Shopping cart

close
close

All Courses


ANTH 102: Being Human: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

The nature of culture and humans as culture-bearing animals. The range of cultural phenomena including language, social organization, religion, and culture change, and the relevance of anthropology for contemporary social, economic, and ecological problems.

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Vanessa Hildebrand

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Anthropology

ANTH 215: Health, Culture, and Disease: An Introduction to Medical Anthropology

This course is an introduction to the field of Medical Anthropology. Medical Anthropology is concerned with the cross-cultural study of culture, health, and illness. During the course of the semester, our survey will include (1) theoretical orientations and key concepts; (2) the cross-cultural diversity of health beliefs and practices (abroad and at home); and (3) contemporary issues and special populations (e.g., AIDS, homelessness, refugees, women’s health, and children at risk).

Dates: June 3-June 28, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MWF 9:30-12:25

Instructor: Vanessa Hildebrand

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Anthropology, New 2019 Summer

ARTH 101: Art History I: Pyramids to Pagodas

The first half of a two-semester survey of world art highlighting the major monuments of the ancient Mediterranean, medieval Europe, MesoAmerica, Africa, and Asia. Special emphasis on visual analysis, and socio-cultural contexts, and objects in the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 10:30-12:00

Instructor: Russell Green

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, New 2019 Summer

ARTS 220: Photography I

Camera, film, and darkroom techniques. Development of basic black and white perceptual and photographic skills. Darkroom and photographic field and lab work. 35mm camera required.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TR 1:00-4:00

Instructor: Jerry Birchfield

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

ARTS 286: Introduction to Video Game Design

Game design creates meaningful play through interactive experiences. This introductory studio-based course explores games through the development and creation of 2D video games. The course aims to provide a critical vocabulary and historical context for analyzing games and gaming theory and focuses on the skills and techniques necessary to develop 2D video games.

Dates: June 17-July 29, 2019

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MW 4:00-6:55

Instructor: Jared Bendis

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio

ARTS 305/405: Study Abroad: Architecture, Design & Culture

This 4-week intensive Paris, France summer course immerses students into a culture that solves design and architectural problems through a sophisticated appreciation for design, aesthetics, and conceptualization. The program introduces students to critical inquiry through shared principles and theories of art, architecture, and design as experienced in one of Europe’s culture capitals. Using the city as our classroom, students will visit well-known sites, museums, and monuments, as well as hidden gems that reinforce concepts presented in readings, lectures, and class discussions.

For more information, please visit the course website

Dates: May 20-June 17, 2019

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: Sally Levine

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Art History and Art, Art Studio, Study Abroad

ASTR 105: Introduction to Einstein’s Universe

This course is a descriptive introduction for the non-science major to Einstein’s Special and General Theories of Relativity and how these theories have fundamentally altered our understanding of the universe. Topics discussed will include: time dilation, length contraction, the twin paradox, the warping of space-time, white dwarf stars, neutron stars, black holes, the structure and evolution of the universe. No mathematical background beyond simple algebra is needed. This course has no pre-requisites.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 10:30 -12:00

Instructor: Jeffrey Kriessler

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Astronomy, New 2019 Summer

BIOL 214: Genes, Ecology and Evolution

First in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on DNA and RNA); mitotic and meiotic cell cycles, gene expression, genetics, population genetics, evolution, biological diversity and ecology. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 111.

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 10:00-12:30

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 214L: Genes, Ecology and Evolution Laboratory

First in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (with a focus on DNA and RNA); basics of cell structure (with a focus on malaria research); molecular genetics, biotechnology; population genetics and evolution, ecology. Assignments will be in the form of a scientific journal submission. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 214.

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MW 1:00-2:00; TR 1:00-4:00

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 215: Cells and Proteins

Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on membranes, energy conversion organelles and cytoskeleton); protein structure-function; enzyme kinetics, cellular energetics, and cell communication and motility strategies. Prereq: BIOL 214 and (CHEM 105 or CHEM 111). Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 106 or ENGR 145.

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:00-11:30

Instructor: Valerie Haywood

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 215: Cells and Proteins

Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on membranes, energy conversion organelles and cytoskeleton); protein structure-function; enzyme kinetics, cellular energetics, and cell communication and motility strategies. Prereq: BIOL 214 and (CHEM 105 or CHEM 111). Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 106 or ENGR 145.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:00-11:45

Instructor: Dianne Kube

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 215L: Cells and Proteins Laboratory

Second in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics to include: protein structure-function, enzymes kinetics; cell structure; cellular energetics, respiration and photosynthesis. In addition, membrane structure and transport will be covered. Laboratory and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. This course is not available for students who have taken BIOL 215 as a 4-credit course. Prereq: BIOL 214L and Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 215.

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MW 12:30-1:30; TR 12:30-3:30

Instructor: Valerie Haywood

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 215L: Cells and Proteins Laboratory

Second in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics to include: protein structure-function, enzymes kinetics; cell structure; cellular energetics, respiration and photosynthesis. In addition, membrane structure and transport will be covered. Laboratory and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. This course is not available for students who have taken BIOL 215 as a 4-credit course. Prereq: BIOL 214L and Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 215.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: TR 1:00-4:00

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 216: Development and Physiology

This is the final class in the series of three courses required of the Biology major. As with the two previous courses, BIOL 214 and 215, this course is designed to provide an overview of fundamental biological processes. It will examine the complexity of interactions controlling reproduction, development and physiological function in animals. The Developmental Biology section will review topics such as gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, the genetic control of development, stem cells and cloning. Main topics included in the Physiology portion consist of: homeostasis, the function of neurons and nervous systems; the major organ systems and processes involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, temperature regulation, endocrine function and the immunologic response.  Prereq: BIOL 214.

 

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:00-11:30

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 216: Development and Physiology – Hybrid

This is the final class in the series of three courses required of the Biology major. As with the two previous courses, BIOL 214 and 215, this course is designed to provide an overview of fundamental biological processes. It will examine the complexity of interactions controlling reproduction, development and physiological function in animals. The Developmental Biology section will review topics such as gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, the genetic control of development, stem cells and cloning. Main topics included in the Physiology portion consist of: homeostasis, the function of neurons and nervous systems; the major organ systems and processes involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, temperature regulation, endocrine function and the immunologic response. There are two instructional modes for this course: lecture mode and hybrid mode. In the lecture mode students attend class for their instruction. In the hybrid mode students watch online lectures from the course instructor and attend discussion sections with the course instructor. The online content prepares students for the discussions.  The total student effort and course content is identical for both instructional modes. Either instructional mode fulfills the BIOL 216 requirement for the BA and BS in Biology. Prereq: BIOL 214.

