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USNA 285: The Science of Madness: An Historical Investigation of Mental Illness

Since antiquity the western world’s understanding of mental illness has continued to evolve. This course will examine the trajectory of that evolution, looking at the medical theories that have influenced assumptions about the causes and treatments of mental illness from the early modern era through the twenty-first century. Examples of questions we will investigate include: How we have defined the normal and the pathological in human mental behavior over time? How do we explain the centuries-old correlation that medicine has made between creativity and mental illness? Which past and present psychiatric treatments have been beneficial and which harmful? How did Darwin’s theory of evolution affect theories of mental illness (and how does it continue to do so with the advent of evolutionary psychology)? How have changing philosophies of science affected the research and practice of psychology? How and why do the sciences of the mind–psychiatry, psychoanalysis, clinical psychology, psychopharmacology, the cognitive neurosciences–claim so much scientific authority and exert influence over our lives today? As a frame work for this inquiry, the class will use the concept of paradigm shifts as Thomas Kuhn defines in his classic work, the Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Prereq: Passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSNA, FSCC, FSSO, FSSY or FSCS. Prereq or Coreq: FSTS 100.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuWTh 4:00-5:30p

Instructor: Barbara Burgess-Van Aken

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USNA 287S: Society and Natural Resource

The relationship between humans and the natural world can be defined in large part by how societies manage natural resources. In this seminar, students will analyze how society-environment interactions have undergone substantial shifts over time…from John Locke’s Labor Theory of Value and the rise of utilitarian conservation to more recent approaches based on ecosystem management that emphasize ecological integrity and stakeholder collaboration. Course readings will challenge students to think critically about how humans conceptualize and impact the environment. Class time will be spent discussing the evolution of effective human-ecological systems interactions as outlined in the readings, as well as reviewing student reflection papers that connect course concepts to real word scenarios. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TR 6:00-8:30p

Instructor: Scott Hardy

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, SAGES

USSO 288C: Green Transformation and Globalization

This seminar introduces students to the recent major green transformation in China and elsewhere in the world, focusing on the way the green changes took place in relation to globalization, environment and climate protection, technology innovation, income redistribution, domestic consumption, and education, to meet the challenges of financial crisis, climate change, energy insecurity, and international competition. The seminar will also assess the impacts of various aspects of green transformation and globalization on today’s and future world and vice versa. This seminar promotes broad knowledge of-and increased appreciation of the importance of diversity in China’s cultural past, social frameworks, economic conditions, and natural environment. In a close connection to the primary readings, which include several recent relevant works, the students will be exposed to a variety of related primary and secondary materials (such as texts, photos, film clips, music, songs, and websites). In addition to receiving informative yet concise instruction, the student will also be involved in practice in critical reading and thinking, in writing and orally presenting research papers. In these activities, the students will be introduced to basic methods and concepts critical to the understanding of important economic, social, and cultural developments and changes as products of movements rather than isolated incidents. Prereq: Passing letter grade in a first year seminar in FSCC, FSNA, FSSY or FSCS. Prereq or Coreq: FSTS 100. Requisites not met permission required if previous course completion in this subject group.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuTh 2:00-4:20p

Instructor: Peter Yang

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSO 291J: Narratives of Immigration

As one of the most pressing issues of the twenty-first century, immigration has captured the imagination of politicians and authors alike. In this class, we will explore the stories of those who have migrated to the United States. We will analyze how various writers create autobiographical and fictional narratives of migration, addressing issues such as adjusting to different cultures, learning new languages, and adapting to new environments. Through these stories and histories, we will ask broader questions about immigration, including: is migration a basic human right? Is it ethical to define someone as being “illegal” for peacefully working and living in a different country from where they were born? What are the gendered, ethnic, cultural, and racial barriers that exist when migrating between countries? What are the cost(s) of citizenship and embracing a new country as one’s home? As the United States is largely seen as a nation of immigrants, how have immigrants’ stories perpetuated or undermined this reputation?

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MW 6:00-8:30p

Instructor: Cara Byrne

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSY 288I: Diversions: Experimental Stories and New Media

In this course, students will study works in which the authors and artists have experimented with traditional linear forms and created stories that are, for instance, labyrinthine, framed, collaged, geometrical, digressive, and even networked. While both print-based and digital texts offer spaces for diverse and deeply engaging written or visual performances, they also require further critical inquiry into the ways in which they create, reflect, or resist social and cultural values. Our focus in this course will be exploring how stories (and other texts) – in print, on screen, on canvas, in digital formats – that don’t follow or that play with conventional rules of order encourage us to participate in making sense of our contemporary world. The goals of the course include: exploring the relationship between form and content in written and visual productions, developing a critical perspective from which to enjoy, assess, and respond creatively to traditional print and multimedia presentations, and making excellent use of research resources at CWRU and cultural resources at University Circle. In addition, students will work to develop their writing and presentation skills and to innovate novel models of research writing. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWTh 10:30a-12:00p

Instructor: Kristine Kelly

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, SAGES

USSY 289G: The American West on Film

Few geographical areas in the United States contain as many tall tales and mythological figures as the American frontier. From an extreme point of view, the West is the only American myth because no other nation can claim the cowboy, the Native American, or the immigrant worker on the transcontinental railroad. And yet, each of these figures remains spectacularly diverse. We celebrate their variety and lionize their individuality in film, popular novels, and cultural criticism. From the visions of the New World to the conquest of the frontier, the color of the American West proliferates and transforms, defining our culture. In this course, we will investigate how critics have understood our fascination with the Western frontier. The class will broadly explore version of the frontier in novels, films, and historical accounts. Reading about the history of the actual west, the course will then examine how the films of the twentieth century alter history in order to express the fantasies and anxieties of their own time. By studying both history and film, we will be able to interrogate manifest destiny and the myth of American exceptionalism. What makes the West such an integral part of our understanding of America? How has its actual history become myth? What does the American fascination with the cowboy, the Native American, or the outlaw imply about our nation? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: TuTh 1:00-3:30p

Instructor: Joshua Hoeynck

Credits: 3 credits

Department: SAGES

USSY 293R: Representing the AIDS Crisis

In this course, we will examine how the AIDS Crisis of the 1980s and 1990s was represented in American literature, film, and art, and how authors and artists engaged imaginatively with the Crisis. As we examine a number of works that represent the AIDS Crisis, our inquiry will focus on the following questions: How do activists use literary and artistic works for political and social change? How do artists and writers use and represent activism in their works? More specifically, what role does metaphor play in how HIV/AIDS is understood? What are the ethics of representing the AIDS Crisis? Is it unethical for writers and artists to use tragic events imaginatively?

To answer these questions, we will examine a variety of representations of the Crisis across a number of genres, notably novels, short stories, zines, films, and conceptual art. The texts under examination represent a variety of perspectives on the topic of HIV/AIDS, from activists and artists, members of the LGBTQ community, racial and ethnic minorities, and differing socioeconomic classes. By comparing these genres, we trace the often-conflicting strategies used by authors and artists for representing the AIDS Crisis. Theoretical texts will introduce students to queer perspectives, concepts of testimonial writing and bearing witness to tragic events, the uses of the imagination in creating art and literature, and the functioning of metaphor in art and society.

Dates: June 4-July 30, 2018

Session: 8 Week Session

Time: MWTh 2:30-4:00p

Instructor: Michael Chiappini

Credits: 3 credits

Departments: New 2018 Summer, SAGES

Page last modified: December 5, 2017