00p

Instructor: Drew Meyer

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 223: Introductory Organic Chemistry I

Introductory course for science majors and engineering students. Develops themes of structure and bonding along with elementary reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers as well as an introduction to spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111.

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWThF 10:30a-12:20p

Instructor: Raul E. Juarez Hernandez

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 224: Introductory Organic Chemistry II

Continues and extends themes of structure and bonding from CHEM 223 and continues spectroscopy and more complex reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of aromatic rings, carbonyl compounds, amines, and selected special topics. Prereq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

Dates: July 9-August 3, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWThF 10:30a-12:20p

Instructor: Krista Cunningham

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 233: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 and CHEM 113 or equivalent. Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323. An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 and CHEM 113 or equivalent. Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 1:00p-5:00p

Instructor: Krista Cunningham

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 234: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

A continuation of CHEM 233, involving multi-step organic synthesis, peptide synthesis, product purification and analysis using sophisticated analytical techniques such as chromatography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 233. Coreq: CHEM 224

Dates: July 9-August 3, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 1:00-5:00p

Instructor: Gregory Tochtrop

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 328/428: Introductory Biochemistry

A survey of biochemistry with a strong emphasis on the chemical logic underlying metabolic pathways and the evolution of biomolecules. Cellular architecture. Amino acids and protein structure, purification, analysis, and synthesis. DNA, RNA, the flow of genetic information, and molecular biological technology. Enzyme kinetics, catalytic, and regulatory strategies. Sugars, complex carbohydrates, and glycoproteins. Lipids and cell membranes. Glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, carbon fixation through the “dark reactions” of photosynthesis, aerobic catabolism through the citric acid cycle, and glycogen metabolism. Biosynthesis and degradation of fatty acids, amino acids, and proteins. Offered as CHEM 328 and CHEM 428. Prereq: CHEM 224 or CHEM 324.

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 10:30a-12:20p

Instructor: Rekha Srinivasan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

COSI 406: Academic English Proficiency Speech Production

TBD

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TBD

Instructor: Angela Ciccia

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, Psychological Sciences

HSTY 306/406: History Museums: Theory and Reality

This course is an intensive summer internship (10 hours per week) at the Western Reserve Historical Society, complemented by extensive readings in museum/archival theory and public historical perception. It is designed both to introduce students to museum/archival work and to compare theoretical concepts with actual museum situations. Interns will be assigned a specific project within one of the Society’s curatorial or administrative divisions, but will have the opportunity to work on ancillary tasks throughout the Historical Society’s headquarters in University Circle. Offered as HSTY 306 and HSTY 406.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: Individually arranged

Instructor: John Grabowski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

MATH 122: Calculus for Science and Engineering II

Continuation of MATH 121. Exponentials and logarithms, growth and decay, inverse trigonometric functions, related rates, basic techniques of integration, area and volume, polar coordinates, parametric equations. Taylor polynomials and Taylor’s theorem.  Prereq: MATH 121, MATH 123 or MATH 126.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 8:45-10:15a

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 125: Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci I

Discrete and continuous probability; differential and integral calculus of one variable; graphing, related rates, maxima and minima. Integration techniques, numerical methods, volumes, areas. Applications to the physical, life, and social sciences. Students planning to take more than two semesters of introductory mathematics should take MATH 121. Recommended preparation: Three and one half years of high school mathematics. Credit for at most one of MATH 121, MATH 123, and MATH 125 can be applied to hours required for graduation. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement. Prereq: MATH 120 or a score of 25 or above on the mathematics diagnostic exam.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWF 8:45-10:15a

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 126: Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci II

Continuation of MATH 125 covering differential equations, multivariable calculus, discrete methods. Partial derivatives, maxima and minima for functions of two variables, linear regression. Differential equations; first and second order equations, systems, Taylor series methods; Newton’s method; difference equations. Prereq: MATH 121, MATH 123 or MATH 125.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWF 8:45-10:15a

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 201: Introduction to Linear Algebra for Applications

Matrix operations, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, subspaces, bases and linear independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization of matrices, linear transformations, determinants. Less theoretical than MATH 308. May not be taken for credit by mathematics majors. Only one of MATH 201 or MATH 308 may be taken for credit. Prereq: MATH 122, MATH 124 or MATH 126.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWF 10:30-11:45a

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 223: Calculus for Science and Engineering III

Introduction to vector algebra; lines and planes. Functions of several variables: partial derivatives, gradients, chain rule, directional derivative, maxima/minima. Multiple integrals, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Derivatives of vector valued functions, velocity and acceleration. Vector fields, line integrals, Green’s theorem. Prereq: MATH 122 or MATH 124.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWF 9:00-10:15a

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 224: Elementary Differential Equations

A first course in ordinary differential equations. First order equations and applications, linear equations with constant coefficients, linear systems, Laplace transforms, numerical methods of solution. Prereq: MATH 223 or MATH 227.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTuWF 9:00-10:15a

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

PHYS 115: Introductory Physics I

First part of a two-semester sequence directed primarily towards students working towards a B.A. in science, with an emphasis on the life sciences. Kinematics; Newton’s laws; gravitation; simple harmonic motion; mechanical waves; fluids; ideal gas law; heat and the first and second laws of thermodynamics. This course has a laboratory component.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 9:30-11:20a; Lab: MW 12:30-3:30p