*This section of BIOL 216 will be taught in the hybrid model. Due to the accelerated nature of the 5-week summer term, students are required to attend class every day (M-Th).*

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:00-11:45

Instructor: Rebecca Benard

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 216L: Development and Physiology Laboratory

Third in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Students will conduct laboratory experiments designed to provide hands-on, empirical laboratory experience in order to better understand the complex interactions governing the basic physiology and development of organisms. Laboratories and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. Prereq: BIOL 214L. Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 216.

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MW 12:30-1:30; TR 12:30-3:30

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 1 credit

Department: Biology

BIOL 302: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does the human brain learn?” Through assigned readings, extensive class discussions, and a major paper, each student will explore personal perspectives on learning. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: the brain’s cycle of learning; neocortex structure and function; emotion and limbic brain; synapse dynamics and changes in learning; images in cognition; symbolic brain (language, mathematics, music); memory formation; and creative thought and brain mechanisms. The major paper will be added to each student’s SAGES writing portfolio. In addition, near the end of the semester, each student will make an oral presentation on a chosen topic. Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 9:00-11:30

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 312: Introductory Plant Biology

This course will provide an overview of plant biology. Topics covered will include: (1) Plant structure, function and development from the cellular level to the whole plant (2) plant diversity, evolution of the bacteria, fungi, algae, bryophytes and vascular plants; (3) adaptations to their environment, plant-animal interactions, and human uses of plants. Prerequisite: (Undergraduate student and BIOL 215) or Requisites Not Met permission.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:00-11:45

Instructor: Leena Chakravarty

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

BIOL 336/436: Aquatic Biology

Physical, chemical, and biological dynamics of lake ecosystems. Factors governing the distribution, abundance, and diversity of freshwater organisms.
This course satisfies the Population Biology/Ecology breadth requirement of the B.A. and B.S. in Biology.
Offered as BIOL 336 and BIOL 436. Prerequisite: Undergraduate Student and BIOL 214 or Requisites Not Met permission

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 10:00-12:30

Instructor: Deborah Harris

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Biology, New 2019 Summer

BIOL 343/443: Microbiology

The physiology, genetics, biochemistry, and diversity of microorganisms. The subject will be approached both as a basic biological science that studies the molecular and biochemical processes of cells and viruses, and as an applied science that examines the involvement of microorganisms in human disease as well as in workings of ecosystems, plant symbioses, and industrial processes. The course is divided into four major areas: bacteria, viruses, medical microbiology, and environmental and applied microbiology. Offered as BIOL 343 and BIOL 443. Prereq: BIOL 215 or BIOL 250.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 1:00-2:45

Instructor: Dianne Kube

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Biology

CHEM 105: Principles of Chemistry I

Atomic structure; thermochemistry; periodicity, bonding and molecular structure; intermolecular forces; properties of solids; liquids, gases and solutions. Recommended preparation: One year of high school chemistry.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:30-12:20

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 106: Principles of Chemistry II

Thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium; acid/base chemistry; oxidation and reduction; kinetics; spectroscopy; introduction to nuclear, organic, inorganic, and polymer chemistry. Prereq: CHEM 105 or equivalent.

Dates: July 9-August 2, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 10:30-12:40

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 113: Principles of Chemistry Laboratory

A one semester laboratory based on quantitative chemical measurements. Experiments include analysis, synthesis and characterization, thermochemistry and chemical kinetics. Computer analysis of data is a key part of all experiments. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or ENGR 145. A one semester laboratory based on quantitative chemical measurements. Experiments include analysis, synthesis and characterization, thermochemistry and chemical kinetics. Computer analysis of data is a key part of all experiments. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or ENGR 145.

Dates: July 9-August 2, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:00-2:00

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 223: Introductory Organic Chemistry I

Introductory course for science majors and engineering students. Develops themes of structure and bonding along with elementary reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers as well as an introduction to spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWRF 10:30-12:20

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 224: Introductory Organic Chemistry II

Continues and extends themes of structure and bonding from CHEM 223 and continues spectroscopy and more complex reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of aromatic rings, carbonyl compounds, amines, and selected special topics. Prereq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

Dates: July 9-August 2, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWRF 10:30-12:20

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 233: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 and CHEM 113 or equivalent. Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323. An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 and CHEM 113 or equivalent. Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 1:00-2:00

Instructor: Gregory Tochtrop

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 234: Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

A continuation of CHEM 233, involving multi-step organic synthesis, peptide synthesis, product purification and analysis using sophisticated analytical techniques such as chromatography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 233. Coreq: CHEM 224

Dates: July 9-August 2, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 1:00-2:00

Instructor: Gregory Tochtrop

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 328/428: Introductory Biochemistry I

A survey of biochemistry with a strong emphasis on the chemical logic underlying metabolic pathways and the evolution of biomolecules. Cellular architecture. Amino acids and protein structure, purification, analysis, and synthesis. DNA, RNA, the flow of genetic information, and molecular biological technology. Enzyme kinetics, catalytic, and regulatory strategies. Sugars, complex carbohydrates, and glycoproteins. Lipids and cell membranes. Glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, carbon fixation through the “dark reactions” of photosynthesis, aerobic catabolism through the citric acid cycle, and glycogen metabolism. Biosynthesis and degradation of fatty acids, amino acids, and proteins. Offered as CHEM 328 and CHEM 428. Prereq: CHEM 224 or CHEM 324.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:30-12:20

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CHEM 348/448: Chemistry of Fermentation and Brewing

To discern the molecular basis of fermentation and beer brewing, this course includes in-depth discussions of the chemistry underlying either an aspect of the brewing process or a style of beer (alt, kolsch, porter, bock, mead, ale, etc.).  The biochemistry of yeast fermentation, as well as mashing, lautering, boiling, conditioning, filtering, and packaging will be discussed.  There is no lab component (such as brewing beer), although field trips to the Jolly-Scholar pub (located on campus) will be part of the course, as well as invited speakers who have set up local microbreweries.  Each student will be expected to have basic background knowledge of chemistry, such as material taught in standard first year General Chemistry courses (CHEM 105, 106, and 111).  Lastly, the teacher of this course is a seasoned chemistry professor who has extensive experience with brewing beer!

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Chemistry

CLSC 202: Classical Mythology

The myths of Classical Greece and Rome, their interpretation and influence. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

Dates: June 17-July 29, 2019

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TR 9:00-12:00

Instructor: Rachel Sternberg

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Classics

CLSC 326/426: Rome on Site: The Archaeology of the Eternal City

How did the city of Rome grow from a village of thatch-roofed huts to the center of a multicultural empire that stretched from Scotland to Syria and from the Danube to the Sahara? Who were the ancient Romans who saw and oversaw this rapid expansion of power? And how can we trace their rise, political transformations, and later successors through the material remains of their capital city? We’ll examine these topics and more during an 18-day study tour of the major archaeological sites and museums of Rome and its neighbors, including day trips to the Etruscan tombs at Tarquinia and Cerveteri, the archaeological playground of Ostia, the hill-top city of Palestrina, and the ongoing excavations at Gabii, as well as an extended trip to the Bay of Naples to explore the spectacular remains of the cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum.

Prereq.: Instructor Approval. Fulfills Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement.

Visit the class website here.

Dates: June 9-June 27, 2019

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: Evelyn Adkins, Mark Hammond

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Classics, New 2019 Summer, Study Abroad

COGS 322: Human Learning and the Brain

This course focuses on the question, “How does the human brain learn?” Through assigned readings, extensive class discussions, and a major paper, each student will explore personal perspectives on learning. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: the brain’s cycle of learning; neocortex structure and function; emotion and limbic brain; synapse dynamics and changes in learning; images in cognition; symbolic brain (language, mathematics, music); memory formation; and creative thought and brain mechanisms. The major paper will be added to each student’s SAGES writing portfolio. In addition, near the end of the semester, each student will make an oral presentation on a chosen topic.
Offered as BIOL 302 and COGS 322.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MWF 9:00-11:30

Instructor: Barbara Kuemerle

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Cognitive Science

DSCI 352/452: Applied Data Science Research

This is a project based data science research class, in which project teams identify a research project under the guidance of a domain expert professor. The research is structured as a data analysis project including the 6 steps of developing a reproducible data science project, including 1: Define the ADS question, 2: Identify, locate, and/or generate the data 3: Exploratory data analysis 4: Statistical modeling and prediction 5: Synthesizing the results in the domain context 6: Creation of reproducible research, Including code, datasets, documentation and reports.  During the course special topic lectures will include Ethics, Privacy, Openness, Security, Ethics. Value.  Offered as DSCI 352 and DSCI 452.  Prereq: (DSCI 133 or DSCI 134 or ENGR 131 or EECS 132) and (STAT 312R or STAT 201R or SYBB 310 or PQHS/EPBI 431 or OPRE 207) and (DSCI 351 or (SYBB 311A and SYBB 311B and SYBB 311C and SYBB 311D) or SYBB 321 or MKMR 201).

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 12:30-2:00

Instructor: Laura Bruckman

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Materials Science & Engineering

EBME 370: Principles of Biomedical Engineering Design

Students learn and implement the design process to produce working prototypes of medical devices with potential commercial value to meet significant clinical needs.  Critical examination of contemporary medical problems is used to develop a specific problem statement.  The class is divided into teams of 3 to 4 students.  Each team integrates their knowledge and skills to design a device to meet their clinical need.  Project planning and management, including resource allocation, milestones, and documentation, are required to ensure successful completion of projects within the allotted time and budget.  Formal design reviews by a panel of advisors and outside medical device experts are required every four weeks.  Every student is required to give oral presentations at each formal review and is responsible for formal documentation of the design process, resulting in an executive summary and complete design history file of the project.  The course culminates with a public presentation of the team’s device to a panel of experts.  This course is expected to provide the student with a real-world, capstone design experience.team’s device to a panel of experts.  This course is expected to provide the student with a real-world, capstone design experience.  Recommended preparation: EBME 310

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Colin Drummond

Credits: 2 credits

Department: Biomedical Engineering

ECHE 305: Topics in Chemical Engineering

Topics in chemical engineering will be covered in an independent study mode. Readings and homework assignments will be assigned. Students are graded on the basis of homework assignments and a final exam.

 

 

Dates: June 24-August 23, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Instructor: Daniel Lacks

Credits: 1-3 credits

Department: Chemical Engineering

EECS 233: Introduction to Data Structures

The programming language Java; pointers, files, and recursion. Representation and manipulation of data: one way and circular linked lists, doubly linked lists; the available space list. Different representations of stacks and queues. Representation of binary trees, trees and graphs. Hashing; searching and sorting.  Prereq: EECS 132.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTW 9:30-11:30

Instructor: Chris Fietkiewicz

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS 246: Signals and Systems

Mathematical representation, characterization, and analysis of continuous-time signals and systems.  Development of elementary mathematical models of continuous-time dynamic systems.  Time domain and frequency domain analysis of linear time-invariant systems.  Fourier series, Fourier transforms, and Laplace transforms.  Sampling theorem.  Filter design.  Introduction to feedback control systems and feedback controller design.  Prereq: ENGR 210. Prereq or Coreq: MATH 224.

 

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 2:45-4:45

Instructor: Marc Buchner

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS 246: Signals and Systems

Mathematical representation, characterization, and analysis of continuous-time signals and systems.  Development of elementary mathematical models of continuous-time dynamic systems.  Time domain and frequency domain analysis of linear time-invariant systems.  Fourier series, Fourier transforms, and Laplace transforms.  Sampling theorem.  Filter design.  Introduction to feedback control systems and feedback controller design.  Prereq: ENGR 210. Prereq or Coreq: MATH 224.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 2:45-4:45

Instructor: Vira Chankong

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS 281: Logic Design and Computer Organization

Fundamentals of digital systems in terms of both computer organization and logic level design. Organization of digital computers; information representation; boolean algebra; analysis and synthesis of combinational and sequential circuits; datapaths and register transfers; instruction sets and assembly language; input/output and communication; memory.

Time: TWR 1:00-3:30

Instructor: Evren Gurkan Cavusoglu

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, New 2019 Summer

EECS 398: Engineering Projects I

Capstone course for electrical, computer and systems and control engineering seniors.  Material from previous and concurrent courses used to solve engineering design problems.  Professional engineering topics such as project management, engineering design, communications, and professional ethics.  Requirements include periodic reporting of progress, plus a final oral presentation and written report.  Scheduled formal project presentations during last week of classes.  Prereq or Coreq: ENGR 398 and ENGL 398.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: T 11:00-12:00

Instructor: Sree Sreenath

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS 399: Engineering Projects II

Continuation of EECS 398.  Material from previous and concurrent courses applied to engineering design and research.  Requirements include periodic reporting of progress, plus a final oral presentation and written report.  Prereq: Senior Standing.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: T 11:00-12:00

Instructor: Sree Sreenath

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EMAE 181: Dynamics

Elements of classical dynamics: particle kinematics and dynamics, including concepts of force, mass, acceleration, work, energy, impulse, momentum. Kinetics of systems of particles and of rigid bodies, including concepts of mass center, momentum, mass moment of inertia, dynamic equilibrium. Elementary vibrations. Recommended preparation: MATH 122 and PHYS 121 and ENGR 200.