Instructor: Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHYS 116: Introductory Physics II

Electrostatics, Coulomb’s law, Gauss’s law; capacitance and resistance; DC circuits; magnetic fields; electromagnetic induction; RC and RL circuits; light; geometrical optics; interference and diffraction; special relativity; introduction to quantum mechanics; elements of atomic, nuclear and particle physics. This course has a laboratory component. Prereq: PHYS 115.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: July 9-August 3, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWThF 9:30-11:20a; Lab: MW 12:30-3:30p

Instructor: Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 121: General Physics I – Mechanics

Particle dynamics, Newton’s laws of motion, energy and momentum conservation, rotational motion, and angular momentum conservation. This course has a laboratory component. Recommended preparation: MATH 121 or MATH 123 or MATH 125 or one year of high school calculus.

 

This course is co-taught by Harsh Mathur and Corbin Covault.  The laboratory is taught by Diana Driscoll.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: June 4-July 6, 2018

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTuWTh 9:30-11:20a; Lab: TuTh 12:30-3:30p

Instructor: Corbin Covault and Harsh Mathur

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 122: General Physics II – Electricity and Magnetism

Electricity and magnetism, emphasizing the basic electromagnetic laws of Gauss, Ampere, and Faraday. Maxwell’s equations and electromagnetic waves, interference, and diffraction. This course has a laboratory component. Prereq: PHYS 121 or PHYS 123. Prereq or Coreq: MATH 122 or MATH 124 or MATH 126.

 

This course is co-taught by Harsh Mathur and Corbin Covault.  The laboratory is taught by Diana Driscoll.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: July 9-August 3, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWThF 9:30-11:20a; Lab: TuTh 12:30-3:30p

Instructor: Corbin Covault and Harsh Mathur

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PSCL 101: General Psychology I

Methods, research, and theories of psychology. Basic research from such areas as psychophysiology, sensation, perception, development, memory, learning, psychopathology, and social psychology.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 10:30a-12:35p

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 357: Cognitive Psychology

How individuals encode, store, organize, and use information. Pattern recognition, attention, memory, and problem solving. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 4:30-6:35p

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, Psychological Sciences

SOCI 113: Critical Problems in Modern Society

Focus is on major social problems present in large, complex, industrial societies. Topics include environmental problems, poverty, drug addiction, social deviance, and alienation.

Dates: June 4-June 29, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TuWTh 1:00-4:00p

Instructor: Jessica Kelley-Moore

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SOCI 208: Dating, Marriage and Family

What is the family today? How has it changed over the last century? How will it change in the future? This course aims to answer these questions as it explores the influences of work, education, government, health and religion on today’s changing families. The course considers the factors that affect mate selection. It also examines parenting, roles of husbands and wives, and family dysfunction, and divorce.

 

 

Dates: July 9-August 3, 2018

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTuWTh 10:30a-12:45p

Instructor: TBD

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SOCI 250: Law and Society: Law, Rights and Policy

How does the U.S. legal system “work”? How does a judge make a decision? Do rights matter? Do human rights work the same way? Class participants will examine how rights, including human rights, fit in the legal system and society. We will ask how legal actors, like judges and lawyers, think about rights compared to non-lawyers. Class participants will observe court hearings in a Federal District Court, an Ohio Appellate Court, as well as local small claims court. We will benefit from hearing experts, local, national, and international, discuss how “law” works and whether rights are useful to making change.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MTuWThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Brian Gran

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

STAT 312: Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science

For advanced undergraduate students in engineering, physical sciences, life sciences. Comprehensive introduction to probability models and statistical methods of analyzing data with the object of formulating statistical models and choosing appropriate methods for inference from experimental and observational data and for testing the model’s validity. Balanced approach with equal emphasis on probability, fundamental concepts of statistics, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, design of experiments, and regression modeling. Note: Credit given for only one (1) of STAT 312, STAT 313, STAT 333, STAT 433. Prereq: MATH 122 or equivalent.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MTuW 4:00-6:00p

Instructor: Wojbor Woyczynski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

THTR 100: Introduction to Acting

A course designed to provide the non-major or undeclared liberal arts major experience with a basic understanding of acting and performance. Fundamentals in improvisation, vocabulary, and scene study are stressed. This course fulfills THTR 101 or THTR 102 should the undeclared student select theater as his or her major or minor. Students may receive credit for only one of THTR 100, THTR 101, or THTR 102.

Dates: June 18-July 30, 2018

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MW 6:00-9:00p

Instructor: Christopher Bohan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Theater

THTR 206: Mr. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang: James Bond and Popular Culture

The twenty-one films of James Bond have become part of popular culture, and the figure of the superspy has become mythic in proportion. This series, from its first installment in 1963 to the latest reinvention of James Bond in 2006, not only depicts one dashing man’s efforts to save the world from disaster again and again, but also traces the development of our popular culture. Issues of violence, sex, the presentation and treatment of women, racial stereotypes, and spectacle among other topics can be discussed after viewing each film, providing an opportunity to explore the changing expectations of American audiences and the developing form of contemporary cinema. Students who have taken USSO 286D may not receive credit for this class.

Dates: May 14-June 1, 2018

Session: May Term

Time: MW 9:30a-1:00p; TuThF 9:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Jeffrey Ullom

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Theater

Page last modified: November 21, 2016