Distance Learning Section (ITN) also offered.  Please see Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWRF 9:00-10:20

Instructor: Richard Bachmann

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Online

EMAE 250: Computers in Mechanical Engineering

Numerical methods including analysis and control of error and its propagation, solutions of systems of linear algebraic equations, solutions of nonlinear algebraic equations, curve fitting, interpolation, and numerical integration and differentiation. Recommended preparation: ENGR 131 and MATH 122.

Distance Learning Section (ITN) also offered.  Please see Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWRF 11:00-12:20

Instructor: Richard Bachmann

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Online

EMSE 368: Scientific Writing in Materials Science and Engineering

For writing a thesis (or a publication) in the field of materials science and engineering, students need a diverse set of skills in addition to mastering the scientific content. Generally, scientific writing requires proficiency in document organization, professional presentation of numerical and graphical data, literature retrieval and management, text processing, version control, graphical illustration, mathematical typesetting, the English language, elements of style, etc. Scientific writing in materials science and engineering, specifically, requires additional knowledge about e.g. conventions of numerical precision, error limits, mathematical typesetting, proper use of units, proper digital processing of micrographs, etc. Having to acquire these essential skills at the beginning of thesis (or publication) writing may compromise the outcome by distracting from the most important task of composing the best possible scientific content.
This course properly prepares students for scientific writing with a comprehensive spectrum of knowledge, skills, and tools enabling them to fully focus on the scientific content of their thesis or publication when the time has come to start writing. Similar to artistic drawing, where the ability to “see” is as (or more!) important as skills of the hand, the ability of proper scientific writing is intimately linked to the ability of critically reviewing scientific texts. Therefore, students will practice both authoring and critical reviewing of material science texts. To sharpen students’ skills of reviewing, examples of good and less good scientific writing will be taken from published literature of materials science and engineering and analyzed in the context of knowledge acquired in the course. At the end of the course, students will have set up skills and a highly functional work environment to start writing their role thesis or article with full focus on the scientific content. While the course mainly targets students of materials science and engineering, students of other disciplines of science and engineering may also benefit from the course material.
Offered as EMSE 368 and EMSE 468.

Dates: June 17-July 29, 2019

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MTWRF 2:00-3:15

Instructor: Frank Ernst

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Materials Science & Engineering, New 2019 Summer

ENGL 180: Writing Tutorial

English 180 is a one-credit writing tutorial class designed to develop students’ expository writing skills through weekly scheduled conferences with a Writing Resource Center Instructor. Goals are to produce clear, well-organized, and mechanically-acceptable prose, and to demonstrate learned writing skills throughout the term. Course content is highly individualized based on the instructor’s initial assessment of the student’s writing, and the student’s individual concerns. All students must produce a minimum of 12 pages of finished writing, and complete other assignments as designated by the instructor.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Instructor: Megan Jewell

Credits: 1 credit

Department: English

ENGL 203: Introduction to Creative Writing

A course exploring basic issues and techniques of writing narrative prose and verse through exercises, analysis, and experiment. For students who wish to try their abilities across a spectrum of genres.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: English

ENGL 370: Comics and the Graphic Novel

Selected topics in the study and analysis of comics and the graphic novel. Topics may include historical contexts of the genre, visual rhetoric, thematic developments, influence of literature, adaptations into film. A student may not receive credit for both ENGL 370 and ENGL 370C.
Offered as ENGL 370, ENGL 370C, and ENGL 470.

Prerequisite: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, or FSCS.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: English, New 2019 Summer

ENGR 131: Elementary Computer Programming

Students will learn the fundamentals of computer programming and algorithmic problem solving.  Concepts are illustrated using a wide range of examples from engineering, science, and other disciplines.  Students learn how to create, debug, and test computer programs, and how to develop algorithmic solution to problems and write programs that implement those solutions.  Matlab is the primary programming language used in this course, but other languages may be introduced or used throughout.   Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:30-11:50

Instructor: Amir Sajadi

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 145: Chemistry of Materials

Application of fundamental chemistry principles to materials. Emphasis is on bonding and how this relates to the structure and properties in metals, ceramics, polymers and electronic materials. Application of chemistry principles to develop an understanding of how to synthesize materials.   Prereq: CHEM 111 or equivalent.

 

Distance learning section (ITN) available. Check Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTW 1:30-3:30; R 1:30-2:30

Instructor: Peter Lagerlof

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Engineering, Online

ENGR 200: Statics and Strength of Materials

An introduction to the analysis, behavior and design of mechanical/structural systems.  Course topics include: concepts of equilibrium; geometric properties and distributed forces; stress, strain and mechanical properties of materials; and, linear elastic behavior of elements.  Prereq: PHYS 121.

 

Distance Learning Section (ITN) also offered.  Check Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

 

Dates: July 9-August 2, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MWF 10:30-1:20

Instructor: Xiangwu Zeng

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Engineering, Online

ENGR 200T: Statics and Strength of Materials in Tianjin, China

An introduction to the analysis, behavior and design of mechanical/structural systems.  Course topics include: concepts of equilibrium; geometric properties and distributed forces; stress, strain and mechanical properties of materials; and, linear elastic behavior of elements. Prereq: PHYS 121.

For more information, please visit the course website.

Dates: May 29-June 11, 2019

Session: Study Abroad

Time: MTWR 9:00-11:55

Instructor: Xiangwu Zeng

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Engineering, Study Abroad

ENGR 210: Introduction to Circuits and Instrumentation

Modeling and circuit analysis of analog and digital circuits.  Fundamental concepts in circuit analysis: voltage and current sources, Kirchhoff’s Laws, Thevenin, and Norton equivalent circuits, inductors capacitors, and transformers.  Modeling sensors and amplifiers and measuring DC device characteristics.  Characterization and measurement of time dependent waveforms.  Transient behavior of circuits.  Frequency dependent behavior of devices and amplifiers, frequency measurements.  AC power and power measurements.  Electronic devices as switches.  Prereq: MATH 122. Prereq or Coreq: PHYS 122.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTW 2:30-4:30; Lab TBD

Instructor: Christian Zorman

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Engineering

ENGR 225: Thermodynamics, Fluid Dynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer

Elementary thermodynamic concepts: first and second laws, and equilibrium. Basic fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and mass transfer: microscopic and macroscopic perspectives.  Prereq: CHEM 111, ENGR 145, and PHYS 121. Coreq: MATH 223.

 

Distance Learning Section (ITN) also offered.  Check Searchable Schedule of Classes for more information.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 4:00-6:00; REC M 4:00-5:55

Instructor: Paul Barnhart

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Engineering, Online

ETHS 306: The Cuban Experience

This is a three week study-abroad intensive course that takes place at Editorial Vigía, in Matanzas, Cuba. The course combines the unique advantages of a total immersion environment in Spanish with a classroom curriculum that includes conversation practice and study of relevant cultural, literary and historical issues. Students complete three hours of classroom instruction and an hour and a half of publishing workshop four days per week. In this workshop, they work in the edition of a bilingual book. In addition, they participate in organized visits to historic sites and museums connected to the culture curriculum. The focus of the culture curriculum is the study of Cuban history and culture through its literature, visual arts, films, and music. After applying and being accepted in the program, students meet for personal advising with the program director and attend four different one hour orientation-information meetings in the spring semester. After successful completion of the study-abroad program, students receive 3 upper-level credits in Spanish. The course is interdisciplinary in approach and provides students with the tools they need to analyze and understand the complexities of modern Cuba. Students will have formal classes taught by their professor and talks and meetings with specialists on Cuban literature, art, architecture, history and other aspects of culture and society. In addition, they will attend lectures, participate in discussions, and take field trips that will expose them to many aspects of Cuban culture, such as art, architecture, music, dance, film, literature, artisan work, folklore, history and urban growth. Offered as SPAN 306SPAN 406, and ETHS 306. Prereq: SPAN 202.

For more information, please visit the course website

Dates: May 13, 2019-June 2, 2019

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: Damaris Punales-Alpizar

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Ethnic Studies, Study Abroad

ETHS 393: Advanced Readings in the History of Race

This course examines the concept of race as a social construction that carries political and economic implications. We begin by examining the histories of the early racial taxonomists (e.g., Bernier, Linnaeus, and Blumenbach among others) and the contexts that informed their writings. We then assess how the concept of race changed from the nineteenth to the twentieth century in the United States. We conclude by evaluating how the ideology of race has influenced U.S. domestic life and foreign policy at specific historical moments.
Offered as HSTY 393, HSTY 493, and ETHS 393.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Ethnic Studies

FRCH 101: Elementary French I

Emphasizes conversational skills. Students are expected to achieve control of sound system and basic sentence structures of French. Students must complete assignments at the Online Language Learning Center in addition to attending scheduled class meetings.

Dates: June 3-June 28, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWRF 9:00-10:45; lab TBD

Instructor: Charlotte Sanpere

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

FRCH 328/428: Science and Technology in France

The course is an exploration of the development of science and technology in France, its rise in the 18th and 19th century, its subsequent decline until the mid-20th century, and its more recent renaissance–from both a scientific and humanities perspective. A significant component will focus on the contributions of women to science in France. Students will visit historical sites such as Marie Curie’s laboratory and the Foucault pendulum, as well as current research facilities such as the Soleil Synchrotron outside of Paris and the Large Hadron Collider in France/Switzerland. To supplement these site visits, readings will come from the fields of science and technology (e.g., popular journals such as Scientific American), history, and French literature–either in French or English translation as appropriate for the student and the enrollment choice.
Offered as: FRCH 328, FRCH 428, WGST 333, WLIT 353 and WLIT 453.

Dates: May 12,2019 - May 31, 2019

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2019 Summer, Study Abroad

HSTY 124: Sex and the City: Gender & Urban History

Gender is an identity and an experience written onto the spaces of the city. The urban landscape – with its streets, buildings, bridges, parks and squares – shapes and reflects gender identities and sexual relations. This course examines the relationship between gender and urban space from the 19th century to the present, giving special attention to the city of Cleveland. Using Cleveland as our case study, this course will explore some of the many ways in which cities and the inhabitants of cities have been historically sexed, gendered, and sexualized. We will explore the ways in which gender was reflected and constructed by the built environment, as well as how urban space and urban life shaped gender and sexual identities. The course is organized thematically and explores different aspects of city life such as prostitution, urban crime, labor, politics, urban renewal and decay, consumption and leisure and the ways in which sex and gender intersects with these issues. In addition to reading and analyzing secondary and primary sources, we will also experience ourselves how gender is being written onto the urban landscape by walking in the city and going to its museums.

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Instructor: Einav Rabinovitch-Fox

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

HSTY 306/406: History Museums: Theory and Reality

This course is an intensive summer internship (10 hours per week) at the Western Reserve Historical Society, complemented by extensive readings in museum/archival theory and public historical perception. It is designed both to introduce students to museum/archival work and to compare theoretical concepts with actual museum situations. Interns will be assigned a specific project within one of the Society’s curatorial or administrative divisions, but will have the opportunity to work on ancillary tasks throughout the Historical Society’s headquarters in University Circle. Offered as HSTY 306 and HSTY 406.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Instructor: John Grabowski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: History

HSTY 393: Advanced Readings in the History of Race

This course examines the concept of race as a social construction that carries political and economic implications. We begin by examining the histories of the early racial taxonomists (e.g., Bernier, Linnaeus, and Blumenbach among others) and the contexts that informed their writings. We then assess how the concept of race changed from the nineteenth to the twentieth century in the United States. We conclude by evaluating how the ideology of race has influenced U.S. domestic life and foreign policy at specific historical moments.
Offered as HSTY 393, HSTY 493, and ETHS 393.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Instructor: John Flores

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: History, New 2019 Summer

ITAL 101: Elementary Italian I

Introductory course; stress on mastery of the sound system and basic sentence structure of spoken and written Italian. Independent laboratory practice is a requirement.

Dates: June 3-June 28, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWR 9:30-12:30; lab TBD

Instructor: Denise Caterinacci

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, New 2019 Summer

ITAL 102: Elementary Italian II

Continuation of ITAL 101; independent laboratory practice is required in addition to scheduled class meetings.

Dates: July 9-August 2, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWR 9:30-12:30; lab TBD

Instructor: Denise Caterinacci

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Modern Languages and Literatures

MATH 121: Calculus for Science and Engineering I

Functions, analytic geometry of lines and polynomials, limits, derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Definite integral, antiderivatives, fundamental theorem of calculus, change of variables. Recommended preparation: Three and one half years of high school mathematics. Credit for at most one of MATH 121, MATH 123 and MATH 125 can be applied to hours required for graduation.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 8:45-10:15

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 4 credits

Departments: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics, New 2019 Summer

MATH 122: Calculus for Science and Engineering II

Continuation of MATH 121. Exponentials and logarithms, growth and decay, inverse trigonometric functions, related rates, basic techniques of integration, area and volume, polar coordinates, parametric equations. Taylor polynomials and Taylor’s theorem.  Prereq: MATH 121, MATH 123 or MATH 126.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 8:45-10:15

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 126: Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci II

Continuation of MATH 125 covering differential equations, multivariable calculus, discrete methods. Partial derivatives, maxima and minima for functions of two variables, linear regression. Differential equations; first and second order equations, systems, Taylor series methods; Newton’s method; difference equations. Prereq: MATH 121, MATH 123 or MATH 125.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 8:45-10:15

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 201: Introduction to Linear Algebra for Applications

Matrix operations, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, subspaces, bases and linear independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization of matrices, linear transformations, determinants. Less theoretical than MATH 308. May not be taken for credit by mathematics majors. Only one of MATH 201 or MATH 308 may be taken for credit. Prereq: MATH 122, MATH 124 or MATH 126.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 10:30-11:45

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 223: Calculus for Science and Engineering III

Introduction to vector algebra; lines and planes. Functions of several variables: partial derivatives, gradients, chain rule, directional derivative, maxima/minima. Multiple integrals, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Derivatives of vector valued functions, velocity and acceleration. Vector fields, line integrals, Green’s theorem. Prereq: MATH 122 or MATH 124.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 9:00-10:15

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MATH 224: Elementary Differential Equations

A first course in ordinary differential equations. First order equations and applications, linear equations with constant coefficients, linear systems, Laplace transforms, numerical methods of solution. Prereq: MATH 223 or MATH 227.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTWR 9:00-10:15

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

MUGN 201: Introduction to Music: Listening Experience I

A flexible approach to the study of the materials and literature of music. Aural and analytical skills primarily for classical music.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 10:30-12:00

Instructor: Eric Charnofsky

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Music, New 2019 Summer

PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy

Basic problems of philosophy and methods of philosophical thinking. Problems raised by science, morality, religion, politics, and art. Readings from classical and contemporary philosophers. Normally given in multiple sections with different instructors and possibly with different texts. All sections share core materials in theory of knowledge, metaphysics, and ethics despite differences that may exist in emphasis.

Dates: June 3-June 28, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWR 1:30-3:45

Instructor: Christopher Haufe

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHIL 201: Introduction to Logic

Presentation, application, and evaluation of formal methods for determining the validity of arguments. Discussion of the relationship between logic and other disciplines. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Colin McLarty

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Philosophy

PHYS 115: Introductory Physics I

First part of a two-semester sequence directed primarily towards students working towards a B.A. in science, with an emphasis on the life sciences. Kinematics; Newton’s laws; gravitation; simple harmonic motion; mechanical waves; fluids; ideal gas law; heat and the first and second laws of thermodynamics. This course has a laboratory component.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 9:30-11:20; lab MW 12:30-3:30

Instructor: Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 116: Introductory Physics II

Electrostatics, Coulomb’s law, Gauss’s law; capacitance and resistance; DC circuits; magnetic fields; electromagnetic induction; RC and RL circuits; light; geometrical optics; interference and diffraction; special relativity; introduction to quantum mechanics; elements of atomic, nuclear and particle physics. This course has a laboratory component. Prereq: PHYS 115.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: July 9-August 2, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWRF 9:30-11:20; lab MW 12:30-3:30

Instructor: Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 121: General Physics I – Mechanics

Particle dynamics, Newton’s laws of motion, energy and momentum conservation, rotational motion, and angular momentum conservation. This course has a laboratory component. Recommended preparation: MATH 121 or MATH 123 or MATH 125 or one year of high school calculus.

 

This course is co-taught by Harsh Mathur and Corbin Covault.  The laboratory is taught by Diana Driscoll.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTWR 9:30-11:20; lab TR 12:30-3:30

Instructor: Corbin Covault, Harsh Mathur, Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PHYS 122: General Physics II – Electricity and Magnetism

Electricity and magnetism, emphasizing the basic electromagnetic laws of Gauss, Ampere, and Faraday. Maxwell’s equations and electromagnetic waves, interference, and diffraction. This course has a laboratory component. Prereq: PHYS 121 or PHYS 123. Prereq or Coreq: MATH 122 or MATH 124 or MATH 126.

 

This course is co-taught by Harsh Mathur and Corbin Covault.  The laboratory is taught by Diana Driscoll.

 

Visit this page for detailed information about the introductory physics sequences.

Dates: July 9-August 2, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTWRF 9:30-11:20; lab TR 12:30-3:30

Instructor: Corbin Covault, Harsh Mathur, Diana Driscoll

Credits: 4 credits

Department: Physics

PSCL 101: General Psychology

Methods, research, and theories of psychology. Basic research from such areas as psychophysiology, sensation, perception, development, memory, learning, psychopathology, and social psychology.

Dates: June 17-July 29, 2019

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TWR 10:30-12:30

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 230: Child Psychology

Basic facts and principles of psychological development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: TR 9:00-12:30

Instructor: Rita Obeid

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, Psychological Sciences

PSCL 282: Quantitative Methods in Psychology

The theory and application of basic methods used in the analysis of psychological data. Not available for credit to students who have completed STAT 201 or ANTH 319. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTR 1:00-3:30

Instructor: Arin Connell

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 313: Psychology of Personality

The development and organization of personality; theories of personality and methods for assessing the person; problems of personal adjustment.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTW 1:00-3:30

Instructor: Amy Przeworski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 321: Abnormal Psychology

Major syndromes of mental disorders, their principal symptoms, dynamics, etiology, and treatment. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 3-July 5, 2019

Session: 5 Week Session

Time: MTW 9:00-11:30

Instructor: Amy Przeworski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Psychological Sciences

PSCL 329: Adolescence

Psychological perspectives on physical, cognitive, and social development. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:00-12:00

Instructor: Betsy Short

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, Psychological Sciences

PSCL 353: Psychology of Learning

The basic methods in the study of learning. The major theories proposed to account for the learning process. Development of the fundamental concepts and principles governing the learning process in both humans and lower animal. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

Dates: June 17-July 29, 2019

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: TWR 4:00-6:00

Instructor: Robert Greene

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, Psychological Sciences

RLGN 215: Religion in America

This course is an introduction to American religions, with a particular focus on religious diversity in the United States. As we examine the myriad beliefs and practices of America’s religious communities, we will pay close attention to how religion and culture have shaped each other from the 1600s to today.

To explore the theme of religious diversity, we will take advantage of Cleveland’s rich religious history with visits to local religious institutions and historical sites, including churches, mosques, new religious communities, and Hindu and Buddhist temples. Along the way we will consider the role of religious spaces and institutions in shaping identity and community in our region and beyond.

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Instructor: Brian Clites

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Religious Studies

SOCI 113: Critical Problems in Modern Society

Focus is on major social problems present in large, complex, industrial societies. Topics include environmental problems, poverty, drug addiction, social deviance, and alienation.

Dates: June 3-June 28, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: TWR 1:00-4:00

Instructor: Jessica Kelley

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SOCI 208: Dating, Marriage and Family

What is the family today? How has it changed over the last century? How will it change in the future? This course aims to answer these questions as it explores the influences of work, education, government, health and religion on today’s changing families. The course considers the factors that affect mate selection. It also examines parenting, roles of husbands and wives, and family dysfunction, and divorce.

 

 

Dates: June 3-June 28, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (1)

Time: MTWR 10:00-12:15

Instructor: Heather Hurwitz

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SOCI 250: Law and Society: Law, Rights and Policy

How does the U.S. legal system “work”? How does a judge make a decision? Do rights matter? Do human rights work the same way? Class participants will examine how rights, including human rights, fit in the legal system and society. We will ask how legal actors, like judges and lawyers, think about rights compared to non-lawyers. Class participants will observe court hearings in a Federal District Court, an Ohio Appellate Court, as well as local small claims court. We will benefit from hearing experts, local, national, and international, discuss how “law” works and whether rights are useful to making change.

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:30-12:00

Instructor: Brian Gran

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Sociology

SPAN 306/406: The Cuban Experience

This is a three week study-abroad intensive course that takes place at Editorial Vigía, in Matanzas, Cuba. The course combines the unique advantages of a total immersion environment in Spanish with a classroom curriculum that includes conversation practice and study of relevant cultural, literary and historical issues. Students complete three hours of classroom instruction and an hour and a half of publishing workshop four days per week. In this workshop, they work in the edition of a bilingual book. In addition, they participate in organized visits to historic sites and museums connected to the culture curriculum. The focus of the culture curriculum is the study of Cuban history and culture through its literature, visual arts, films, and music. After applying and being accepted in the program, students meet for personal advising with the program director and attend four different one hour orientation-information meetings in the spring semester. After successful completion of the study-abroad program, students receive 3 upper-level credits in Spanish. The course is interdisciplinary in approach and provides students with the tools they need to analyze and understand the complexities of modern Cuba. Students will have formal classes taught by their professor and talks and meetings with specialists on Cuban literature, art, architecture, history and other aspects of culture and society. In addition, they will attend lectures, participate in discussions, and take field trips that will expose them to many aspects of Cuban culture, such as art, architecture, music, dance, film, literature, artisan work, folklore, history and urban growth. Offered as SPAN 306SPAN 406, and ETHS 306. Prereq: SPAN 202.

For more information, please visit the course website

Dates: May 13-June 2, 2019

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: Damaris Punales-Alpizar

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: Modern Languages and Literatures, Study Abroad

STAT 312: Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science

For advanced undergraduate students in engineering, physical sciences, life sciences. Comprehensive introduction to probability models and statistical methods of analyzing data with the object of formulating statistical models and choosing appropriate methods for inference from experimental and observational data and for testing the model’s validity. Balanced approach with equal emphasis on probability, fundamental concepts of statistics, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, design of experiments, and regression modeling. Note: Credit given for only one (1) of STAT 312, STAT 313, STAT 333, STAT 433. Prereq: MATH 122 or equivalent.

Dates: June 17-July 29, 2019

Session: 6 Week Session

Time: MTW 4:00-6:00

Instructor: Wojbor Woyczynski

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

THTR 100: Introduction to Acting

A course designed to provide the non-major or undeclared liberal arts major experience with a basic understanding of acting and performance. Fundamentals in improvisation, vocabulary, and scene study are stressed. This course fulfills THTR 101 or THTR 102 should the undeclared student select theater as his or her major or minor. Students may receive credit for only one of THTR 100, THTR 101, or THTR 102.

Dates: July 9-August 2, 2019

Session: 4 Week Session (2)

Time: MTW 6:00-9:00

Instructor: Christopher Bohan

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Theater

THTR 206: Mr. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang: James Bond and Popular Culture

The twenty-one films of James Bond have become part of popular culture, and the figure of the superspy has become mythic in proportion. This series, from its first installment in 1963 to the latest reinvention of James Bond in 2006, not only depicts one dashing man’s efforts to save the world from disaster again and again, but also traces the development of our popular culture. Issues of violence, sex, the presentation and treatment of women, racial stereotypes, and spectacle among other topics can be discussed after viewing each film, providing an opportunity to explore the changing expectations of American audiences and the developing form of contemporary cinema. Students who have taken USSO 286D may not receive credit for this class.

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: TRF 9:30-12:00; MW 9:30-1:00

Instructor: Jeffrey Ullom

Credits: 3 credits

Department: Theater

UNIV 300: Premedical Concepts and Review: MCAT Preparation

This course is designed to comprehensively review all Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) content areas, as well as testing methods, and hone the skills students need to improve performance on the MCAT. This course will be team taught to include faculty expertise in biochemistry, biology, chemistry, English, mathematics, physics, psychological sciences, and sociology. Critical analysis and reasoning skills will be emphasized. Students will gain practice working on MCAT questions that test knowledge and critical thinking. Faculty will provide directed feedback to students to assist them in their test taking strategies.  Completion of introductory courses in all subject areas above is strongly recommended before taking this review course.

The MCAT is administered by the AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges). Course materials include sample questions, two practice exams, and other materials from the AAMC.

May Term: 5/13 – 5/30, MTWRF, 9:30am – 1:30pm

View this course in the Schedule of Classes here.

Dates: May 13-May 31, 2019

Session: May Term

Time: MTWRF 9:30-1:30

Instructor: Rebecca Benard, Susan Burden-Gulley, Greg Tochtrop, Kim Emmons, Diana Driscoll, Arin Connell, Jessica Kelly, Jill Korbin

Credits: 3 credits

Department:

USNA 285: The Science of Madness: An Historical Investigation of Mental Illness

Since antiquity the western world’s understanding of mental illness has continued to evolve. This course will examine the trajectory of that evolution, looking at the medical theories that have influenced assumptions about the causes and treatments of mental illness from the early modern era through the twenty-first century. Examples of questions we will investigate include: How we have defined the normal and the pathological in human mental behavior over time? How do we explain the centuries-old correlation that medicine has made between creativity and mental illness? Which past and present psychiatric treatments have been beneficial and which harmful? How did Darwin’s theory of evolution affect theories of mental illness (and how does it continue to do so with the advent of evolutionary psychology)? How have changing philosophies of science affected the research and practice of psychology? How and why do the sciences of the mind–psychiatry, psychoanalysis, clinical psychology, psychopharmacology, the cognitive neurosciences–claim so much scientific authority and exert influence over our lives today? As a frame work for this inquiry, the class will use the concept of paradigm shifts as Thomas Kuhn defines in his classic work, the Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Prereq: Passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSNA, FSCC, FSSO, FSSY or FSCS. Prereq or Coreq: FSTS 100.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 4:00-5:30

Instructor: Barbara Burgess-Van Aken

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSO 291X: “We’re Dying in America”: The History of the U.S. AIDS Crisis

Thirty-seven years have passed since the summer of 1981, when the Centers for Disease Control published a report on the mysterious deaths of five previously-healthy gay men. In that time, more than thirty-nine million people have died of AIDS around the globe. Approximately 600,000 of those people died in the United States; at least 10,000 more Americans will die this year. Why, given the global scope of the crisis and the dramatic impact it has had on US society and culture, do so few students learn about the AIDS crisis in school? Why does it receive less attention than, for example, terrorism? In this course, we will study the first 20 years of the United States’ AIDS crisis, and use what we learn to contemplate the current status of HIV-positive people and people with AIDS. We will examine the origins of AIDS as a biological, political, and cultural phenomenon in the hopes of understanding why the United States experienced the virus as it did. We will also address the myriad responses to the virus by presidents and preachers, artists and activists, doctors and business people. How did this tragedy impact American politics and culture? What lessons did we learn, and what mistakes are we still repeating today? How can (and should) the history of AIDS inform our response to the opioid crisis, or the battle over Obamacare? Are we ready for the next epidemic?

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWF 12:00-1:30

Instructor: Andrea Milne

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, SAGES

USSO 291J: Narratives of Immigration

As one of the most pressing issues of the twenty-first century, immigration has captured the imagination of politicians and authors alike. In this class, we will explore the stories of those who have migrated to the United States. We will analyze how various writers create autobiographical and fictional narratives of migration, addressing issues such as adjusting to different cultures, learning new languages, and adapting to new environments. Through these stories and histories, we will ask broader questions about immigration, including: is migration a basic human right? Is it ethical to define someone as being “illegal” for peacefully working and living in a different country from where they were born? What are the gendered, ethnic, cultural, and racial barriers that exist when migrating between countries? What are the cost(s) of citizenship and embracing a new country as one’s home? As the United States is largely seen as a nation of immigrants, how have immigrants’ stories perpetuated or undermined this reputation?

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWR 2:30-4:00

Instructor: Cara Byrne

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSY 286U: Puzzled

“Puzzled” will look at the practice of puzzle making and puzzle-solving and explore the meaning of puzzles for different cultures throughout history. We will read works from the disciplines of math, history, anthropology, philosophy, and literature. We will explore why certain types of puzzles became popular and how puzzles have transferred from one culture to another. We will examine the role of code writing and code-breaking in the military and in the world of business. We will read examples of fiction and watch films that adopt the form of the puzzle as a narrative device. We will think about the function of puzzles as instruments to exercise the faculties of reason and logic and as a means of leisure or pleasant distraction.

Students will be asked to both solve and create puzzles over the course of the semester. They will write analytical essays on topics related to the practice and history of puzzle making and puzzle solving, and they will pursue a research topic that revolves around an issue or problem that has “puzzled” them.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TWR 2:30-4:00

Instructor: Bernie Jim

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, SAGES

USSY 292Q: The Secret Lives of Animals

Animals are instructive. When we study animals, their biological makeups and creaturely habits, we do so with hopes of learning something about them. At the same time, such investigations often betray an interest in our human selves. The study of animals, in scientific and literary laboratories alike, quickly turns to acts of self-discovery: not what it means to be animal, exactly, but what it means to be human-animals. So what more could we learn by cultivating new strategies for listening and new languages for communicating with animals?

This seminar invites students to investigate the secret lives of animals as imagined in a sampling of classical, medieval and modern literatures. Thinking with animals past and present–in fables, manuals, and tales–we will examine human-animal relationships in imagined settings. Over the course of the semester, we will read, view, listen, and perform works in which animals are tasked with teaching moral lessons and testing the ethical obligations of their human audiences. Comparing treatments of companion animals past and present, we will reflect on the many ways literature can guide our evolving relationship to the animal kingdom.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MTR 6:30-8:00

Instructor: Arthur Russell

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, SAGES

USSY 293I: High Art and Guilty Pleasures

How, and why, do we draw distinctions between art and entertainment? Lowbrow and highbrow? A crowd-pleasing “flick” and a critic-approved “film?” This seminar will explore the logic of this common sorting process, as well as its consequences. After all, such distinctions historically have been linked with other forms of discrimination–often amplifying or silencing certain voices on the basis of gender, race, or class. In this course we’ll investigate these connections between critical evaluation and broader social dynamics, while also engaging critically with our own tastes, values, and received ideas. What makes The Great Gatsby so great? Is there any value in keeping up with the Kardashians? Who determines the criteria that make one work a “classic,” the other a “guilty pleasure?” Traversing a range of artworks, novels, comics, and movies, we’ll work both the high and the low ends of the cultural spectrum, paying special attention to works that seem to blur or combine the usual categories–compelling us to ask whether great art and guilty pleasures can sometimes be one and the same.

Dates: June 3-July 29, 2019

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWR 1:00-2:30

Instructor: Steve PInkerton

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, SAGES

WGST 333: Science and Technology in France

The course is an exploration of the development of science and technology in France, its rise in the 18th and 19th century, its subsequent decline until the mid-20th century, and its more recent renaissance–from both a scientific and humanities perspective. A significant component will focus on the contributions of women to science in France. Students will visit historical sites such as Marie Curie’s laboratory and the Foucault pendulum, as well as current research facilities such as the Soleil Synchrotron outside of Paris and the Large Hadron Collider in France/Switzerland. To supplement these site visits, readings will come from the fields of science and technology (e.g., popular journals such as Scientific American), history, and French literature–either in French or English translation as appropriate for the student and the enrollment choice.
Offered as: FRCH 328, FRCH 428, WGST 333, WLIT 352 and WLIT 453.

Dates: May 12, 2019 - May 31, 2019

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, Study Abroad, Women's and Gender Studies

WLIT 353/453: Science and Technology in France

The course is an exploration of the development of science and technology in France, its rise in the 18th and 19th century, its subsequent decline until the mid-20th century, and its more recent renaissance–from both a scientific and humanities perspective. A significant component will focus on the contributions of women to science in France. Students will visit historical sites such as Marie Curie’s laboratory and the Foucault pendulum, as well as current research facilities such as the Soleil Synchrotron outside of Paris and the Large Hadron Collider in France/Switzerland. To supplement these site visits, readings will come from the fields of science and technology (e.g., popular journals such as Scientific American), history, and French literature–either in French or English translation as appropriate for the student and the enrollment choice.
Offered as: FRCH 328, FRCH 428, WGST 333, WLIT 352 and WLIT 453.

Dates: May 12, 2019 - May 31, 2019

Session: Study Abroad

Instructor: TBA

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2019 Summer, Study Abroad, World Literature

Scroll To Top